Talk

Advanced search

Would I be unreasonable to correct the teacher?

(375 Posts)
Horthnangerabbey Tue 12-Dec-17 17:17:10

It is a minor thing really but if the teacher had told the class something that you knew was wrong, would you tell her? Or would you just explain to your own child the correct info and keep quiet?

ElenaBothari Tue 12-Dec-17 17:19:19

I'd tell her politely, and in a one on one conversation (not in front of the children).

IJoinedJustToPostThis Tue 12-Dec-17 17:19:20

How wrong?

Eg if they tell a bunch of teenagers that condoms are pointless, I would correct. If they spelled privilege 'privelege', I wouldn't.

Sparklingbrook Tue 12-Dec-17 17:20:05

Depends what it was.

Blackteadrinker77 Tue 12-Dec-17 17:21:09

What do you think they were wrong about?

iklboo Tue 12-Dec-17 17:21:13

Depends what it is. If it's that dinosaurs didn't exist I would correct.

Pengggwn Tue 12-Dec-17 17:21:18

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

IamtheDevilsAvocado Tue 12-Dec-17 17:21:27

Totally depends what the error is.... As above...

OhChill Tue 12-Dec-17 17:21:37

Depends what it was.

JoJoSM2 Tue 12-Dec-17 17:22:33

Eg if they tell a bunch of teenagers that condoms are pointless, I would correct. If they spelled privilege 'privelege', I wouldn't.

That would be my take on it too.

BrizzleDrizzle Tue 12-Dec-17 17:23:01

I'd tell my child (if they didn't already know) but I wouldn't talk to the teacher about it unless it was something really, terribly wrong.

I did talk to the teacher when they told my DC that they were better off not going to university if they wanted to go into a specific profession that requires a degree.

Frederickvonhefferneffer Tue 12-Dec-17 17:23:17

I experienced this, I just explained to my child the correct info and it was also an opportunity to point out to not believe everybody all the time.

MrsU88 Tue 12-Dec-17 17:24:56

How do you know you're right and they're wrong?

Frederickvonhefferneffer Tue 12-Dec-17 17:26:26

In my case the teacher had told the class that trees are non living, like rocks.

Malbecfan Tue 12-Dec-17 17:28:32

We have. Upstart Y6 teacher asked DD which was the best and worst conductor of electricity out of gold, plastic and copper. She knew plastic was the worst, but I wasn't sure about the best so told her to ask her dad, who has a PhD in a related subject. He looked it up for her (did not know off the top of his head) and if memory serves me right, I think it is gold that is marginally better, but not by much. She wrote this on her homework then got it marked wrong. She then missed out on house points or some bonus for getting all your work right and was deeply pissed off with the teacher. He ignored her when she tried to explain what her dad did...

Parents' Evening was the following week. DH printed out a couple of data sheets and took them in. We listened to the usual guff about how good she is at maths, how gobby she can be from the English/Maths teacher who was also the Head. Then the other chap asked if we had any questions. DH explained about the gold and copper. I caught the Head's eye - we were both trying so hard not to explode with laughter. The guy who had marked it wrong had assumed that because copper is in house wiring, it conducts better. DH asked him to check the relative prices of copper and gold. The next morning, the Head thanked me for giving her the best laugh of the night

curryforbreakfast Tue 12-Dec-17 17:32:16

I just tell my kid, knowing that he won't keep it to himself in class.

So far we've had such gems as Pluto still being a planet, bats being blind, Henry Ford invented cars and that Napoleon was short.

RedSkyAtNight Tue 12-Dec-17 17:35:10

I have too. DS's year 5 had completely misunderstood how BODMAS worked. On the basis that this was fairly fundamental to maths in their future lives, I(quietly) corrected him.

HermioneAndTheSniffle Tue 12-Dec-17 17:35:28

How do you know you're right and they're wrong?

Does it really need asking??
Or is it the assumption that the teacher is always right?

Pengggwn Tue 12-Dec-17 17:36:31

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

RestingGrinchFace Tue 12-Dec-17 17:36:57

It depends. Is it something that you know is wrong (like saying that the crusade occurred in the Victorian era) or something that you think is wrong like immunisation are safe. If it's the former yes. If it is the later then just explain your POV to your child in private.

HappyintheHills Tue 12-Dec-17 17:38:20

My DS was mighty confused by a teacher telling them there is no gravity on the moon.
I’m an engineer and had already explained the difference between mass and weight to him.

Mumof56 Tue 12-Dec-17 17:42:26

hmm

Then the other chap asked if we had any questions. DH explained about the gold and copper. I caught the Head's eye - we were both trying so hard not to explode with laughter. The guy who had marked it wrong had assumed that because copper is in house wiring, it conducts better. DH asked him to check the relative prices of copper and gold. The next morning, the Head thanked me for giving her the best laugh of the night

Material IACS (International Annealed Copper Standard)
Ranking Metal% Conductivity
1Silver (Pure)105%
2Copper100%
3Gold (Pure)70%

* Conductivity ratings are expressed as a relative measurement to copper. A 100% rating does not indicate no resistance.

Horthnangerabbey Tue 12-Dec-17 17:42:40

it’s something I know is wrong, yes, although i understand why they made the mistake. They told the class that Jane Austen was a Victorian writer writing in Victorian times.

Pengggwn Tue 12-Dec-17 17:43:35

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

AdoraBell Tue 12-Dec-17 17:46:30

It would depend on what they said for me.

DH had a teacher used to cross out his correctly spelt words, in spelling tests, and replace them with an incorrect version. Apparently it was an interesting conversation when PILs complained.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now