AIBU to think that parents should educate there kids about the dangers of unknown dogs.

(57 Posts)
LouiseSmith Fri 28-Feb-14 14:41:54

Sorry folks another dog one.

I'm asking because I had a situation the other day where I was walking my dogs down alley next to a field, and my little dog (Shih Tzu) had lagged behind. I turned and a little girl had hold of her around her tummy, back legs off the floor. Her father (I presume) still on the phone, I asked him to remove the child from my dog, and that she may snap as she doesn't know the child. His response "If it bites her it'll be put down."

Not only that ive lost count of the many times over the years ive been walking and kids having come running at the dogs, not even a "Can i touch the dog?" I mean we spend years telling our kids, "don't talk/go/take sweets off strangers." that we fail to tell them the simplest "don't just walk over to dogs and touch them." Why? The parents would be the first to moan if the dog snapped at the child. But I bet you'd be pretty pee'd off if Mrs X from next door came up to you and started scratching your ears.

WorraLiberty Fri 28-Feb-14 14:47:59

Did you have it on a very long lead?

YANBU, although I would have told the little girl myself to put the dog down.

whatsthatcomingoverthehill Fri 28-Feb-14 14:50:24

Well he sounds like a complete arse, but he's probably right. Yes, parents should teach children not to go up to dogs without asking, but dog owners should also be in control of their animals. Your dog had lagged behind, so you didn't know what it was doing.

WooWooOwl Fri 28-Feb-14 14:52:37

YANBU!

We got this all the time when our dog was a puppy, and it still happens sometimes now that he's older. It's hard to believe that some parents are so stupid.

There was one time not long after the dog had his first jabs when we were in a pub garden, and he was on the lead but asleep on the floor behind me. I didn't even see that there was a toddler of about 18 months old touching the dog until his Dad got my attention and talked to me, so I don't even know how long the dog and the small child had been unsupervised.

I couldn't believe it tbh, this man wouldn't have expected his toddler to behave impeccably 100% of the time, so why was he expecting it from a puppy who was clearly too young to have been fully trained?

LtEveDallas Fri 28-Feb-14 14:52:42

The only answer to the idiot father would be "Maybe so, but your daughter would still be scarred for life - my dogs death wouldn't bring your daughters nose back"

(I've had something similar. I am very sure of the MuttDog, but when I have previous warned a child and their parent NOT to approach until the lead is back on, I'm not going to mince my words when they ignore my warning)

D0oinMeCleanin Fri 28-Feb-14 14:53:35

YANBU, but 3 million and 11 posters are now going to come along and tell you that their child's safety around your dog is your responsibility, which frankly I find barmy.

I like most dog walkers, they're usually very nice people but my child's safety and well being is always my responsibility. End of.

I have a little dog too, I know how frustrating it can be. I've felt like the pied piper at times when I've walked her through parks during the summer holidays.

2cats2many Fri 28-Feb-14 14:54:00

I totally agree with you. My own dog is super friendly and submissive, but we always tell our children to be careful even with her. And I've always taught them to ask dog owners before they pet dogs they don't know. It's basic common sense.

mousmous Fri 28-Feb-14 14:54:57

actually I think ya a bit u

you didn't have your dog in your sight as you should as responsible owner.

mousmous Fri 28-Feb-14 14:55:57

though I do get your point.
I don't allow my dc to touch any animal without permission.

Floralnomad Fri 28-Feb-14 14:56:54

If it was on a lead then YANBU , if it was off lead then YABU because if it bites someone it is your responsibility .

Goldencity1 Fri 28-Feb-14 14:57:24

What a good job your dog is well behaved! Yes, parents should teach their children not to just rush up to strange dogs, you can't tell just by looking if the dog likes children or not. I get this a lot, out walking with 2 golden retrievers, so many people just assume their kids can rush up, grab them, sometimes swinging round their necks. Now my dogs are pretty bomb proof, but the parents don't know that.
On the other hand, if you know you have a dog which doesn't like other people/children, then you should keep it on a lead and consider one of those "give me space" yellow vests.

Goldencity1 Fri 28-Feb-14 14:57:34

What a good job your dog is well behaved! Yes, parents should teach their children not to just rush up to strange dogs, you can't tell just by looking if the dog likes children or not. I get this a lot, out walking with 2 golden retrievers, so many people just assume their kids can rush up, grab them, sometimes swinging round their necks. Now my dogs are pretty bomb proof, but the parents don't know that.
On the other hand, if you know you have a dog which doesn't like other people/children, then you should keep it on a lead and consider one of those "give me space" yellow vests.

