What would you class as intermediate or advanced knitting skills?

(7 Posts)
Orangeanddemons Sun 01-Nov-15 20:40:13

I've been asked to deliver some workshops in this area.

Cables? Colour work? Decreasing and increasing? Knitting in the round? ( I can only do this on circular needles) entrelac?

Any advice gratefully received.

JoffreyBaratheon Sun 01-Nov-15 22:22:09

I wouldn't say dec and inc were advanced, unless you went into great depth about the difference left and right leaning, why you'd use one sort or another if designing etc... Knitting in the round I'd put at intermediate. With circs and with dpns as many sock knitters for example, would prefer dpns - so if you can only use circs, you're probably not yet ready to teach that one anyway! I'd call advanced things like designing from scratch; grading patterns; possibly Fair Isle and some aspects of traditional knitting (say Shetland shawls/gansey knitting); tricks like jogless joins, shaping shawls; weird and wonderful cast ons like say German twisted, or casting on for a true moebius; Scandinavinan double knitting etc.

I write knitting books/magazines and do the odd workshop. I wouldn't teach techniques I haven't mastered thoroughly and had lots of experience with, myself. I've found that people knit with wildly different techniques which can hugely affect the way they tackle something in a work shop so also make sure you have more than a passing acquaintance with all the basic knitting styles like British v. continental, etc. You may have to adapt techniques as you go to take account of this. I'd ask this q on Ravelry on one of the big boards as you will probably get a wide and useful selection of responses.

PolterGoose Mon 02-Nov-15 20:22:10

What Joff said smile

I'm probably a fairly competent intermediate knitter, but have taught myself as and when I've had a desire to make something, so there's gaps, but I find working with dpns and small fiddly lots of shaping type knitting easy, can do cabling and I can make up patterns as I go, but wouldn't go near fairisle/intarsia, lace or anything off a chart.

Wirralmumof2 Mon 02-Nov-15 20:25:23

I have been knitting for a year. Taught myself from books

I can follow a pattern. Increase, decrease, cable, knit stuff with intentional holes in (!)
Knit socks on circular needles

So I think I'm an Intermediate knitter.

ButtonLoon Mon 02-Nov-15 20:38:35

I think I'm a competent advanced knitter, I'm partway through a two-colour brioche stitch hat with cables. I can do intarsia, fair isle, lace, adapt a sweater pattern to a different gauge.

I would expect a competent beginner to know how to knit, purl, increase and decrease, cast on and off, change rows of colour, and finish by weaving in ends. (Blankets, scarves, hats, etc.)

Intermediate stages could include colour work, cables, lace, and adapting patterns. Socks are excellent intermediate patterns as they involve (depending on the pattern) shaping through increases or decreases, fitting, slipping stitches, and picking up stitches, and interesting cast-on or cast-off techniques. Also smaller yarn and knitting in the round.

Orangeanddemons Mon 02-Nov-15 21:17:13

I was thinking of those who had just mastered casting on/ off and knit and purl. That is what I would call a beginner, someone who could probably knit a scarf.

gasman Tue 03-Nov-15 00:06:39

I would consider myself a solid intermediate.

I knit lots of socks and lace.

I can do jogless stripes and simple Stranded colour work. I've just taught myself to cable.

Things that scare me are intarsia and fair isle and how to add shaping for me into ore-existing patterns.
Things I can do that are easy but look fancy and would be worth teachinginclude beading lace and knitting jumpers top down in one piece....

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