Staying in my home alone?

(3 Posts)
bofski14 Thu 30-Jun-16 17:24:37

I'll keep this brief.

Been with partner for 4 years. Have a two year old daughter. He promised to marry me many times but never did. I realise I'm in a vulnerable financial position.

He earns £50k as a contractor. I gave up my job to be a SAHM as he works all over the UK and I have no childcare.

We have a house worth £80k and we owe £62k on it. I've applied for the relevant benefits and maintainance for our daughter.

The Halifax have told me if I take his name off the mortgage (which he is happy to do if I give him the 8k deposit back) they will assess me as a new mortgage applicant and will reject me as I don't have a job. I have £15k in savings so nothing is too urgent yet. I just don't know what to do. Go to a solicitor and try to get an order to stay here until our daughter is 18 and leave his name on it until then, leave and rent somewhere with HB, buy him out when I return to work when our daughter is in school properly. I can manage the mortgage myself with the maintainance and benefits but I have to keep his name on it. Does anyone know if I can have Support for Mortgage Interest after the 39 week wait if his name is still on the mortgage? We have separate accounts, he doesn't live here anymore and he doesn't pay anything toward the mortgage officially though he has given me 6 months worth to tide me over.

What would you do?

dimots Thu 30-Jun-16 17:27:00

Some mortgage companies will accept child maintenance and tax credits as income. You could try a broker.

MrsBertBibby Fri 01-Jul-16 06:18:04

If you can't get his name off the mortgage and the lender won't transfer the property to your sole name while the mortgage remains joint, then you just have a declaration of trust setting out that you and your daughter have a right of occupation, and that he merely has an interest in the proceeds as and when you sell up.

Please don't get bullied into moving into rented, you and your daughter are lucky to have the chance of a secure home, the court if it went that far would let you stay.

See a solicitor, please!

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