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5k to 10k plans for a beginner - any suggestions?
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downcasteyes · 03/04/2019 11:43

I'm just finishing C25k which has been brilliant. I used to run a lot, but gave up when I was very unwell (needing surgery) and gained a lot of weight. I've tried multiple times to start up again, but have always got injured because I've tried to do too much too early, and because of the additional toll that the weight puts on joints etc. The gradual nature of C25k has been really beneficial for me, because I've avoided injury and increased my runs to 30 minutes now Grin. I'm very, very slow - around a 10 minute mile - but so proud of myself.

I would really like to start a 5k to 10k programme at the end of C25k, but I need something quite gradual and gentle. I'm not bothered about running a fast 10k at this point - I just want to get around. However, a lot of the programmes seem very involved, and I'm worried that I will injure myself and undo all the progress I've made.

If anyone could suggest a programme for beginners, I'd be really grateful!

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Daisydoesnt · 06/04/2019 19:17

OP if you like the structure of C25K why don't you literally write yourself out a programme, based on 3 runs per week: one long, slow & steady run, one short & fast run, and one hilly/ challenging run (as others have suggested)? I did exactly this after finishing C25K in September, and pinned it to the kitchen wall. For the record, long run is Friday, fast run is Monday and hilly run (boo!) is Wednesday. Add a little distance to your long run maybe two or three weeks in four, so you give your body time to recover and consolidate.

When you've got up to your 10km distance (which by the way, you'll easily do in 10 weeks) you can then start working on your speed by making your Wednesday run the most challenging/ focus of your training.

Also, later when you build up to longer distances, for instance when you start training for your first Half Grin you'll probably want to add an "easy" run to your repertoire the day after your long run, just to stretch out any stiffness in your legs.

At this stage I don't think it needs to be any more complicated than that.

Also I would really have a look at the runbritain website for local races to enter. I have done a series of 5ks and a 12km in the build up to my first Half (which was supposed to be last Sunday Sad) and they have been enormous fun and real confidence boosters.

I also must say the running thread is really friendly and has some really experienced runners on it, some of whom have already replied to you. Good luck!

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downcasteyes · 03/04/2019 18:05

"It took me 9 months to get to a half from starting c25k"

Wow, that's really encouraging! You are my hero! This is where I'd love to be by the end of the year.

@Whenitsover - hills make the most MASSIVE difference to pace. My route is about the only flat 3 mile course in my city. It's cheating, really, but I'm claiming it anyway. Grin DH who is a fell runner looked at me sternly when I asked about pace and said 'Hill reps' in a Vin Diesel style voice. Sad

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Whenisitover · 03/04/2019 16:35

I was about to start my own thread asking a similar question - I can do 5k in c35mins on the couple of hilly routes from my house (so really a 12 min miler - very ploddy but the hills are killers)
I did this off my own bat so not sure if I should do a c25K or from mid way, or like you look for something that takes me further.
I need to get quicker up the hills - which is the killer
I want to try my nearest parkrun which is a flat route - just to see what speed I can manage without the hills

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2rachtint · 03/04/2019 13:46

@downcasteyes look at some parkrun results for women, an under 30 min 5k is great. I just checked my local one (granted quite a slow course) and only 29 out of 150 women were under 30 mins!

It took me 9 months to get to a half from starting c25k - I gradually increased it and it was fine. You are doing really well!

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SummerHouse · 03/04/2019 13:18

Your plan sounds brilliant. 10 weeks building distance and 10 weeks building speed. I need a goal too so unless I am booked into a specific race I lose focus. Could you have a look at 10k runs near you in 10 weeks and get booked? Good luck! You can totally do this. And I couldn't agree more that you have done the hard part already. My beginners 15 min runs were the hardest I ever did. A 30 min 5k is an excellent start.

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downcasteyes · 03/04/2019 13:10

"I love hills!!"

You total nutter! Grin

"10 minute mile is not slow!"

Bear in mind I'm only just finishing c25k, so I'm only running 3 miles, though! It is pretty ploddy.

I need to have a programme that leads up to a target, or I will lose focus. I'm thinking

  • getting around a 10k (however slow): 10ish weeks
  • running a faster 10k: 10ish weeks


then I wonder if I might be ready to try for a half?
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2rachtint · 03/04/2019 12:19

10 minute mile is not slow!

I joined a running club and enjoy going with them and it gives me variety. I tend to do one longer, slowish run (gradually increasing distance), one short, fast run (normally parkrun) and one intervals/hill set.

Once you can run 30 mins constantly, you've done the hardest bit!

Entering races helped motivate me too.

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SummerHouse · 03/04/2019 12:15

Don't do stuff you hate. If you want to mix it up intervals are great. Just do 3 mins slow 1 min fast. I just make it up. As for long and short runs, yes, have a mix but just what suits and what you have time for and feel like.

I love hills!!

My non programme got me through a marathon.

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AuntieStella · 03/04/2019 12:11

It was also a typo for 10k Blush - though I did use that approach for my first Half (21k)

My general approach to maintaining running fitness is to run at least 3x a week, making one of them a challenge (hills, intervals or fartlek if I cba to count repeats) and making one of them a long (increasing time, but sticking at an easy/steady pace).

Do you have a hilly Parkrun nearby? Start off expecting to walk up some/all the hills. And challenge yourself to get that bit fitter that you can run the whole thing in a few weeks time

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downcasteyes · 03/04/2019 12:03

Hmmm, interesting Auntie! Congratulations on 19k, that's awesome!

I suppose I feel like I ought to start to build some structure and variation into the training so I start improving - isn't that what you are supposed to do? I dread to say it, because I hate them, but I feel like I should be doing hill reps?? And maybe a longer run? And perhaps a fast, shorter run? But obviously I need to keep things gentle for a while because I am still a beginner.

Maybe I should do another 9 week programme from 5k to 10k focused just on distance, and then a further one to build speed?

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AuntieStella · 03/04/2019 11:56

I didn't really use a plan for going from C25K to 19k - I just kept running the same number of days a week and added an extra 5 mins to one of the runs from time to time .

I did use a training plan for my second Half Marathon (and ran a PB). The one I used was published by CRUK for charity runners, and they do ones for 10k too. Maybe one of the wouid work for you?

[[https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/get-involved/find-an-event/training-for-a-10k]

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SummerHouse · 03/04/2019 11:47

I don't think you need one. Just enjoy it. If you want to increase distance just do it gradually. Never run more than 5% over your furthest run. So if you are doing a 30 min 5k, just run add 1.5 mins and so on...

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