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Mumsnetters aren't necessarily qualified to help if your child is unwell. If you have any serious medical concerns, we would urge you to consult your GP.

Calling all asthma mums. . .

(14 Posts)
PixieOnaLeaf Tue 29-Sep-09 11:41:22

Message withdrawn

OhYouBadBadKitten Tue 29-Sep-09 13:18:12

dd was diagnosed as being a possible asthmatic when she was a toddler. Turned out it was true. Whenever she got a cold she would get a very tight repetitive cough that would mean she couldn't talk or walk without having to stop and it would be all night every night when she had a cold until we got on top of it. It got to the point of needing prednisolone and nebulisers. Horrible time.

Initially the diagnoses was done on listening to chest and observation. Now she sees an asthma nurse annually and does her peak flow with her.

dd very rarely audibly wheezes, though the gp can hear her with a stethscope sometimes. It is almost always cough form she has. It would be hard for me to miss it but in the early stages an outsider would think dd was just being annoying as her coughs don't sound like proper coughs at all.

The go didn't listen to her chest when I took her in for a knee problem.

don't know if that helps any?

I think your best bet would be to see if your practice has an asthma nurse. They can bbe really helpful to talk to.

PixieOnaLeaf Tue 29-Sep-09 19:22:42

Message withdrawn

OhYouBadBadKitten Tue 29-Sep-09 21:15:15

I think it does sound pretty normal treatment. Peak flows can be helpful, dh finds his helpful because lung function can decrease before he really notices and before his chest gets tight. Ideally, you'd catch it before that stage.

amtooyoungforthis Tue 29-Sep-09 21:27:20

Family of asthmatics here, daughters had trouble with viral infections which led to persistant coughs. They get breathless, no wheeze, allergies also play a big part. Out of 3, one had what I would call an asthma attack. Asthma for them just means occasional breathlessness, feeling a little out of puff and an irritating cough but only require to use reliever inhaler and all is well again. Every doctor visit means a quick chest check. They use preventer only in hayfever season and if they get a cold. Weirdly, one of them had an audible wheeze at birth, when listened to through stethascope and it was noted

My son on the other hand, although has same triggers, has what I think as proper attacks, many require hospital trip, nebuliser and oral steroids. He struggle to get air in and you can see his chest recess and his lips turn blue. He also gets checked at every doctor visit and has 3 monthly reviews with asthma clinic. He uses reliever and preventer daily

Girls were diagnosed during a breathless episode, son diagnosed during full blown attack. All are monitered careful and have taught how to manage their asthma. I only noticed when they had breathlessness but looking back one coughed everynight and it wasn't the boy or the one with the wheeze at birth hmm

princessmel Tue 29-Sep-09 21:39:00

No wheeze here, just a persistant cough. Every night all night untill ds was given a brown inhaler at 18m. It was like magic. We were ALL so much better off.

He was then given a releiver inhaler (which we thankfully don't use that much) at 2 and a half.

Switched to a purple one at 4 (i think) as the brown had seemed to stop being as affective.

We find ds is more coughy when the temperature changes (from cold to hot or hot to cold) and during the tree pollen season in March.
Also if he's run down.

We have had a few times when he's had a couple of days and nights of constant coughing, I mean not being able to speak a sentance without coughing , and this has led to steroids.

He has a peak flow devise which we use to see how is when he seems under the weather.

If he is more coughy at night we find that the humidifier helps aswell as using the blue puffer, up to 10 puffs if he is very bad.

Everytime I take him to the docs they listen to his chest, but then they do this with dd too and she's not ashmatic.

HTH

princessmel Tue 29-Sep-09 21:39:43

No wheeze here, just a persistant cough. Every night all night untill ds was given a brown inhaler at 18m. It was like magic. We were ALL so much better off.

He was then given a releiver inhaler (which we thankfully don't use that much) at 2 and a half.

Switched to a purple one at 4 (i think) as the brown had seemed to stop being as affective.

We find ds is more coughy when the temperature changes (from cold to hot or hot to cold) and during the tree pollen season in March.
Also if he's run down.

We have had a few times when he's had a couple of days and nights of constant coughing, I mean not being able to speak a sentance without coughing , and this has led to steroids.

He has a peak flow devise which we use to see how is when he seems under the weather.

If he is more coughy at night we find that the humidifier helps aswell as using the blue puffer, up to 10 puffs if he is very bad.

Everytime I take him to the docs they listen to his chest, but then they do this with dd too and she's not ashmatic.

HTH

Salsavita Tue 29-Sep-09 21:40:41

DS1 (now 12) was just the same as OYBK's DD - tight cough etc which to anyone listening it sounds really annoying - it started when he was a toddler too. He has his asthma review tomorrow.

He uses the brown inhaler twice a day every day and the blue inhaler as and when he needs it.

bethylou Tue 29-Sep-09 21:43:26

My DS was given inhalers this year after night coughing that required steaming in the bathroom nearly every night for about 6 months. I've never heard him wheeze though! I thought it wasn't asthma as his cough was very chesty, rather than the dry type that I have with asthma.
I was diagnosed through an exercise test up and down the street as a teenager (they didn't listen to my chest to know there was a problem, as they could hear me as I ran past outside the window!)

Now on preventers, I only get breathless when unwell or exercising. A peakflow metre helps me to know whether I need to take any extra treatment or not - a certain level and I know it's a cold I can manage; lower: a chest infection and need antibiotics and steroids. It aids self-management.

Some GPs listen to my chest when I visit for bad throats etc.. and some don't. There doesn't seem to be any consistnecy with this. I guess they take more care with children who might not be able to describe their symptoms as well as adults.

Everyone's asthma seems to be quite different so don't be upset that you might have missed it - I did in my DS and consider myself a bit of an expert!

Salsavita Wed 30-Sep-09 06:23:19

oh and I forgot to say too, they listened to his chest last time we went but don't always.

backtoworkthistime Wed 30-Sep-09 18:43:41

ds mainly wheezy with shortness of breath on exercise and with colds.
He is often wheezy in the early mornings and wheezy for days on and off with colds.He also has had some attacks which have been mainly with viruses and needed steroids and many puffs of his blue inhaler.
He is on 2 puffs of steroid twice a day continuously.

When he was a toddler I found the GPs a bit slow to sit up and take notice of his wheeziness but now he has been referred to the paeds as it is very clear he has asthma and it is not really under control.

backtoworkthistime Wed 30-Sep-09 18:45:08

sorry he is now seven and has just got his first peak flow meter.

suiledonn Wed 30-Sep-09 18:49:23

DD1 is 3.4, diagnosed at 19 months and on a preventer ever since. She has had a bad summer and is just out of hospital after an attack.

Hers starts with a cough, quickly developing into a wheeze at which stage her breathing gets very shallow and fast and she requires a nebulizer and sometimes oxygen. I have seen her turn quite blue. Very scary.

We recently bought our own nebulizer but this time she got very ill very quickly so it wasn't much use.

stressedbutluvem Tue 06-Oct-09 14:28:37

"Asthma (at your fingertips)" Dr Mark Levy, Trisha Weller Prof Sean Hilton now in 4th edition. Get from internet or some libraries have it in. Very easy to read and easy just to dip into when queries arrive. Really useful.

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