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Is it possible to get a job if you REALLY want one?

(38 Posts)
MrsSnape Sun 13-Jul-08 10:33:33

I have been searching for a job since last year with no luck. I am currently unemployed and single so living existing on benefits.

I am desperate for work now and have decided that after the summer holidays (or towards the end) I am going to go all out to get a job, ANY job...

People say if you really want to work, you will find a job. Is this true?

Any ideas of where to look? who to apply to?

I'm going to write to Tesco and Asda first. Anymore ideas?

LIZS Sun 13-Jul-08 10:37:16

look online too - council funded jobs, for example, tend to be on their own site and cover a wide range from admin to those in sports centre, help shops, libraries, schools. You may have to settle for one less than is ideal but there are jobs around and it is easier to find another job by making contacts through the first one. Good luck

ScoobyDoo Sun 13-Jul-08 10:37:31

Yes it is true, i was desperate to go to work, i was becoming very depressed, i moved house & within 7 weeks i had a job, 4 of those weeks were waiting for my CRB to come back.

I think if you really want a job & when apllying be honest with what hours you can do you will find one in the end, i suppose it also depends on where you live & whats available in your area.

What have you applied to do? have you had any interviews yet?

ScoobyDoo Sun 13-Jul-08 10:39:38

Do you look on www.jobcentreplus.co.uk always good to keep looking as new jobs can appear all the time.

sarah293 Sun 13-Jul-08 10:42:18

Message withdrawn

zippitippitoes Sun 13-Jul-08 10:43:13

me too

i have to get a job

i dont get benefits i am living on borrowed money

i have given myself a dead line but i have had no luck so not sure what luck i willhave

Jajas Sun 13-Jul-08 10:49:13

I desperately need a job too but am finding it so hard to get something that will fit around school hours. Don't do anything professional enough to earn decent money (just PA/secretarial thing). Most things I look at the money wouldn't cover childcare so no point in working. We don't have any family to help either so would have to pay.

Very downheartening isn't it? We are up to our eyeballs in debt and living very precariously. I hate, hate, hate worrying about money sad.

findtheriver Sun 13-Jul-08 11:24:38

If your mindset is that you want a job, ANY job, which it seems to be, then yes, you should find something fairly quickly. The difficulty is when people are too fussy - they put all sorts of conditions on what they will accept - eg has to fit around school hours, don't want to do this or that etc.
Although I see JaJa's point, I don't entirely agree. Work is about more than just paying the bills - it's about interacting with adults, raising your self esteem etc. I worked for a while for virtually no financial gain as I had two kids in nursery but the long term advantages were keeping my hand in and being in a better position once the kids were at school.
Best of luck MrsSnape

Tortington Sun 13-Jul-08 11:27:18

yip
jobcentreplus.gov
fish for jobs
go o your local jobcentre

ask for applicatin forms from shops in the ervice secto
asda
tesco
etc

kfc
macdonalds

Tortington Sun 13-Jul-08 11:27:53

guardian jobs

do you have any qulifications - experience in a particular sector?

cornsilk Sun 13-Jul-08 11:29:09

It may depend where you live. My ds's school are always advertising for dinner ladies and everyone I know who has trained as a teaching assistant has got a job from that.

cornsilk Sun 13-Jul-08 11:30:46

I know someone who does dog walking - could try something like that. Cleaning? You could put as advert in the local paper to see if there's any uptake.

findtheriver Sun 13-Jul-08 11:33:00

If your mindset is that you want a job, ANY job, which it seems to be, then yes, you should find something fairly quickly. The difficulty is when people are too fussy - they put all sorts of conditions on what they will accept - eg has to fit around school hours, don't want to do this or that etc.
Although I see JaJa's point, I don't entirely agree. Work is about more than just paying the bills - it's about interacting with adults, raising your self esteem etc. I worked for a while for virtually no financial gain as I had two kids in nursery but the long term advantages were keeping my hand in and being in a better position once the kids were at school.
Best of luck MrsSnape

findtheriver Sun 13-Jul-08 11:33:23

woops sorry!

Skribble Sun 13-Jul-08 11:56:48

I agree there are certainly jobs to be had, but trying to fit them round school hours or other childcare is where it gets difficult.

I think it is a lot easier for younger people with no childcare issues, OK you might have to take a rubbish minimum wage job but you can move up from that, its easier to get a better job if you already have one.

Retail can be a pain, a lot of high street shops operate zero hours contract, which does not give a set amount of hours or shift times, these are crap for anyone, as some weeks you could be working 5 hrs then other weeks 35 hours. Its hard to work another job around this as they want full flexability, some employers like M&S are better at giving fixed hours.

If you can doing some voluntary work can be a good way to get experience that will make employers look at you more favourably. All kinds of voluntary work availible, esp retail and admin. But of course this is no good if you need child care to do this.

Jajas Sun 13-Jul-08 12:55:53

findtheriver, I agree that it is about more than just money but at the moment money is what I need unfortunately.

