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to object to people going on to private farming land whenever they feel like it?

(69 Posts)
whatcheekyfuckery Sat 30-Sep-17 18:48:57

There's a field behind our house, owned and farmed by a local farmer who I know slightly. Because of our location, we can't help seeing what's going on in this field. We also appreciate the privacy it generally gives us, as our garden looks out onto this field. Equally, anyone who's in it can clearly look into our private garden. I contacted the farmer a couple of years ago to let him know that some people had started increasingly coming to stroll in it, let their dogs run free on it etc and that I often saw his growing crops being trampled on, etc. (There's no public right of way on this land and we live in a village that is very well supplied with plenty of alternative areas eg. a huge recreation ground, many country lanes and a lovely community meadow where most people take their dogs).

Farmer was grateful to me and confirmed to me, then, that indeed he didn't want members of the public on his land, and said he'd be glad if I'd politely mention this to anyone I saw on it if they came near our property. (AFAIK he hasn't yet put up 'No Trespassing' signs though). Today there was a whole family, kids and several adults, playing on this field, right near our fence and able to look straight into our garden. They probably weren't doing any 'damage' (field has just been harvested) but it concerned me that, if not challenged, they'll go on doing this, assuming this field is free for them to access, also thereby advertising it as a supposedly accessible area for anyone else who fancies going on to it. As I see it, over time this could become a real nuisance for the farmer as well as for us, and things would have to get a lot worse, both for him and for us, before he'd be forced to put up 'no trespassing' or 'Private' signs.

WWYD? I don't want to be an interfering busybody, but equally, shouldn't most people realise that farmland is private land and not just another space they can go all over whenever they feel like it? It's the brazen entitledness of it that especially irks me. I'd be grateful to know what others think. Should I just let this happen or should I be bold enough to challenge these people, even though it's not actually my own land? Farmers, I'd be particularly interested in your take on this.

AIBU to politely challenge them about the fact that they are on private land?

whatcheekyfuckery Mon 02-Oct-17 16:45:56

Just bumping this, as it would be great to have some other views on it!
Thanks!

SaucyJack Mon 02-Oct-17 16:49:56

Wouldn't it be in his interests to put up a "private land" sign? People genuinely may not realise.

I don't really understand why he'd have to be forced to.

Loopytiles Mon 02-Oct-17 16:51:54

Not your business. I might inform him of people on his land but wouldn't approach people.

TrollTheRespawnJeremy Mon 02-Oct-17 16:52:09

This drives me batty. They're either rude or ignorant.

I'd tell him to put up a sign but in the meantime I'd be quite happy to tell people to remove themselves.

Morestrawberriesplease Mon 02-Oct-17 16:55:58

Sounds like you're being a busy body to me, it's not your land so...
They might not genuinely not know it's private land, lots of land in the U.K. Has access rights to the public - right to roam- so it's not always clear. If the farmer cares or there's damage being done the. He should put up signs or deal with it. Is it really so awful having
People exercise by walking through?

WhoWants2Know Mon 02-Oct-17 17:02:34

I don't agree that OP is being a busybody by keeping an eye on what goes on behind her land. People who access the field can check out her property and anything they'd like to steal.

If you're brave, just go tell them that they're trespassing and need to leave.

Increasinglymiddleaged Mon 02-Oct-17 17:08:46

Yabu it isn't your land and it's up to him to police it not you. Some landowners shock horror allow people to use stubble/ harvested fields. It has nothing to do with you just because your house backs onto the field and it interrupts your rural idyl.

MadisonMontgomery Mon 02-Oct-17 17:11:04

I would tell them they are trespassing, as they might not be aware. My dad’s best friend owns some land near to my dads house and he exercises his dogs on it - other people noticed him doing it and started walking on it themselves as they assumed there was a right of way.

PopGoesTheWeaz Mon 02-Oct-17 17:16:33

the owner needs to nip it in the bud otherwise they can eventually claim prolonged usage and gain right of way

iknowimcoming Mon 02-Oct-17 17:21:23

Two separate issues here imo - 1. The farmer has no signs up but has told you to tell people it’s private land if you see them on there. Not your responsibility, if he wants to address the problem let him put signs up etc. By all means let him know if it continues to happen, but don’t get involved with the people yourself. 2. Views into your garden/property are your responsibility- if you don’t want people to see in, you need to address appropriate fencing to prevent it. It’s not the farmers responsibility to protect your privacy. FWIW people are cheeky feckers and of course shouldn’t be on the land in the first place but that’s by the by really.

bridgetreilly Mon 02-Oct-17 17:22:21

It's true that there is a lot of land with public access rights but it is the trespassers' responsibility to know whether the land they are on is public access or not. You wouldn't just walk through other people's gardens, why would you think you can just walk over other people's farms?

