Here some suggested organisations that offer expert advice on SN.

I have no clue how to handle this

(5 Posts)
Boodles84 Sun 22-May-16 12:08:49

I suspect my son has ASD, he is 7 and has always been a challenging boy. I've posted a couple of threads about it recently as u feel like there is a lightbulb going off in my head. I have approached the GP & School. The school have only noticed anxiety so far (he hasn't been at that school long) the GP read through my list of concerns and has referred us to a paediatrician.
He is getting increasingly more violent, I am covered in bruises and so is his little sister. I can't seem to do or say anything right, it all just kicks him off. I've bought a meditation cd and am using that as much as he will allow, I'm trying to talk to him more about his feelings and get to the bottom of things. He is quite manipulative at times though and sometimes I dont feel he's being honest.
These violent outbursts are happening more often and out in public also. He is reducing me to tears daily and I'm getting scared of him.
Please tell me what I can do, I feel like I'm losing my mind!

PolterGoose Sun 22-May-16 12:17:15

I would suggest you start by reading 'The Explosive Child* and trying the techniques.

Reduce demands, keep life as easy and anxiety free as possible, think about predictability and routine.

Keep a detailed diary to help spot triggers and patterns. Don't do stuff which raises anxiety and leads to explosions.

Verbena37 Mon 23-May-16 10:27:04

As poltergoose said, try to give zero demands (or as few as possible) to reduce his anxiety. The behaviours he is presenting may seem naughty and violent but it may be his way of coping with the frustration of how he is feeling. So for example, saying "I'd be really impressed if you could time how long it takes to get dressed this morning" rather than "go and get dressed". That's just an example but it worked really well with my DS.

When he is calm, try to ask him how he feels he would be able to relax and calm down at times when he is really worried. Perhaps he could go and sit in his den or play cards, or play Minecraft or anything that he,so reduce his stress. It's harder to achieve that in the moment of a melt down though but if you've already chatted about it, he may remember and be able to help himself calm down.

zzzzz Mon 23-May-16 11:08:48

What do you mean by "I've posted a couple of threads about it recently as u feel like there is a lightbulb going off in my head. I have approached the GP & School. The school have only noticed anxiety so far"?

Youarenotkiddingme Mon 23-May-16 20:53:21

Another adding support. Can't add more than the above re reducing demands as a start.
You can't start working on new things until he's in a place ready to learn and engage with them.

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