Veggie kids

(73 Posts)
Jonesey1972 Wed 23-Mar-16 21:48:03

What do people think about bringing children up as vegetarians?

mrsmugoo Wed 23-Mar-16 21:50:07

If that's what they want to do then cool. Why not? You can get all your nutrients from non animal sources (except b12) so don't see what the issue is? confused

Junosmum Wed 23-Mar-16 22:18:38

You have to ensure a varied diet, but you do with all children. I'm a dedicated meat eater but it's up to you. Why?

SpeakNoWords Thu 24-Mar-16 03:04:34

It's fine. A (well planned) vegetarian diet is not lacking in anything and is completely suitable for children. Meat is not a food group and is not necessary for a healthy diet. What do you think about being vegetarian and having a vegetarian household?

(I will declare my interest in this, as I'm a vegetarian and so is my child as a result).

sonlypuppyfat Thu 24-Mar-16 04:39:16

My friend is vegetarian and so were her kids until she came home from work to find them frying bacon. I don't know it just seems a little off imposing what you want to eat onto other people

VinceNoirLovesHowardMoon Thu 24-Mar-16 05:14:56

What's your angle? These threads often get really annoying.

HeadDreamer Thu 24-Mar-16 05:22:35

Why do you ask? DH was brought up as a vegetarian and he is adamant DC aren't. He is pollo pescatarian now. But he doesn't want DC to notice he can't stomach the sausages or bacons. He prefers them to grow up without the good food/bad food issues he was brought up with. We aren't big meat eaters anyway and meat free half the week.

polkadotdelight Thu 24-Mar-16 06:12:54

18 month old DS is veggie as we both are but if he wants to eat the same food as his friends whenhe goes to school then we won't stop him. He has had a ham sandwhich once though, we were at a first birthday party and my friend gave it to him without thinking - a bit of an oops moment!

Salene Thu 24-Mar-16 06:18:15

I've been a veggie for 28 years now but I wouldn't bring my son up as one, Ithats a choice he can make when he is older if he so wishes. Also I'd worry too much about him getting all the nutrients he needs.

whattheseithakasmean Thu 24-Mar-16 06:31:36

Loads of vegetarian children all around the world (huge swathes of India, which has for more people than the UK).

I don't understand a veggie bringing up their child to eat meat. My children were weaned onto the family food, which does not include meat. We aren't a 'separate meals of chicken nuggets for children' household.

DH & I are both clear skinned, slim, fit and active with good jobs and have strong, healthy clever children who have never eaten a MacDonalds. Its great!.

Salene Thu 24-Mar-16 06:56:00

I cook meat regular because my husband isn't veggie, so it's me who eats the separate meals rather than other way round. I'm quite happy to handle it and cook it I just choose not to eat it. That said I don't feed my son cheap meat, everything it home cooked and from the buchers. I'm not sure I could feed him 10 for 99p sausages from say farmfoods etc

Nothing wrong with a child having a Macdonald ones in a blue moon, everything in moderation is my beliefs. A few fish fingers and chips never hurt anyone 😜

whattheseithakasmean Thu 24-Mar-16 06:59:16

Not going to give money to the evil empire myself.

Anyway, main point is that lots of children around the world are vegetarian, there is no need to feed your child meat except for your own convenience. My girls are nearly grown up, so it is up to them what they eat now, but it hasn't been a problem through their childhood as we are a veggie family.

BadDoGooder Thu 24-Mar-16 07:07:58

My whole household is veggie. I have been veggie for 20years, DP for 30 and my Dad for nearly 50 years. My brother has just gone vegan. It would be weird if DS wasn't veggie. I believe it is the best balance, as he can still choose to eat meat when he is older.
No food issues here either, it's a purely ethical choice, just like my choices to avoid other things I think are unethical.

I got loads of crap at first, constantly told DS would be ill/skinny/wouldn't grow properly etc. Now he's nearly 4, clearly v healthy, having started from 5lb at full term, he is now tall for his age, and incredibly strong, it seems to have shut the critics up! smile

Placeinthesun Thu 24-Mar-16 07:09:57

Ex H and I both veggies, well pescetarian as we both eat a bit fish but kids not that keen on fish.... Neither of us know how to cook meat having been veggies since being teenagers so our 3 kids are veggies by default. 3 strapping DS's, rarely ill, all tall. I make sure protein content in our food is high with lots of lentils and pulses. None of the boys seem fussed about eating meat so will see how that pans out when they're older. Eldest (10) is adamant that he doesn't want to eat meat ever, his twin brothers (8)are a little more ambivalent but all happy with our diet and choose a veggie option or fish fingers on very rare outings to somewhere like Mc D's. They all often get involved with cooking and one of the twins is a keen chef, I hope they will choose to remain veggie as I think it is a healthy diet but it will be up to them. Was very surprised when people did express concern about us raising our kids veggies when they've always just had the same meals as either parent, would seem odd to me to be buying and prepping meat just for the kids.