Our rules, tell me if they work dog owners, are:

Don't run towards or shout at dogs
Ask the owner, then the dog whether it is OK to pet
If Mummy says no, don't touch

She's three, I think that's enough to be going on with.

Floralnomad Fri 28-Feb-14 14:57:57

Also on a different point ,if it was lagging behind and hence you were not watching it at all times how would you know if it had done a poo that needed picking up ?

WorraLiberty Fri 28-Feb-14 14:58:14

I think the blame is 50-50 here really

The Dad should have been watching his child and the OP should have been watching her dog.

Joysmum Fri 28-Feb-14 14:58:24

Mine is taught to ask the owner first if she can strike.

I became a lot more aware of not treating animals as public property after getting back into horses and realising the amount if them harmed, dead or develop behaviour issues because the public feed them and don't see how 'healthy stuff' can be a problem.

That's a tough Union Joy.

meditrina Fri 28-Feb-14 15:00:04

YADNBU.

I have always trained my DC that they must not approach a dog they do not know without asking the owner first.

And I tell them that if they break that rule, or if they tease a dog, or do not leave it alone if it growls or tries to move away, it will be their own silly fault if they get bitten.

Though I do think owners should, unless extenuating circumstances, be able to see their dog at all times in public, so if an imperfectly trained child does approach, they can intervene quickly.

ItsAllGoingToBeFine Fri 28-Feb-14 15:00:23

I am trying to instill in DD (3) that not all dogs are nice, and she should only approach dogs she knows.

This is somewhat undermined by all of the feckless dog owners who allow their dogs to approach DD (and me).

OP, the father was at fault for not supervising his daughter, but you were also at fault for not supervising your dog.

WorraLiberty Fri 28-Feb-14 15:00:28

MrsTP grin

MothershipG Fri 28-Feb-14 15:03:01

YANBU

As the owner of small dogs I know what you mean, my 2 small dogs are very wary of small children and give them a wide berth!

However - I also think that all dog owners should train their dogs not to run up to children (or anyone else, of course). Before we had dogs ourselves my DC once virtually climbed up me as a Bichon puppy ran over to say hello!

Works both ways, training and consideration required from all parties as usual!

russianfudge Fri 28-Feb-14 15:05:16

I was in our local pub the other day sat next to a couple with a rather large dog who they'd obviously just taken on a walk and stopped for a drink. (Don't know what the dog is, not a doggy person)

Anyway, a man and his (presumably his) child approached, the child was about three or maybe younger. He held the child's hand and encouraged him to walk right up to the dog and pat it's nose. Both of the owners were clearly not very comfortable, the dog looked pretty put out, and even the kid was wary. But the dad, who didn't know the couple or the dog, was insistent that that "there's nothing to be scared of" and continued to pester the dog without even acknowledging the owners! I guess he thought he was doing a good thing by teaching the child not to have irrational fear of dogs. But I thought it very foolish.

Most small children have an inbuilt natural wariness of animals who could potentially hurt them and we don;t want to encourage unecessary worry but I think it's healthy to be aware that animals can and do hurt you.

Velma67 Fri 28-Feb-14 15:05:23

Of course a child shouldn't approach an unknown dog. However, you weren't looking, you have no idea whether the child approached your dog and started playing with it or whether the dog went up to her and started bouncing about, jumping up, licking and wanting to play.

Keep your dog under control.

Whathaveiforgottentoday Fri 28-Feb-14 15:07:31

Yanbu.
Children should be taught to approach unknown dogs with care. That's just common sense. A small children running at a dog can spook them and I hardly thinks its the dogs fault if it snaps out of fear. Children need to be taught to respect animals - the same would apply to other animals too.

Dogs should be under control and children should approach with care and ask permission before stroking.

The child shouldn't have been allowed to pick up the dog. I'm assuming she approached your dog and not the other way around.

LouiseSmith Fri 28-Feb-14 15:08:57

The dog was on a flexi lead, like most dogs who are walked down that stretch. When I say behind she was a couple of steps behind me, stopped to sniff a tree. Between me walking past her and turning back to check her, the child had got hold of her. Because only the back legs of my girl were off the floor it didn't seem to pull on the lead. Luckily my dog just looked a little confused.

I did ask the child to let her go but she simply ignored me, hence why I mentioned it to the father, not my place to tell someone else's child off although I would have removed the child if my dog had of started barking or growling.

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