To think this teacher is fucking loopy?

(272 Posts)
OverReactionMuch Sat 16-Feb-13 18:12:50

DS2 (just 5) apparently broke a branch off one of the trees in the school playground. He was swinging on it (normal boy behaviour?).

Teacher, who is Head of KS1 then paraded him around all the KS1 classes with the offending branch lecturing the other DC on how naughty my DC was and what a terrible thing he did.

She also phoned me (I did not know she had taken him round the classes) to inform me of my DS's 'crime'. I said I would talk to him. She also took the 'dead' branch into the afterschool club and showed all the DC there and so the staff could show me the offending article when I picked him up.

DS has said that he did not mean for the branch to come off.

I am actually quite furious that she has demonised my DS to the other DCs. DS has found it very hard to settle into school and I actually had a meeting with this woman before he started at school as I was concerned about how he would settle (undiagnosed SN is my mother's gut instinct) and she has totally ignored every thing I said.

AIBU to loudly voice my displeasure on Monday?

MrsRajeshKoothrappali Sat 16-Feb-13 18:15:05

I think I'd give her a slap.

What an utter bitch.

Who the hell does she think she is??

shock

Euphemia Sat 16-Feb-13 18:16:52

Her reaction was completely disproportionate to the harm done.

No it's not "normal boy behaviour" - it's completely unacceptable.

What are your mother's qualifications?

You would be unreasonable to loudly voice anything, but I think you should certainly talk to the teacher.

TheLibrarianOok Sat 16-Feb-13 18:16:57

Sadly more of this kind of crap still goes on in our primary schools than most of us would be comfortable with. sad
YANBU

LilQueenie Sat 16-Feb-13 18:17:09

name and shame her locally. If it works for her.....

zwischenzug Sat 16-Feb-13 18:17:18

No, you are right she is a nut on a power trip. Put her in her place.

ratbagcatbag Sat 16-Feb-13 18:17:26

Wow, nasty cow, I'd go mad for that. sad

Madmum24 Sat 16-Feb-13 18:18:04

This is hilarious..........what is the world coming to?

Go and see her (YANBU) and bring the offending branch with you and apologize to it on your ds's behalf.

HollyBerryBush Sat 16-Feb-13 18:18:31

Blimey.

Well, if you are going to have branches in reach, expect them to climbed and dangled upon, this is what children do.

However that is a massive over reaction on her part.

HollyBerryBush Sat 16-Feb-13 18:19:16

Liking madmums style!

thebody Sat 16-Feb-13 18:19:25

Well she does sound a bit ott but maybe she saw it as a safety issue, he could have fallen out of the tree or the branch landed on him or another child.

School playground rules etc, had she told him not to do it before it happened?

If I were you I would go in and hear her side first before an all fund blazing approach.

Tailtwister Sat 16-Feb-13 18:19:52

YANBU, she was totally over the top and quite nasty. It was obviously a mistake and not a deliberate act of vandalism. I would be having words with the head teacher.

cansu Sat 16-Feb-13 18:20:36

Whilst this does sound a bit over the top, she will perhaps say that she is concerned that the children don't hurt themselves and others by doing something like this. Personally I wouldn't go in all guns blazing. Focus instead on how you would feel if your ds had been hit on the head by the branch and sustained a concussion or perhaps if he had fallen and hurt himself possibly breaking an arm or something when he landed on the playground. I expect you may then want the school to take firm action and may well feel they weren't supervising properly. I doubt that she has taken the action she has because she has nothing to do on a Friday afternoon.

frustratedworkingmum Sat 16-Feb-13 18:21:08

OTT on behalf of the teacher - but had he been repeatedly told not to swing from the branch?

Not normal boy behaviour, normal BAD behaviour.

I would not be happy though and i would be wanting an explanation, i would not be going about it "loudly" though, as this is also not "normal parent behaviour"

zwischenzug Sat 16-Feb-13 18:21:17

Swinging on a branch is completely unacceptable? Ffs what sort if society are we turning into, reminds me of that daft bint who screamed "omg I touched a tree" on I'm a celeb a couple of years back. Its a fucking tree, interacting with nature is a normal life experience.

HollyBerryBush Sat 16-Feb-13 18:21:59

Could I just pick up on this though undiagnosed SN is my mother's gut instinct - if you think he has needs, please get him referred and diagnosed.

All this undiagnosed hypothesis tends to equal making excuses in my book.

As you were .grin

fluffywhitekittens Sat 16-Feb-13 18:23:19

It sounds like a bit too much taking him to every classroom.
But I don't agree that swinging from a tree branch in the school playground is acceptable. What if he'd hurt himself? What if he'd hurt someone else?

PrettyKitty1986 Sat 16-Feb-13 18:23:55

No it's not "normal boy behaviour" - it's completely unacceptable.

Really? I would say it was completely normal, and only naughty if the children have already specifically been told not to swing on the trees. My two boys are relatively well house-trained. They know it's naughty to climb on furniture, swing on things inside...but outside is fair game.
They will climb on trees, over boulders, jump off things. What's so bad about swinging on a tree, assuming they've not been warned to leave it alone?

OverReactionMuch Sat 16-Feb-13 18:26:11

He had not climbed the tree. The branch was low hanging. She did not mention he had been told not to do it and DS said all his friends were doing it. When the branch came off a girl told the teacher.

LilQueenie Sat 16-Feb-13 18:26:52

its health and safetly crap so they dont get sued. seriously how many of you would be fine with your DC's being allowed to play and if they get unintentionally hurt then see it as a thing that just thappens at times. you know like in the 70's/80's and before. I hate when people make claims because they 'are entitled to lots of cash' Its hardly helping in most cases.

Are children supervises outside in the playground? I remember when the gates were locked and we ran out to play at school. No wonder kids cant do anything for themselves much, society has then under big brother!

whiteflame Sat 16-Feb-13 18:27:33

How do you know she has taken him round the classes?

LilQueenie Sat 16-Feb-13 18:28:08

What if he'd hurt himself? What if he'd hurt someone else?

ITs what happens when kids play sometimes. confused

HollyBerryBush Sat 16-Feb-13 18:29:10

They should have trimmed the bloody trees if they don't want perfectly normal behaviour of 5/6/7yo's dangling upside down from something.

This reminds me a story in the local press of an equally batty headmistress, making all the 6th formers march round the school field perimeter following a crucifix she held aloft, on the grounds they'd all bunked mass that morning. She was sacked eventually, for excluding non catholics on the grounds they refused to watch pro life films.

fluffywhitekittens Sat 16-Feb-13 18:29:26

This was in a school playground though, not a country park. If one child can swing on a tree branch then surely they all can, all at the same time maybe? What's the likelihood of someone getting hurt?

Smartiepants79 Sat 16-Feb-13 18:29:31

Can I just ask how you know what happened at school?
Make sure that your info is accurate before you speak to them.
As a teacher I would say try and be as calm as you can manage. Express distress rather than anger as it gets a better reaction.
Anger and accusations tend to make people defensive and can mean they stop listening properly to your justifiable concerns about the impact on your child.
If what you have said is correct it does seem a bit of an overreaction and insensitive given your sons concerns.

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