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Declaring disability on application.

(10 Posts)
leftyloosy Thu 18-Jun-15 11:35:49

I'm applying jobs and I have Bipolar Disorder. It is well managed with medication. I am happy to declare in application, but they want to know how it effects my day to day life. The reality is, medication and enough sleep there isn't much impact. Should I say that?

flowery Thu 18-Jun-15 11:45:25

Do you feel its a disability?

I have epilepsy. As long as I take my medication and get enough sleep/don't get too stressed, it usually doesn't affect my day to day life, therefore I don't consider it a disability and it wouldn't occur to me to put it on a form as such.

leftyloosy Thu 18-Jun-15 11:58:45

I have declared it at my current job, as I have had some reasonable adjustments made. But I know I wouldn't need it in this job. So maybe I won't declare it.

FlumptyDumpty Thu 18-Jun-15 12:11:47

I would wait until you get a firm offer before declaring. That way, any discrimination will be very difficult/obvious. Sadly, there is still much misunderstanding and discrimination against bipolar. As far as I'm aware they shouldn't be asking for medical information in initial applications in any case.

Good luck!

HRAdvisor Thu 25-Jun-15 00:07:07

Firstly, you need not disclose this at the application stage.

Secondly, bipolar/manic-depressive disorder is consider a disability under the definition of Section 6 of the Equality Act (2010). You should declare it as such, when made a conditional offer of employment.

flowery Thu 25-Jun-15 05:21:41

That's not true HRAdvisor (!) The only conditions which are automatically considered a disability under the Equality Act are HIV/AIDS, cancer and MS.

Bipolar disorder can be, but isn't necessarily, which is why I asked the OP whether she considered it to be a disability.

HRAdvisor Thu 25-Jun-15 20:41:06

*That's not true HRAdvisor (!) The only conditions which are automatically considered a disability under the Equality Act are HIV/AIDS, cancer and MS.

Bipolar disorder can be, but isn't necessarily, which is why I asked the OP whether she considered it to be a disability.*

In the real word, medicated or not - as it makes no difference, nobody will be ever diagnosed as suffering from genuine manic depression, without it having a long term and substantial adverse affect on their day to day activities.

If it doesn't, then they're not bi-polar.

flowery Fri 26-Jun-15 08:22:00

Ah well you see I'm not a medical expert or someone with detailed knowledge of how the OPs condition affects her day to day life, which you obviously are, and have...

fedupandtired Sun 28-Jun-15 10:39:54

That's a load of rubbish HRAdvisor. Bipolar disorder is very individual and whilst it can be very debilitating for one person another person might only have one or two episodes their entire life. Does that make their condition any less genuine? No it doesn't.

Yes it can be very debilitating (I've just had my third hospital stay in six months) this isn't the case for everyone. Many people go years without being ill and would hate it if they were classed as disabled.

leftyloosy Wed 01-Jul-15 14:47:49

I have had reasonable adjustments made at my current work and I receive some DLA, so yes I do consider myself to have a disability under the terms of the act.

Thanks for the advice

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