Removing heat marks

(8 Posts)
wowfudge Wed 28-Sep-16 13:48:19

I just wanted to share a tip I found online for removing heat marks from varnished furniture. You need an iron and a folded cotton cloth or pillowcase with a bigger area than the iron's soleplate.

Put the cloth over the mark and put the iron on - the temperature needs to be low, comfortable enough to put your hand on the base for about 20-30 seconds before you need to move it. I started at our iron's minimum temperature and increased it a little to achieve this. No steam if it's a steam iron. Then just put the iron over the covered mark. Leave it alone - no need to constantly move it, but the key is to let it work slowly. I kept going to check periodically and could tell this was working. It won't damage the furniture as it just isn't hot enough and the cloth absorbs and distributes some of the heat . After several hours this had removed two huge round marks from an antique table and I've started on the marks on top of an eBay bargain cabinet.

The reason this works is because the marks are caused by the heat in whatever was set down on the furniture drawing moisture up from within the wood, but the moisture is then trapped below the surface finish, leaving cloudy marks. When you use an iron like this it slowly draws the trapped moisture through into the cloth.

Anyway, minimal effort and a bit of patience. No messing up the varnish, sanding or anything like that.

LyraMortalia Wed 28-Sep-16 21:29:38

Ooh that's fab I'm going to do that tomorrow thankyou

MargotLovedTom Wed 28-Sep-16 23:46:38

Heat marks as in rings from mugs etc?

Fabulous tip thanks, I will try it!

wowfudge Thu 29-Sep-16 06:56:09

It works, but is best done slowly over several hours. If nothing is happening, increase the heat a little bit.

shovetheholly Thu 29-Sep-16 08:00:03

I have a better one - use this

www.lakeland.co.uk/23955/Guardsman-Water-Ring-Remover-Cloth

It is absolutely brilliant, and it leaves the furniture with an amazing and very long-lasting sheen. Plus, you don't risk doing more damage with the iron being accidentally too hot.

user1475132199 Thu 29-Sep-16 08:09:34

Great tip will give that a try, i've been using this for ages now and it works a treat.

princessconsuelabannahammock Thu 29-Sep-16 08:21:03

I did this on a charity shop table and it came up a treat. I was skeptical. It took about a minute. I used a fairly hot iron and a thick towel folded over several times.

wowfudge Thu 29-Sep-16 15:37:22

It's easy, doesn't require any special products and is permanent. As long as you make sure the temp is low it is fine.

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