hungry baby milk help

(14 Posts)
pinkie1982 Thu 24-Mar-16 13:37:38

Hi.
My sister has bought my baby milk for me and got the hungry baby one. He is nine months old and weaning, eating three meals a day. He still has five bottles in 24 hours and is normally on first stage milk.
Will giving this hungrier milk be ok?

murphyslaws Thu 24-Mar-16 13:38:50

He should be on second stage milk from 6 months. Any reason he is still on first stage

NeedACleverNN Thu 24-Mar-16 13:40:23

Actually Murphy, health visitors now say do not change to stage 2 milk but stay on stage 1.

There's no real difference between the two

murphyslaws Thu 24-Mar-16 13:42:58

Mine is 10 months old. And health visitor and doctor both said after 6 months change as it has more iron and zinc in it .

Maybe different areas different ideas

murphyslaws Thu 24-Mar-16 13:44:18

It's also still on NHS website. And other baby nutrients websites because of the added extra.

pinkie1982 Thu 24-Mar-16 13:45:52

Thanks. Yes HV advises against it. Says that it contains more iron but he should be getting enough from his normal diet. Also said that it is made sweeter and can cause tooth damage. They (three HVs) have all said that he can stay on stage 1 milk for 12m until I move him to cows milk completely

NeedACleverNN Thu 24-Mar-16 13:46:10

Hmmm weird

My youngest is 12 months and we was told as long as he is still drinking formula, keep them on the first stage confused

murphyslaws Thu 24-Mar-16 13:47:37

Need I have the answer.....

If health visitors and doctors contradict each other then eventually one will be right.

NeedACleverNN Thu 24-Mar-16 13:48:25

Always the way wink

Jw35 Thu 24-Mar-16 14:39:07

Hungry baby formula exists so it can be advertised and sold with discounts etc. it's not necessary to switch it's all hype.

Questionsagaintoday Fri 25-Mar-16 04:37:11

The NHS clearly states that you DONT need to switch to what is marketed as follow on formula st 6 months. The NHS leaflet on introducing solids Also states it.

Formula companies are not allowed to market infant formula. The invention of follow on or stage 2 formula is to bypass this law. The NHS is very clear about this.

Breastmilk, or if that's unavailable, then first infant formula is just fine as part of the weaning diet.

Questionsagaintoday Fri 25-Mar-16 04:43:08

jw35 I think you meant to say follow on or stage 2 formula. Hungry baby formulas under 6 months are legally just the same as regular infant milks and cannot be advertised. They are casein based rather than whey based and take longer to digest hence keeping a baby fuller for longer.

Follow on milks/stage 2 milks are the advertising invention and are not needed. Adding iron to calcium rich items like milk is pointless as the iron doesn't get absorbed and much of it is biologically unavailable. That's why the NHS go out of their way to mention that you do not need to switch to follow in milk after six months.

Questionsagaintoday Fri 25-Mar-16 04:43:09

jw35 I think you meant to say follow on or stage 2 formula. Hungry baby formulas under 6 months are legally just the same as regular infant milks and cannot be advertised. They are casein based rather than whey based and take longer to digest hence keeping a baby fuller for longer.

Follow on milks/stage 2 milks are the advertising invention and are not needed. Adding iron to calcium rich items like milk is pointless as the iron doesn't get absorbed and much of it is biologically unavailable. That's why the NHS go out of their way to mention that you do not need to switch to follow in milk after six months.

Questionsagaintoday Fri 25-Mar-16 04:43:09

jw35 I think you meant to say follow on or stage 2 formula. Hungry baby formulas under 6 months are legally just the same as regular infant milks and cannot be advertised. They are casein based rather than whey based and take longer to digest hence keeping a baby fuller for longer.

Follow on milks/stage 2 milks are the advertising invention and are not needed. Adding iron to calcium rich items like milk is pointless as the iron doesn't get absorbed and much of it is biologically unavailable. That's why the NHS go out of their way to mention that you do not need to switch to follow in milk after six months.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now