How to deal with this?

(31 Posts)

This is going to sound like bragging - it really isn't, I am genuinely concerned. dd6 is pretty smart - and I am sick to death with her coming home from school fed up and miserable with the 'easy' work they are doing in year 2. She came home today with a book she had, in her words 'sneaked out to read' - it's a treetops level 14 book and she has just finished it. There is no gitted and talented register at her school - all groups are mixed ability and her homework is along the lines of 'recite to a family member the 5 times table up to 100' I have posted before that we are putting her in for a prep school exam - she took the pre test last week and we have been advised that she will have no problem passing it...but at the moment, she is getting more and more miserable and sick of going in to school and being, sorry to use the word, bored.

I just wondered if anyone had any advice on how I can help her. I have spoken to her teacher but she just tuts and repeats the 'mixed ability' policy. I want to help, so please don;t flame me sad

Interesting point.

PropositionJoe Sat 06-Oct-12 17:31:43

Nah, they can still get plenty of downtime, just have interesting things to do with their parents. Massive jigsaws that take all week can be good, too.

I think what I will do is give it this week. If she is still coming home miserable, I'm going to chat to the SENCO ( she has a hearing impairment as well btw - which they are all aware of and she has been visited by a ToD etc- another story) and just ask if they have any provision, if they are aware that she is feeling a little left out etc, and take it from there. At least then I will know I have done something. Meanwhile, I'll carry on encouraging her and doing 'stuff' as we normally do! Thanks for all your input.

rrbrigi Mon 08-Oct-12 11:19:28

Hi,

I think there are lots of things you can do at home. My son is in school and I think he is clever but instead of doing high level math and reading or any other things that school will cover with him; at home we do different things. How about to learn to play on an instrument, learn touch typing, learn another language (that she won't learn in school), etc... You can tell me that you need money for all of these things, but the reality is you do not. Nowadays if you have computer and internet you can learn everything, yes I mean everything. E.g.: we learn languages from youtube. I think this is the way how parents should stretch their clever children, so they won't be bored in school when they learn the same as others. Also you can let her read lots of education books about the world, animals, plants, arts, science etc... You need only a library card for these. Or you can give her books that belong to the subject they are learning in school (e.g.: they learnt that dog has four legs, you can give a book for her about different type of dogs etc.).

SE13Mummy Mon 08-Oct-12 22:10:14

When you've spoken to her teacher have you explained that your DD is keen to find out more about the subject and that you'd like to support her with this in a way that means she hasn't 'gone ahead' and so ends up excluded from the next session, but has explored one aspect in more depth?

Perhaps researching buildings and recreating a model of a London street pre Fire of London would be something she could do - she could then analyse the differences between homes/streets now and then. Or maybe look into from a plague point of view e.g. why it was that people believed the different 'cures' would work - what was it about medicine in those days that led people to think that carrying flowers would help cure the plague? Perhaps consider the ethics of marking the door of afflicted households with a cross... can she find out about other times in history/recent times that isolation/obvious identification of the ill was carried out? If the Fire of London were to happen in 2012 what would be different.... look into the history of the Fire Service, go back to thinking about street layout, could it happen? Why/why not?

Have a look at Glogster (the edu version) and at Weebly - one is a graphic blog, the other a website builder. Both offer free versions and I've used both in my teaching (with Y4+ but my own Y2 DD uses both proficiently). A tool such as one of these would offer your DD an extra challenge but also enable her to expand her work as and when something grabs her or she discovers another tangent she'd like to explore. She could be encouraged to add 'school facts' to it so that there is an additional reason to engage with her learning at school - it may even be the case that she'd be given an opportunity to share it at school (or could send an e-mail link to the Head!).

Just a thought... You say your dd has a hearing impairment. Could it be that she isn't fully hearing/accessing what is going on in the class and is switching off a little bit? Her previous teacher may have been better at making sure she could always hear/contribute in class and was therefore focused and learning? I may be way off...

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