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Has anyone made the move from state to private?
8

Jeffers3 · 17/09/2018 20:05

As per title.
I’ve seen a job I’m interested in but it’s in a private school. I’ve been teaching at a state school in quite a deprived area (high percentage of PP) since I qualified. I am wondering if you’ve made the move what differences you’ve noticed? Length of your day? Parents? Expectations?

The post I’m looking at is very close to home and has some other benefits that my current state school doesn’t.

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MrsZola · 17/09/2018 20:19

Yes, I have. After 30 years in state schools I moved to a teeny, only been open 4 years private school. I have 6 children in my class, mixed year1/2. I work from 8am until 1pm. The workload is minimal compared to state - I plan in the way that's most useful for me. I don't take anything home to mark, I conference with the children as they work. I have half a morning PPA each week but do plan one morning at the weekend.I actually get to read with each child every day which is heaven. Haven't been there long enough to comment on parents. My work/life balance is good and I'm so glad I made the move.

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longsigh · 17/09/2018 22:03

Yes... moved from large city academy school to small private school.
I earn less money but the behavior is so much better. I have 10 in my class which means I get to speak to them all everyday!
It’s an old school school - but the new head is bringing it into the 21st century- tho he’s finding it hard as there is some resistance from older staff.
I love it.. the parents are fussy occasionally but no more than a state school and seem much more appreciative than state school.
I do a lot of duties so that’s a negative but that’s about it really!
Go for it- it feels like a job rather than all consuming chore!

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DinahMorris · 17/09/2018 22:52

I did it, in secondary science. Classes are smaller so I know my kids better, which makes differentiation (and feedback, reports, parents evening) far easier, but there is zero tolerance for not knowing everything about a child. Working day is longer, but so are holidays. Extra-curricular are expected by slt, but parents are really appreciative. In some cases we are expected to be somewhat more corporate in dealing with parents (such as a maximum reply time) but equally slt are far more willing to call parents in when students aren't meeting behaviour expectations.

Basically, it is swings and roundabouts. Some things are better, some are worse.

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tomhazard · 18/09/2018 09:09

Yep - secondary.
Classes are half the size which is amazing. Max 16 in a class and often less.
I teach until 4.15pm but Have very long holidays to balance this out.
There is much more autonomy and far less initiatives.
Parents can be difficult and demanding as they are paying, but you get used to it.

I will never return to the state sector if I can help it- the pros outweigh the cons too significantly imo.

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GrimSqueaker · 18/09/2018 13:17

Be wary. Be wary of small, financially insecure and "interestingly managed" setups.

I shifted - school turned out to be run by a couple who were, quite frankly, bonkers. Anything the parents wanted they were given into over, and it was just whim after whim after whim from the owners which we had to implement (there was one about needing to continually expose pupils to non standard paper sizes so we had to spend all our time cutting paper into ovals, stars, random rectangular shapes etc)... staffing got cut to the point one teacher was teaching with the cordless phone on her desk so she could work as school secretary at the same time... the cleaner went on long-term sick (she only ever hoovered the one square of carpet tile around the door anyway) so we were asked to "chip in and clean the school"...

Then two teachers got pregnant so the school closed rather than foot maternity leave bills and various salary payments and pension contributions vanished along with the owners.

Big, well established school - no probs... but just be wary of these small setups that are struggling.

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GHGN · 18/09/2018 14:48

Been in private for two years. No one has observed my lesson yet. Totally trusted to plan and teach the way I want it. I don’t have to worry too much about pretty much anything rather than concentrating on my job.

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teacherspets · 18/09/2018 17:38

Yep, I moved four years ago and will never go back.

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VioletFlamingo · 18/09/2018 22:03

Yes moved from a high PP state school to a very high flying, all-girls over-subscribed London private school.
The pressures are different but overall I am far more relaxed. I have a lot more time to do things, so feel I do my job well. The girls are delightful and the levels of behaviour management needed is next to none. I still feel I am making a difference, just in different ways. Parents are big, they are your client and you have to communicate well, pre-empt issues and generally keep them happy. But many parents are lovely and supportive.
I earn a lot more but that is down to being at a very well-resourced school. This isn't always the case when moving.
Sometimes I miss the kids, the challenge and the relentless drive to get kids to make progress at my old school. But then I remember the bullying over-stressed SLT, the hours of pointless meetings, the lack of PPA time and resources... and I couldn't go back.

As PP said.. It is SO IMPORTANT to avoid smaller, financially unstable schools. Check out the school's reputation and if it is full or not. If not, you will find marketing and parent-pleasing is the top priority which isn't fun! A good state school is always miles better than a weak private school.

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