Can horse feed make dogs ill?

(10 Posts)
DorsetLass Wed 26-Jun-13 08:37:58

Apologies for posting this here - but am not a horse expert an thought one if you may be able to advise.

Recently our lab has been peeing blood - it started when our dog walker started taking him to the stables twice a week. He scavenges/steals anything he can find. Deposite allot of investigations nothing has been found to cause it. Oddly, since he has stopped going near the stables the blood has stopped. Could anything at the stables have been causing it? Horse feed he found/anything else? Vets have drawn a blank!

Thank you in advance for your advice.

Lovesswimming Wed 26-Jun-13 09:40:21

hi, I have never experienced this and have horses at home. one dog I have sticks her head in one of the horses feed and helps herself whilst that horse is eating (I do call her away as soon as lol)
however I keep my stored feed safely away. if anyone at the stables feeds anything like sugarbeet it comes dried. if it is eaten dried theres a chance it could expand in your dog's throat or stomach. there are other feeds that are soaked as well. it should be safe if in a feed but not safe if taken from a stored area or spilt in a feed room and your dog had got it. I have absolutely no idea if it would cause your dogs symptoms, I'd be going to the vet if I saw blood in wee (as you did) if your vet has drawn a blank maybe go with her to the stables and see what is happening and is around?
also do they put mouse/rat poison down? they did at any stables I have ever been on.
have any of the fields been sprayed with weedkiller and your dog been on it, ate some grass?
I cant think of anything else other than if its a busy yard and kids are leaving things around?
theres also a dog section in Horse and Hound forum, most there have horses and dogs like here so keep asking someone may have experienced this.

smilingthroughgrittedteeth Wed 26-Jun-13 09:46:46

My dog is a collie x lab and eats anything she can get her paws on.

She's always stealing the horse food and I've never noticed any problems, I feed sugar beet which she has occasionally stolen and eaten before I've got it off of her and again no problems.

I would agree that it could possibly be weed killer or possibly rat poison if they have a vermin problem or perhaps one of the horses is on medication which your dog has got hold of.

Littlebigbum Wed 26-Jun-13 10:55:50

A friend has a big problem with corn on the cob, see use to feed chicken if the dogs eat it, it blocks the intestines. My golden retriever also eats anything including sweet cob no problems.
If it has stopped let him back to the stable and see if it starts again. And ask about rat poison/ weed killer before.

Mirage Wed 26-Jun-13 19:58:56

Our farm dogs eat horse,cattle and sheep feed with no problems.I'm a gardener and have never heard of any weedkillers causing this problem,rat/mouse poison is more likely as anything containing Warfarin thins the blood and vermin bleed to death.

Pixel Wed 26-Jun-13 20:52:47

Is it possible that he's got hold of something with horse wormer in it? Either feed or poo, since a lot of dogs do eat horse poo (and labs are quite partial to it if my sister's is anything to go by). Horse wormers are extremely dangerous to dogs.

Pixel Wed 26-Jun-13 20:56:03

Or possibly any other drug that a horse might have been given that could cause those symptoms in a dog. You might have to do some detective work and ask around the yard before speaking to the vet.

Stinkyminkymoo Sun 30-Jun-13 21:48:39

Unlikely to be feed, but it could be hoof clippings left over from the farrier..?

I know it makes dogs sick if they eat too much but it could be that?

Stinkyminkymoo Sun 30-Jun-13 21:49:30

Of course unless he's stealing a pre prepared feed with drugs in it?

Yes it can - several of us discovered this last year, not to much the food but the herbal treats you can get will make dogs really sick

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