just re-homed my dog

(11 Posts)
rhetorician Sun 31-Jan-16 17:25:22

I know it was the right thing to do; she's 9 months, a terrier/min pin cross, and the interactions between my kids and the dog weren't really helping her. My DD1 in particular, whilst she adored the dog and is now distraught, just could not learn to respect the dog's space or back off when the dog signalled (why, I do not know). So before things got irredeemable we found her a new home - lovely older lady with 3 dogs (one of whom turned out to be ddog's sister). I'm gutted, I made a mistake (a reasonable one, but a mistake nonetheless). I know some of you will flame me and I probably deserve it. I really hope she has a happy life now.

Peppaismyhomegirl Sun 31-Jan-16 17:28:25

I don't judge you. We have a 5 month old puppy and it is way harder than I thought it would be. Not so much the puppy, but DS and the puppy. I don't know what will make him click and calm down towards her: he loves her, but just gets so excited and the puppy ends up nipping him. I was hoping talking DS along with me to puppy classes would help but he just gets even more excited there. I know that must of been a hard desision to make. It was a responsible one tho

rhetorician Sun 31-Jan-16 17:37:19

that's exactly it Peppa and it's really about the combined temperaments of the dog and the child. My younger daughter was far less interested in the dog and their interactions far less problematic. This dog was absolutely lovely and would have been just fine if it was just me and DP - and the days when it was just us, she was grand - pottered about, played - not a bother. But ddog would start going nuts whenever DD1 came near, play-biting her feet etc. How old is your DS? There's some good resources for kids out there, but fact of the matter is that training a puppy involves a lot of boring repetition (from a child's point of view), consistency and calmness and not all children can manage that

insan1tyscartching Sun 31-Jan-16 19:19:34

I'm sorry you have had to rehome your dog. When Eric was a puppy I found it really difficult at times as well. His nipping reached a peak at about five months and it was easier after that well until he got to the stroppy adolescent stage anyway. Our youngest was 11 when we had him and I'm glad we waited until she was old enough to be sensible and reliable around a dog because I'm sure having a young child and a puppy would have been unbearable for me. Eric is two now and a delight most of the time and the puppy trials are mostly forgotten (well not forgotten enough to know we will never have another puppy any other dogs here will be rescued adults)

rhetorician Sun 31-Jan-16 19:31:11

insanity I hope that we will be able to get a dog at some point in her childhood because she loves dogs so much. But like you, it will not be a puppy

KiwiJude Mon 01-Feb-16 01:03:24

Absolutely no judgement from me, you did the best thing for your dog and saved her from becoming, in one way or another, a statistic. Whenever our dog is out in public I make sure he is never in a situation where things can go bad, I can't imagine having to live with it at home as well.

rhetorician Mon 01-Feb-16 09:45:03

thanks Kiwi I'm really surprised at how upset I am and how much I miss her - but I know she will have a really happy life with constant company (canine and human) and interactions that will not stress her. She was such a good dog really - smart, cheeky, easy to train. I will miss her terribly sad

rhetorician Thu 04-Feb-16 09:21:04

just had lovely text from the lady who took ddog to say how much they love her and how well she has settled in. Plus picture of her snoozing with her sister. I can't help thinking that we should have just battled it out really, but then I have a day like today where we all leave the house at 9 and wouldn't be back, except very briefly until 5. That's just not fair on a dog. Still devastated and trying to see a way to be at home more so that I can have another in a year or so sad

AnUtterIdiot Thu 04-Feb-16 12:08:57

Puppies are really, really hard. I only have adult experience of one puppy - not mine but a family member who I spent a lot of time with - and the playbiting was actually unbearable (to be fair he was a giant breed which added an extra dimension of awfulness). She ended up having to rehome him for various reasons. It wasn't an easy decision because he was actually a sweetie at heart and just being what he was, if you see what I mean. He's now with people who have proper experience of a giant breed and it is a much better home for him. I always wanted a puppy when I was a kid but as an adult I have always preferred older dogs. Once your DD is ready to respect a dog's boundaries she will be just as happy with an older dog smile

KiwiJude Thu 04-Feb-16 19:29:03

It's tough rhet, and really hard to not second guess yourself for making a good decision.

taptonaria27 Sat 06-Feb-16 23:12:30

I'm in a similar position and have surprised my self how heartbroken I have been even though we were all a little scared bit scared of him

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