No secondary school suitable for dd

(10 Posts)
twistyfeet Sun 30-Jun-13 17:02:57

she has severe physical needs - cerebral palsy, visually impaired and cant speak but is very bright. Right now she is in a mainstream with a resource base and easily keeps up with her non disabled classmates. There is nowhere for her to go at secondary. All the SN schools are for children with LD's and offer no chance to do GCSE's/A levels and not one mainstream in the city can cope with her severe physical disabilities (or so they say).
What the fuck do we do? She wants an education the same as any other child. The LEA seem to think its ok for her to go to an SN school and be taught 'life skills' and do no exams but she'd be bored out of her mind and immensely fustrated and why should she settle for that? She's more than capable of going to university later on.
What on earth do I do. She has a right to an education.

chauffeurmummy Sat 06-Jul-13 23:18:24

Oh bless you both - I am afraid I have absolutely no sensible advice but saw no one had responded to your post so just wanted to at least send you some hugs (however Mumsnetty that may be). Really hope someone comes one that can help you practically as I 100% agree that your daughter deserves the education that she wants and can deal with. Can her current school not help at all? Does the head not have links with senior schools in the area?

TOWIELA Sun 07-Jul-13 09:43:58

Is there an independent school which can meet her needs? Does she have a Statement?

If no state school can meet her needs then make your LA fund a place at an independent school. Easier said than done and you will have to jump through a lot of hoops! But it can be done.

twistyfeet Sun 07-Jul-13 20:01:22

she has a statement. I didnt realise they could fund an independant school. THere's a lad very like her at a private school who accomodate his needs extremely well. Even that would be cheaper than sending her away to somewhere like Treloars which we do not want to do.

Riv Tue 16-Jul-13 21:57:28

Sorry I've just stumbled on this thread. Hope it's not too late.
At the risk of posting this too often - Check out the IPSEA website. (Honestly, I don't work for them or have any connection, I am a special school teacher and know several mums who have found their support invaluable).
You need to check out the "SEN code of practice" (the law and guidance) - you can download it via the ipsea page tagged "what you need to know.” They also have a briefing sheet "LA not naming the secondary school you want" with clear guidance on how to appeal against the school that the authority have named in your DD's statement. (I assume they have named the special school by amending her statement at an annual review as they are required to do, not just by writing a letter to you)
Good luck.

feelthelies Thu 15-Aug-13 21:48:15

They have to meet her academic and social needs and will have to pay for an indie if they don't have one that works. A mainstream secondary school local to me had to put in ramps and lifts for a child who successfully appealed to get in. Cost loads but is now almost fully accessible.

fasparent Thu 29-Aug-13 01:30:40

contact your Parent partnership should be able too access additional LEA funding , will help school secure additional support , Not good but have too fight , our daughter we home schooled in the end only place they could provide was a children's centre, really excelled in college though so all was worth it , got a job own car and independent now.

MaddestMother Sun 01-Sep-13 08:36:45

My parents had this same issue in the early 80's when my older sister was going to secondary. The LEA wanted to send her to a boarding school for DC with SEN but she was very bright with physical disabilities. In the end, it went all the way to the top but they won and the local school had adaptations put in place to support her and she had a carer in school.
I can't believe this still happens, every child is entitled to an appropriate education.

manishkmehta Sat 07-Dec-13 19:14:37

If you want mainstream the remind your lea of 316 and 316(a) and

IN THE UPPER TRIBUNAL ADMINISTRATIVE APPEALS CHAMBER
Before UPPER TRIBUNAL JUDGE WARD,
Bury Metropolitan Borough Council v SU [2010] UKUT 406 (AAC)

Specifically

64. I acknowledge that professionals with considerable experience hold the view that A’s interests would be better served by attendance at a special school. Like the First-tier Tribunal, I do not have to decide whether that view is right or not. Parliament has given a strongly entrenched primacy to mainstream education. Whether that approach is the most appropriate one in order to help children such as A would have to be a matter for Parliament.

Thanks
www.sen4u.com

YomAsalYomBasal Sat 07-Dec-13 19:17:29

Whereabouts in the country are you, OP?

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