school trips that are not suitable for children with SN

(130 Posts)
happynewmind Tue 08-Jan-13 21:39:04

I just wondered if this was normal or even allowed.

Every year the dc schools go on a three day trip in term time during school days . Its quite a big deal, they do work building up to it and afterwards, they have photos taken and these are displayed.

I've never taken much notice but last year one of boys who can walk within school and did sports day fine at his own pace but has a wheelchair for longer distance didn't go, he's a confident popular boy so I was a bit suprised but just presumed he didn't fancy it.

However we have got the leaflet home for one of dc turn and it says that any special needs much be discussed and approved before the child is accepted which is fair enough but it then goes on to say that despite this it must be accepted that the centre is not geared up to cater for SN and physical disabilities.

While I think that's the centres choice I have seen centres that do cater for SN and surely the school should look into these rather than exclude a child.

My own dc1 is sen but it not severe and will likely be allowed to go but im now worrying about it.

AndABigBirdInaPearTree Wed 09-Jan-13 18:15:32

but as with so many things relating to SN the parents have to push and push, it's never offered, and schools would rather not bother than to go the extra mile to try to think of a solution.

We have been very lucky for this not to be the case.

DS went on a residential trip with his old school last year. He ended up coming home early because he caused a problem that neither the teacher or I anticipated. His new school does a residential camp later this year too. I spoke to the special needs teacher about the camp and how we needed to put plans in place so he could be successful and that it doesn't happen again and he said they were already on it and had started to figure it all out.

They have been very helpful so far, offering plenty without being asked and if I ask for something they take it seriously. I have friends who have not had this experience so I feel lucky.

tethersend Wed 09-Jan-13 18:31:08

"Two have said they can't take another SEN child, and if she applies they'll appeal..."

Schools are not allowed to do this. Either they have a place or they don't. They don't get to refuse a place on the grounds of SEN. See here.

The borough's SEN panel will decide whether the proposed school can meet the child's needs, and the school will be named on their statement. If the school is full, they can be directed to take a child by the LEA, but this is usually in exceptional circumstances.

13Iggis Wed 09-Jan-13 18:46:08

I have only read one page so far so it has probably already been pointed out that this would be discrimination - assuming reasonable adjustments would enable a wheelchair user to attend (eg different centre with better facilities) then school has to do it.
In fact that very scenario was used on a training session about the equality act which I attended.

Inaflap Wed 09-Jan-13 18:51:34

A school has to make a case if they refuse a child with a statement. They have to prove that they can't meet that child's needs and/or acceptance would be to the detriment of other students health, welfare and education.

I haven't read all of this thread but I think it is a shame that the school isn't choosing a centre which is more inclusive. My son's school included him on everything. However, th OP does not know the full story. It is possible that the boy didn't want to go, or he may have some complex medical needs particularly at night,which could not be met by working teacher supervision. I still think it poor that SEN and disability is rather obviously discriminated against. I think the paraolympics showed us all that many things can be overcome and loads of outdoor centres cater for all sorts of needs now so perhaps the school needs to look elsewhere

mum382013 Wed 09-Jan-13 19:14:36

update got all worked up ready to sort it out. Then she was in too much pain to go in.

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