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Go on then, I'll give it a go!

(7 Posts)
Tipex Wed 27-Jul-05 09:53:02

I'm starting Ds on solids next week (hes 23 weeks). How do i go about it? I know about purees and stuff, but wondered do I offer food before his breast feed or after? hes fed on demand so theres no real schedule to his BF's. I wondered if I should start one before starting solids or we'll be all over the shop. And how many times a day do I offer solids? Any suggestions?

NotQuiteCockney Wed 27-Jul-05 09:55:42

I'd just offer once a day, to start. I didn't bother with a schedule, just fed at what seemed like a reasonable time to me. If he's feeding pretty often during the day, and as long as he doesn't have a giant breastfeed just before, whenever is good for you, will be fine.

Try purees, but don't be surprised if he's not interested - my DS2 wasn't, and we just went over to finger foods, which he loves.

(I wouldn't bother with baby rice. If you want to do a puree to start, maybe try carrot or sweet potato?)

roosmum Wed 27-Jul-05 09:57:47

hiya tipex, just saw this & thought i'd join in at clueless corner...

have tried roo with food recently (he's 6 mths next tue), with varying success. started with a bit of rice, went down ok, but have had several days when he doesn't want anything. v. happy to eat peach puree yesterday tho! am trying a little food at lunchtime, after some milk...

does this sound about right to you??

roosmum Wed 27-Jul-05 10:01:22

nqc - have def found that ds is not really into puree: is it because he's 6 mths rather than the 4 that people used to wean at (& when they HAD to have puree)?? just wonder as i gave him a tiny portion of cheese-potato bake the other day (much lumpier) & he seemed to like that.

what finger foods did you use?? ds had a stick of watermelon the other day, but he didn't eat it as such, just sucked all juice out & spat out anything solidy!

WigWamBam Wed 27-Jul-05 10:03:52

I just started with pureed fruit once a day, all you're after at first is just little tastes and getting him used to taking things other than milk. I didn't bother with rice either; I preferred to start her on real food with a bit of taste.

My dd was demand fed as well so there was no schedule to her bfs, but that will change as he gets older. As to whether you give solids before or after a breastfeed, go with what you feel will suit you best. I gave a little solid food before a breastfeed to start with, but really it's all down to what you feel will go down best. My dd was a real milk monster and didn't like her feeds interrupted, which was why I gave the purees before the breast.

NotQuiteCockney Wed 27-Jul-05 10:07:22

roosmum, I do think that's it. At four months, you can "train" them to swallow much, but at six months, they're much less easy to push around.

One really good explanation I've heard is, when they're breast or bottle-feeding, they control how much they get, how fast, etc. When they're big kids, they feed themselves, they control how much they get, how fast, etc. Why have a bit in the middle where we shove food in?

Good starting finger foods:
- banana
- reasonably-well-cooked green beans
- breadsticks (wheat - allergy risk)
- rice cakes
- spears of melon
- penne/fusilli (wheat - allergy risk)
- anything vaguely chip-shaped and soft.

Choking/gagging is a risk, you do have to watch them carefully, and be sure you know what to do if they start to choke. It's worth watching carefully, too, because gagging looks like choking (but with breathing), but can be ignored.

I think the current UNICEF-recommended weaning technique is straight to finger food at 6 months.

NotQuiteCockney Wed 27-Jul-05 10:08:45

Oh, and the first few times they get finger food, they often do just suck on it, lick it, whatever. Give them time, they figure out what they're doing. DS2 only really started eating near 7 months. Now, at 10 months, he eats pretty much anything - he'll even take things off a spoon if I'm careful to make sure he's agreeing to it.

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