AIBU to think that relationship problems are not a GP thing

(10 Posts)
alittlemoretodo Mon 06-Jun-16 19:47:09

Just that really, I have been searching mumsnet for people in similar situations to me and the consensus seems to be speak to my gp. I do have a medication review tomorrow since I take antidepressants but i just cant imagine discussing my marriage problems with my gp it just feels like its out of the range of anything she could help with. Is that just me?

GarlicSteak Mon 06-Jun-16 20:01:21

Relationships are extremely important to mental health. My (first!) breakdown was all about my horrid marriage and my insane boss. Therefore my talk with my GP was all about them. These days, it's relevant for my doctor to know I'm living alone, etc.

Yes, you should tell your doctor. You aren't seeking relationship guidance from her but letting her know what's causing your added stress!

She'll need to know as it informs her treatment strategy.

sepa Mon 06-Jun-16 20:05:29

My mum discussed her marriage break down with her GP. It was how she got reffered to counselling.
IMO, she very much needed to speak to her GP as it was affecting her mental health which is a GP thing

UterusUterusGhali Mon 06-Jun-16 20:08:51

I saw my GP after my husband left me as I needed something to help me sleep/calm the fuck down. I already had depression so I think it was wise to let him know my mental health had taken a turn for the worse.

CaspoFungin Mon 06-Jun-16 20:15:54

You should only go to the GP if it's something effecting your physical health, or something effecting your mental health, making you depressed etc. You shouldn't just go because you want some sort of unofficial counselling session and a cry.

Crispbutty Mon 06-Jun-16 20:18:02

My GP was one of the people who helped me most when I was in an abusive marriage. She arranged counselling, she gave me advice which was much better than the pussyfooting around that friends had done, and she gave me support.

Discobabe Mon 06-Jun-16 22:30:14

In some areas GPs can refer couples for marriage counselling? I think it's very relevant if your current mental health isn't at it's best and you're seeing her anyway.

GarlicSteak Mon 06-Jun-16 22:38:38

If a healthcare professional knows you're married, and you're having health problems of whatever description, they're likely to assume your home is a supportive environment where you can offload, be looked after and gently encouraged. If this doesn't describe your home they need to know it. Also, reactive stress/depression is a very real thing that sometimes calls for a different approach. So current problems that are new or worsening have a bearing on your treatment.

2rebecca Tue 07-Jun-16 08:47:14

GPs can point you in the direction of help but organisations like Relate are the best place for couples counselling. I didn't see anyone when I separated just got on with it but didn't need medication. I think seeing the GP is fine if you have a clear idea of what you want them to help with. Going just to offload misery isn't a good idea they aren't trained counsellors and have limited time and only have a normal ability to absorb other people's misery so can get compassion fatigue if a few people in a row go in and start crying

GarlicSteak Tue 07-Jun-16 17:49:01

How did it go, Alittle?

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