I would remind the farmer again, and if I were him I'd put up a sign. If I were you, and the trespassers were noisy or intrusive, I'd ask them if they had permission to be there, because actually it's private land.

CallMeDollFace Mon 02-Oct-17 17:27:45

YANBU

There's a similar thread I've been following on here, concerning the dangers of dogs roaming around on farmland.

We own a farm and keep dairy cattle. Each year some of our animals die from neosporosis, a disease carried by dog faeces which is left on farmland. It can live in the soil for six months, so even if the land appears 'empty' it can still be a problem. We rotate our cattle around all our fields, for effective grass grazing.

I would also say that before I met dh and learned more about this first hand, that even I knew that if there was no footpath sign then you weren't allowed access. I don't agree that the farmer should put his/her own signs up, explaining the land is private. No footpath, no entry.

More on neosporosis here:

www.countryfile.com/news/neosporosis-hidden-danger-dogs-pose-cattle

LastNightMyWifeHooveredMyHead Mon 02-Oct-17 17:27:58

Incredible that some PP think it's the farmer's responsibility to put up signs - do your offices and gardens have signs telling people they are private property?!

silverlace Mon 02-Oct-17 17:28:30

As a farmer I would be grateful that you had told me but wouldn't expect you to approach anyone on my behalf.

Go and see the farmer and tell him that people have been there. Ask him how you can contact him so that if it happens again you will call him straight away and he can come and speak to them.

LRDtheFeministDragon Mon 02-Oct-17 17:31:34

I'd just tell them they were trespassing TBH. It'd really piss me off. Sure, it's not your land, but you know the person who owns the land isn't happy, so I don't see how you're being unreasonable.

I bet the farmer's too busy, especially when the field's not currently in a state where people will do damage, but it's neighbourly for you to help out IMO. After all, if you lived next door to someone with a garden and saw a bunch of randomers on your neighbour's children's swings, would you hesitate to go over and ask them to fuck off? I don't think so.

Ttbb Mon 02-Oct-17 17:33:47

Why don't you offer to pay for and put up a sign?

MsMims Mon 02-Oct-17 17:38:08

Agree that it's wrong and selfish but not really down to you to police. What if someone got defensive and they know where you live?

Not sure if it's an awareness problem or just people doing what they like but I also live in a rural area and see this happening despite an abundance of public footpaths. Maybe just laziness/ convenience?

Increasinglymiddleaged Mon 02-Oct-17 17:38:30

I bet the farmer's too busy, especially when the field's not currently in a state where people will do damage, but it's neighbourly for you to help out IMO. After all, if you lived next door to someone with a garden and saw a bunch of randomers on your neighbour's children's swings, would you hesitate to go over and ask them to fuck off? I don't think so.

She has told the farmer, he has nodded in the right places and done nothing about it. The field is now harvested so no damage is being done. If he was bothered he would have done something about it.

Increasinglymiddleaged Mon 02-Oct-17 17:39:17

Why should the op tell him how to manage his private land?

LRDtheFeministDragon Mon 02-Oct-17 17:41:17

I know that? I read the same thread as you. The farmer probably would care if there were crops in the field, but is busy right now. As far as I can see the OP's doing nothing wrong to tell people they're trespassing so she can knock herself out.

It can't only be me who gets a pleasant sense of satisfaction out of getting people to stop being entitled fuckers, especially if it's also the right thing to do.

Increasinglymiddleaged Mon 02-Oct-17 17:45:03

It can't only be me who gets a pleasant sense of satisfaction out of getting people to stop being entitled fuckers, especially if it's also the right thing to do.

I would argue the entitled fucker is the one who lives next door but thinks they have jurisdiction over the privately owned field behind. But we all see things differently.

CallMeDollFace Mon 02-Oct-17 17:47:06

She has told the farmer, he has nodded in the right places and done nothing about it. The field is now harvested so no damage is being done. If he was bothered he would have done something about it.

How do you know she/ he's done nothing about it?

And yes to being too busy! We don't have time to go chasing off every trespasser and would definitely appreciate the support of the local community in politely informing people.

As for 'no damage done' see my previous post on neosporosis.

LRDtheFeministDragon Mon 02-Oct-17 17:48:01

But she doesn't think she does have jurisdiction, does she? She's just narked people are trespassing.

I would be equally narked if someone were trespassing on my neighbour's garden. Sure, it's not mine, but it's rude, and they're my neighbours.

Also, having lived around farms for a long time, I do know how busy farmers get, and I know perfectly well why they're not likely to have time to worry about a field not currently in any likelihood of being damaged. That does not mean they don't care or don't mind.

Increasinglymiddleaged Mon 02-Oct-17 17:51:30

*But she doesn't think she does have jurisdiction, does she? She's just narked people are trespassing.

It's private land and therefore a civil matter between the people and the landowners. If he isn't bothered while it's stubble then its up to him. It has nothing to do with her at all.

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