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Calling supply teachers....

(9 Posts)
ja9 Fri 17-Jun-05 19:55:09

I've just registered as a supply teacher and a school has contacted me about working a day next week. The secretary said in passing that the headteacher would probably pay me for a 5 hr day rather than a 7 hr day as she wasnt expecting any preparation or marking. I thought that a days supply teaching was a days supply teaching - anyone else heard of this. I was a bit taken aback but just agreed to it anyway - i'm new to it all, but the more i think about it the more i feel a bit peeved about it. School is 9 15 to 3:15, so i'll not be paid for the lunch break. Is this standard practice?

hana Fri 17-Jun-05 20:08:37

think this is standard practice
teachers aren't paid for their lunchbreaks either on a regular contract
have never heard of extra hours and getting more money for doing so ( the marking and being supply I mean)

Hulababy Fri 17-Jun-05 20:12:04

Not done supply teaching in schools but I have been doing some in prison ed. I only gor paid for the hours I was teaching, not for my lunch break nor for the 15 minutes break in each session. Think it may be standard.

ButtonMoon Fri 17-Jun-05 20:26:25

You can either be paid hourly rate or your salary divided by 195 days-different schools do different things.

Yorkiegirl Fri 17-Jun-05 20:28:18

Message withdrawn

ja9 Fri 17-Jun-05 20:36:42

so being paid for 5 hrs for a full days teaching is std then and i shouldnt be feeling hard done by?

MaloryTowers Fri 17-Jun-05 20:59:21

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

tassis Sat 18-Jun-05 20:00:30

I've always been paid for the 7 hour day and think you're right to feel miffed

(but I did just hear that someone in the school you're off to do supply in is preggers so you never know, it could lead to a job!)

janeybops Sat 18-Jun-05 20:04:33

I used to get paid a daily rate calculated like this;

take your annual salary (if you were working full time in permanent job) and divide by the number of school days. (195 I thinks). This means that if you worked every single day then you would get the same money as if you were on a permenant contract iyswim.

This was 10 years ago though!

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