Alleged 'rape' - how the news reports attacks on men and women differently

(23 Posts)
TheBlackRider Tue 26-May-15 07:06:49

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TheBlackRider Tue 26-May-15 07:07:56

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ChunkyPickle Tue 26-May-15 07:13:47

Is that really the case with the BBC? I remember this coming up a few months ago, and when I went and looked they actually reported assaults/rapes the same factual way, and none in an 'inverted commas' way.

In fact just doing a search (horrible in itself) shows that to be the case.

Not that I haven't seen that style of reporting in other places, but I think the BBC has pulled its socks up here

gallicgirl Tue 26-May-15 07:15:31

I noticed this about reporting on the rape by 2 Libyan soldiers last year. It came to court recently and although the victim had been drunk, this wasn't dwelled on in the same way as it would if the victim were female.

I don't want to minimise this the horror felt by this chap or suggest women are hurt more, but there definitely seemed to be a different sentiment when reporting the male rape. More serious perhaps.

TheBlackRider Tue 26-May-15 07:16:44

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TheBlackRider Tue 26-May-15 07:19:38

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TheBlackRider Tue 26-May-15 07:48:52

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sausageeggbacon11 Tue 26-May-15 09:30:25

Just reading the BBC about the Libyans and it says "when the alleged attacks took place in October" so they still use alleged even in male rape it seems here

Anniegetyourgun Tue 26-May-15 10:41:09

^ although the victim had been drunk, this wasn't dwelled on in the same way as it would if the victim were female^

It's all about the presumed state of consent, isn't it? A (straight) man is presumed not to want to consent to penetrative sex even if he is too drunk to actively refuse it. When you try to suggest that the same may apply to a woman you get sort of blinked at in a "does not compute" way.

TheBlackRider Tue 26-May-15 12:58:44

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PuffinsAreFictitious Tue 26-May-15 17:13:32

BBC is bloody awful in some of it's reporting.

'Alleged' is fine, because there has to be a presumption of innocence until proven guilty, but they do have a habit of putting 'rape' in inverted commas, which suggests to most people a level of skepticism.

They insist on referring to child pornography. There's no such thing as child pornography, it is filmed CSA, drives me batty!They seem to do it every time, and it takes people tweeting and emailing to get them to edit it, they still do it the next time though!

TheBlackRider Tue 26-May-15 18:16:21

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TheBlackRider Tue 26-May-15 18:33:23

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LassUnparalleled Tue 26-May-15 20:20:15

I suppose they have to use "alleged" where the issue is whether or not the sex was concensual e.g Ched Evans and where it patently could not have been say the Ealing vicarage case.

In the latter and similar cases the investigation is about identifying and tracking down a perpetrator. His defence will be it wasn't him, not that it wasn't rape.

In the former the perpetrator is already known. If they report "x" is accused of rape I don't think they can avoid saying the "alleged attack".

The inverted comma is not acceptable in either situation.

TheBlackRider Tue 26-May-15 21:12:22

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TheBlackRider Tue 26-May-15 21:14:50

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WhirlpoolGalaxyM51 Tue 26-May-15 22:08:53

I do notice the frequency that women are "raped" which to me reads with a total hmm, while you never read of people being "burgled" "stabbed", having their child "abducted" or their bicycle "stolen".

I don't know if there is a difference in the frequency of "" with sex of victim, you'd need to clock it over some months religiously and count it all carefully including circs. I wouldn't be surprised if you found a difference as well between certain types of victim and whether they were raped or "raped".

TheBlackRider Tue 26-May-15 22:19:24

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WhirlpoolGalaxyM51 Tue 26-May-15 22:31:26

How is it treated when men are sexually assaulted by women I wonder. Not something that's in the news very often but I'd be willing to put money on it not being treated with much seriousness.

Whole setup is shit isn't it.

YY when men are victims of men there is no enormous background given with well the victim did xyz, it always seems to be a much more factual report, with this happened, here, at this time.

TheBlackRider Tue 26-May-15 22:34:34

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WhirlpoolGalaxyM51 Tue 26-May-15 22:38:15

Oh god yes true about teachers. The boys are deemed to be "lucky" by large segments of society which is grim. When it's a female victim and a male teacher the gist is that poor man you can't blame him type stuff. Different. Of course different if the child is pre pubescent.

All of this is rubbish isn't it. The classification of victims and perpetrators, it's awful and so damaging.

TheBlackRider Tue 26-May-15 22:48:56

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WhirlpoolGalaxyM51 Tue 26-May-15 22:54:37

YY all of that.

Once you've started seeing it you can't stop noticing.

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