In thinking it'sprobably best not to send your child to school fro WBD dressed as Hitler?

(112 Posts)
Peachy Fri 06-Mar-09 09:27:34

efore anyone says LOL I didn't get it wrong- DH pointed it out, I said oh no must be Charlie Chaplin or somesuch then kid took off coat toreveal lovingly embroidered swatiokas.

It did concern me that the Mummight be on here then I thought no! It isn't OK and its worth making a fuss over.

AIBU?

Does anyone elses thought processes runa long the lines of 'Oh a favourite literare character? no darling skip Roald Dahl, Seuss and Grimm.... we'll go for a genocidalmaniac instead! No chance of suplication there!'

FFS

seeker Sat 07-Mar-09 15:07:36

To be serious for a moment - I'm afraid that I would be one of the people unhappy about "military" stuff in school.

Notquitegrownup Sat 07-Mar-09 15:09:00

lol AS - are you going to elaborate?!

Slight hijack, Mrsgboring - the book you referred to is called the Wave. It is a really good book, based on a true story of a history teacher who wanted his 14/15 year old students to understand the war better, and his experiment got totally out of hand. It is not written to cause anyone to sympathise with the Nazi viewpoint however.

SalLikesCoffee Sat 07-Mar-09 15:21:51

I've been trying to think of any possible reasons why his parents would have sent him in / allowed him to choose a Hitler outfit, and up to two minutes ago, couldn't think of any.

Kimi's post did however make me wonder - maybe he reads warcraft books (which, imo, is a bit strange for a child of that age, but then again, I'm still very pfb-ish and would only give ds coloring in books until he's at least 19 wink ), and his dad does same as Kimi's dh or he saw something like that etc.

I still think it is bad style, but at least something in this line might explain how it happened in the first place? Well, I hope it is just bad judgment. Am a little shocked.

katiestar Sat 07-Mar-09 16:36:37

Seeker - then how would you explain that to any children of military families at the setting without being discriminatory
(we are not military by the way but there was a son of an RAF helicopter pilot at the setting )

seeker Sat 07-Mar-09 17:40:32

I would say - as I say about many things -that some things are appropriate for grown ups but not for children. I might also say if questioned further that some things are too serious for games.

Kimi Sat 07-Mar-09 20:57:39

Sal, despite DP having his rather strange hobby I would never ever dress my children as Hitler, I have only been to one display and was a bit shocked to see small children decked out in uniform English and Nazi.

I do not think I approve of DP dressing as a nazi (even for the purpose of education) DS1 has special needs and when I look at the jack boots DP has and the Gun (might add the gun is a real one from ww2 and who knows what evil it brought) it makes me shudder at the though of those boot crushing the skulls of children like my DS1 who did not fit the "norm" Hitler wanted to create. DPs stuff is shut in the shed and not allowed in the house.

I took my sons to the war museum, the holocaust exhibit is the most shocking thing I have ever seen.

Tidey Sat 07-Mar-09 21:02:04

Are you sure you haven't just been watching South Park? Cartman dressed up as Hitler for Halloween and everyone else was dressed as Chewbacca?

SalLikesCoffee Sat 07-Mar-09 21:09:26

Hi Kimi. Uhm (and you might not have taken this the wrong way anyway, just want to make sure ), I don't at all think what your dh is doing is strange etc - a friend of mine is doing this most weekends (or sound like that to me!), he knows more about history than anyone I know (hence the hobby I guess), and is not at all trivial about wars etc.

What I meant to say is maybe the kid saw this in a proper situation, and just liked the outfit etc as he likes that kind of books. Kind of how some kids like a Spiderman outfit, yet knows absolutely nothing of the story - just pretty colors iyswim.

If that is the kind of situation where this kid saw it (which I really hope as the alternative is so bad), any normal person (as you quite rightly say) wouldn't let kids dress up as Hitler, but maybe these parents just didn't think?

On war museum - yes, I went too and agree - it is brilliant but so utterly shocking, I kept wanting to cry. Same feeling when I visited the Khmer Rouge Killing Fields in Cambodia - it's just so heartbreaking.

If this was a teenager I would be defending him/her on a freedpm of speech issue - but a 7 year old? Even if it was the kid's idea having read some books set in the 1940s, smart parents would have steered the child in a different direction: the parents are either thick as shit or have a very wierd agenda.

katiestar Mon 09-Mar-09 11:43:40

I thought he was 11 (yr 6) not 7 ?

Peachy Mon 09-Mar-09 17:54:55

10 or 11 but sharinga classroom with 7-8-9 year olds as aprt of the scheme so thats part of the issue I think. Definitely upper primary (yr 5 /6 ) due to where they line up

I know what you eman SGB, if thought for a moment he ahd been given the info and decided upon it in an informed way. But then owould eb freedom of speech to tell im not to go near my boys as well, instea d of keeping schtumn to avoid upsetting the child: wit rights go repsonsibilities and all that wink

L:ike you said though- seriously odd parental behaviour.

10 or 11 is still too young to make an informed choice to do this (at 14 or so a kid would be old enough to take the consequences if he/she was set on doing it)
I remember a fellow student at uni dressing up as Hitler for some satirical thing or other, the point of it (for him) was that he was Jewish, and looked very classically Jewish.

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