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When a SEN/Additional/medical need is apparent, what is the usual course of action?

(6 Posts)

Me again (thread 1001, sorry), DS was soiling in school, obvious medical problem and was under the care of GP then Paed as of Oct 10. IEP was put inplace finally in April 11, but what assesments etc. are usually done to aid the child? Thankyou smile

morechocolate Fri 08-Jul-11 13:14:52

Sorry me again. My son was referred to paed for wetting and soiling before entering year one and had no IEP or assessment at all for the whole of the school year. I felt that the other parents did not think he should be at school because of the accidents. School assured me that there had been no concerns and it was all handled very discreetly. I was made to feel paranoid even though it was obvious there was a huge issue on the school gates.

Have just read his medical notes where of one his medical professsionals had minuted a phone call from the Had Teacher stating that all the other parents were complaining about the hygeine issue of his accidents and we should be recommended to use nappies!

Our school have never changed a soiling accident and always call me if they notice, he changes himself if wet. My son never tells them of an accident.

leaving a child soiled and a parent come to collect is a form of abuse. Are you pushing for better care?

morechocolate Fri 08-Jul-11 20:03:10

No I cant push for anything until I find out why all the professionals have recorded child protection issues against me. Even if it is just to cover up medical misdiagnosis they must have a reason and until I can establish those I cant ask for anything. I wont even take my children to the GP at the moment, my husband has to take time off work I am so scared.

Every medical professional I spoke to said it was the norm for parent to collect the child whilst they sit soiled in the office!! I asked ERIC if this was correct and they said there was no legislation as to otherwise and it was up to the individual school.

I would be interested to read any links you have that give guidelines on the care that should be provided by school though if you have them.

whereabouts are you in the country? This doesn't sound right at all. I have alot alot alot of info, go through your situation again? I have a massive folder infront of me, all concluding leaving a soiled child is abuse, discrimination etc.

asdx2 Sat 09-Jul-11 07:03:23

My two children with autism started school in pull ups and I had it written into their statements that they would be kept clean by the TA supporting them and a toileting programme was put in place. They actually trained quite quickly (had been working on it at home) so the pull ups were only used for about a term.
Does your child have other difficulties? Would a statutory assessment be appropriate? I found this

*Intimate care for pupils without a statement of SEN
The DfE spokeswoman explained if the pupil does not have a statement of SEN, then there is no legal duty that requires the school to support the medical needs of pupils, including intimate care.
She said, however, that the DfE would expect schools to take all reasonable steps to ensure that pupils are supported with their medical needs. This is important on two counts:
Schools have a legal duty under part 4 of the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 1995, not to discriminate against disabled pupils in relation to their access to education
Schools have a common law duty of care for all children in their charge. In exceptional circumstances the duty of care could extend to supporting children with medical needs*

which suggests that without a statement the school isn't acting against guidelines which is really awful for your ds IMO.

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