VeryPunny Thu 24-Mar-16 07:10:57

My children are 3rd generation vegetarians. I don't see the problem to be honest.

BadDoGooder Thu 24-Mar-16 07:12:26

Should add that DP's 2 adult daughters were brought up veggie, are still veggie now, and have never had food issue, or a problem with being brought up vegetarian. They are two of the healthiest, cleverest, most beautiful women I have ever met (not saying it's all down to vegetarianism, just pointing out it doesn't seem to have affected them adversely!)

MarvellousCake Thu 24-Mar-16 07:15:04

My DD is veggie by choice, since age 5ish. The rest of us aren't. It's not a problem - why would it be? She has had a (veggie) McDonald's though wink

DrWhy Thu 24-Mar-16 07:16:10

My DH has been veggie since the age of 10 and now gets a very upset stomach if he accidentally has something with meat. I can only assume this is because his body just isn't used to processing it. I am a fussy meat eater (will only eat locally sourced, outdoor reared type meat) so effectively pescitarian outside the house. The plan is to raise our child with the small amounts of 'as ethical as possible' meat that I eat to ensure they do have a true choice in future.

Fraggled Thu 24-Mar-16 07:16:54

Veggie household here. We are all healthy and happy, my children know they are free to eat whatever they like at school/restaurants etc. but we won't cook meat or fish at home.

So far they have never wanted to eat any meat or fish. I don't see any problem with it, and I don't feel Ive imposed anything on my children. It's natural for children to eat what the parents eat, I think. So long as it's a varied and healthy diet.

chunkymum1 Thu 24-Mar-16 09:45:19

All veggie household. DC have school dinners and go to parties/friends houses/school trips etc and have never had a problem getting suitable food. My DC are much less picky about their food then most of their meat eating friends.

I'm not sure why some people make such a fuss about veggie parents 'imposing' their views/diet on their DC- surely this is what every parent does about every aspect of their lifestyle until DC are old enough to decide for themselves.

I do have an issue with people who think that me/DC asking for the veggie option when we are out is an invitation to give us their view on my dietary and parenting choices. I would never give a lecture on why we don't eat meat to another parent so don't see why some people think it's OK to quiz me about mine. I'm more than happy to have a sensible discussion about it if someone's genuinely interested in the pros and cons of my choices but this is not usually the case.

I also have a problem with people who feel the need to tell me that my DC will be lacking in 'essential nutrients for growth' but can't tell me what these nutrients are (especially when they are feeding their DC plastic looking ham/chicken nuggets etc).

Ooh- that was cathartic.

What's your interest in this OP?

DurhamDurham Thu 24-Mar-16 09:55:13

DH & I are both clear skinned, slim, fit and active with good jobs and have strong, healthy clever children who have never eaten a MacDonalds. Its great!

Well if we are bragging so are we and we eat a big fat cooked breakfast most weekends and love a joint of lamb on a Sunday. Make of that what you will grin

originalmavis Thu 24-Mar-16 10:02:06

I'm veggie, DS will eat anything. I chose to be veggie 30 years ago, so if DS decides to go that way fine. He likes some veggie things (tofu) but thats down to eating in places like Wagamamas.

My issue is with meaties who a) say they are vegetarian then order the chicken, and b) won't eat 'cute' animals (lamb, rabbit...). But hey, each to their own.

BadDoGooder Thu 24-Mar-16 10:13:57

I do have an issue with people who think that me/DC asking for the veggie option when we are out is an invitation to give us their view on my dietary and parenting choices. I would never give a lecture on why we don't eat meat to another parent so don't see why some people think it's OK to quiz me about mine. I'm more than happy to have a sensible discussion about it if someone's genuinely interested in the pros and cons of my choices but this is not usually the case.

YY to this chunkymum

Why, just why does dietary choice bother people so much?
I never comment on other peoples food, ever. So why does me ordering a veggie option for my son immediately require a comment along the lines of "ooh is he veggie? Is that healthy?" <head tilt> or "he won't grow properly" or my absolute favourite "his brain won't develop properly you know"
(all random strangers btw, my friends know better!)

Each to their own I say.

UmbongoUnchained Thu 24-Mar-16 10:24:32

My toddler is almost vegan by choice. Bloody nightmare.

originalmavis Thu 24-Mar-16 10:28:16

Hummous city then is it?

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