I'm going to apply for a job as a school secretary (along with every other mother in the county) as it would fit in quite well with school hours. I can't believe that I was even looking at delivering the yellow pages the other day to earn a few pennies, mmmmm when I think of some of the great jobs I had before children. Oh well, that was then and this is now.

lalaa Sun 13-Jul-08 13:16:50

this is exactly the sort of stuff that the mumsnet should be listening to regarding how we can make life work for mums and dads.

it does my head in when people say asking to work only school hours is being fussy. it's not if there's no after school club and/or you don't make enough to cover the childcare anyway. it's a necessity!

Skribble Sun 13-Jul-08 14:23:56

I live in a village, no after school club, no other club in town will pick up from the school here, up until last year there were no childminders in the village and no others ones can make it out to the school to pick up. We now have 2 child minders, but both filled up with full timers.

I have managed to get a couple of part time jobs over the years but for me to get a full time proper 9-5 would be impossible. My MIL can collect from school but does not want to commit to having to do this 5 days a week. I am lucky that I have had a very flexible family freindly part time job that keeps me going and a very understanding MIL.

findtheriver Sun 13-Jul-08 16:23:15

lalaa - maybe 'fussy' has connotations, but I suppose the point is that most jobs just don't fit neatly around each end of the school day and school holidays. That's the reality. There are some, but the more restricted you are in what you can offer, the lower the chance of finding work - that's simply a fact.
Skribble - several years ago I could have been you! Oldest dc starting school, 2 younger ones at nursery. Village school, no after school (or before school!) club, no childminders, and no family to do any pick ups at all (so in that respect you have a slight advantage having your MIL). The only solution DH and I could find (other than one of us having to give up work) was to set up an after school club. I've mentioned this on other threads, so sorry if I'm repeating myself. It's not something I would recommend unless it's a last resort, as it was a HUGE amount of work - getting other parents on board (really frustrating as it was one of those villages where most people seemed to have extended family around them and didnt see the need for childcare). We formed a committee, investigated employment legislation, accessed set up grants (god, that was weeeeeks of work) advertised and appointed staff, organised rent for the school hall etc. Oh and of course we both had jobs and 3 children to be managing all the while!The one thing it proved to me is that where there's a will there's a way! We moved away from the village several years ago, and although the club ran for about 4 years altogether, it then folded - presumably because not enough people were prepared to carry on running it. There are no simple answers, but I guess the reality is that most jobs are NOT going to fit around school, so you either accept that, and find ways to manage as we did, or accept that you will sacrifice work to do all the school runs yourself.

Skribble Sun 13-Jul-08 17:44:55

I did have great intentions of getting a proper grown up job when my kids went to school, then the reality dawned.

I have done all sorts of jobs, like merchandising (counting CD,s and tiding cards, NT gift shop (wasn't flexable enough), deliver books for the Book Man etc etc. I have had my main part time job for the past umpteen years, luckly it is ultra flexable but involves a few really long weekends but the rest of the time it is a few shifts a week.

I did consider an after school club but the breakfast club that was running has been on and off for a few years so I don't hink there is the need for it and to be honest I don't want to be stuck looking after my kids it defeats the purpose grin. similar suspicions that a lot of families in the village with extended families and close freinds.

findtheriver Sun 13-Jul-08 18:52:35

I think rural areas are a real problem skribble. Although our out of school club ran successfully for the time my kids used it, it honestly was a nightmare to set up and even after it was established, there were situations like a member of staff leaving which then meant advertising, interviewing and making another appointment, enhanced CRB checks etc etc. And as you say, if you live in a community where lots of the young families have granny round the corner and will happily offload the kids onto her, its really hard to get the support you need. In the end we moved into a town (not just for this reason, there were others too) abd I have to say, there was immediately a very different 'feel' - lots more facilities and childcare providers, many more working parents etc. I think the important thing is not to give up. It is disheartening ... but your children will get to an age where they can get to and from school independently and won't need (and certainly won't want!)you there every minute of the holidays, so it will be easier in time.

expatinscotland Sun 13-Jul-08 18:57:22

'People say if you really want to work, you will find a job. Is this true?'

And they're talking out of their arse.

In fact, you can pretty much guarantee that anyone who trots out any sort of huge blanket statement like that is whittering out their backside.

findtheriver Sun 13-Jul-08 19:03:24

I don't agree they are talking out of their arse.
If you are determined to find a job, will work whatever shifts, are prepared to move to get work etc then actually I think you'd have to try pretty hard NOT to be offered something!!
As other posts have said, if you cannot work whatever hours, or travel, or whatever, then it can be difficult.

expatinscotland Sun 13-Jul-08 19:04:49

it can be impossible for some, find.

it really can.

particularly in rural areas and those with childcare issues.

expatinscotland Sun 13-Jul-08 19:05:53

i find generalisations and platitudes just ignorant and lazy thinking, tbh.

i mean, you wouldn't consider saying, 'if you want something bad enough, you'll get it' to someone who is infertile or has cancer or some sort of disease, would you?

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