to think fresh healthy food should be subsidised?

(203 Posts)
kim147 Sun 18-Nov-12 16:50:35

www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/nov/18/breadline-britain-nutritional-recession-austerity

The amount of people getting 5 fruit and veg per day drops by 900,000

"The data show consumption of high-fat and processed foods such as instant noodles, coated chicken, meat balls, tinned pies, baked beans, pizza and fried food has grown among households with an income of less than £25,000 a year, as hard-pressed consumers increasingly choose products perceived to be cheaper and more "filling"."

There's some shocking but not surprising statistics in there about how fruit and veg has gone down. consumption of cheap processed food has gone up - no wonder health outcomes are low for poorer families.

Should certain fresh food be subsidised to ensure people can afford it? Or should people be encouraged to cook more? I think we have a nutritional timebomb.

TalkinPeace2 Sun 18-Nov-12 17:25:28

Unhealthy food should be taxed
Define and define ......
butter is unhealthy, as is sugar - should they have VAT on?
orange juice is healthy but DOES have VAT on ....
salt is unhealthy but essential
too much red meat is unhealthy

AND
all of the politicians are in the pay of the food industry

AnAirOfHopeForSnow Sun 18-Nov-12 17:39:59

I just cant believe the report.

Cooking is a life skill everyone needs. Why are parents not only teaching healthy eating to their kids but how to perpare and cook fresh food?

My three yo ds helped me prepare ginger, garlic peppers and watched me fry salmon fillets today. When i cook he helps or watches. He tries different food each week and i take him shopping with me and i point out the diffetent fruit veg and fish meat.

We are planning on growing our own veg in tubes next year as well.

Because its fun and he will need to know how to cook when he is an adult. Its not hard to do healthy basic cooking!

TalkinPeace2 Sun 18-Nov-12 17:42:34

because many parents have never eaten at a table with a knife and fork in their lives
so how would they show their children how to do something of which they have no knowledge

BertieBotts Sun 18-Nov-12 17:42:54

It is subsidised. Families on low incomes with youung children get Healthy Start vouchers. YABU.

TalkinPeace2 Sun 18-Nov-12 17:47:36

www.healthystart.nhs.uk/healthy-start-vouchers/do-i-qualify/
Family income of £16,000 or less ....
www.healthystart.nhs.uk/healthy-start-vouchers/what-to-buy-with-the-vouchers/
Only some shops accept the vouchers and they are to the grand sum total of £3.10

you who have kitchens to cook in seem to think that a pittance of a handout will make it all better.

Sirzy Sun 18-Nov-12 17:50:34

Sadly true Bertie. Of course the education SHOULD come from parents but that only works if they have been taught themselves.

There is help avaiable to parents in most areas but that is only any good I parents take the help on offer. That is why it needs to be done in schools from a young age so the next generation all have these skills

AnAirOfHopeForSnow Sun 18-Nov-12 17:50:52

We dont have a table but we do have a kitchen, pots, pans and a cooker smile

Bonsoir Sun 18-Nov-12 17:53:10

Seasonal, locally (or even nationally) grown vegetables are cheap and nutritious - carrots, swedes, turnips, parsnips, cabbage, onions, leeks etc are all grown in the UK and can be cooked in many delicious ways. Pulses are are also cheap and nutritious.

AnAirOfHopeForSnow Sun 18-Nov-12 17:54:51

Talking - there are free cooking classes at the sure start centres. As a parent i think its my job to learn these things mxself so i can teach my children.

Most things im learning when im doing them with my children. It benefits the whole family but you need the motavation to want to learn.

Mandy2003 Sun 18-Nov-12 17:55:39

I used to buy several packs of different fruit per week, but this year even when it was in season I just would not pay £2 for a few strawberries, raspberries or grapes. Luckily apples and bananas are still £1 per pack but strawberries are now £2.25. That's as much as I spend on fresh meat in a week!

stargirl1701 Sun 18-Nov-12 17:55:52

Unhealthy food as in highly processed food.

mrskeithrichards Sun 18-Nov-12 17:56:29

I think frozen and tinned alternatives aren't well promoted. Often a lot cheaper, quicker and easier.

Sirzy Sun 18-Nov-12 17:57:07

Sorry meant talkingpeace not Bertie!

AnAirOfHopeForSnow Sun 18-Nov-12 17:59:11

What are pulses please? blush

mrskeithrichards Sun 18-Nov-12 18:01:10

Lentils and shit I assume!

Mandy2003 Sun 18-Nov-12 18:01:12

Lentils, dried peas and beans, that sort of thing Air

Talkingpeace you get £3.10 per 2-5 yr old and 6.20 for under 1yr olds. Also 3.10 if your pregnant. It's not a fortune, but I have to say, it's really helped us out.

StuntGirl Sun 18-Nov-12 18:01:43

Nope I'm well aware different governments have different amounts depending in what they thought the people would go in for. Japan and Sweden have much higher 'targets' for example.

Laughing at people trying to eat healthily makes you come across as a tool. Who cares what other people eat?

mrskeithrichards Sun 18-Nov-12 18:03:06

Mandy I agree. Grapes are always the most expensive thing on my receipts. I do buy quite a lot because it's the only fruit dh readily eats, apart from strawberries and watermelon, and ds loves them too.

AnAirOfHopeForSnow Sun 18-Nov-12 18:05:53

Thanks blush

TalkinPeace2 Sun 18-Nov-12 18:08:04

IBlame
but the fact that you are even on this thread shows that you care.
How many of the mums at the sure start do?

Seriously, I see kids whose parents are third generation unemployed with iphones, blackberries and talking about watching sky at home - priorities are all wrong

I audited a youth club that did a weekly "cook and eat" session.
Many of the 15 years olds admitted that that they only ate at a table with cutlery that once a week. SCARY. They did not know how to use a knife to cut up meat. at 15

Wallison Sun 18-Nov-12 18:10:10

Haven't tinned vegetables had the fuck boiled out of them before they get canned? As for frozen, yes to peas and sweetcorn - and spinach if you don't want it just 'wilted'. Broad beans are fine too. But frozen broccoli and cauliflower are pretty rank and frozen carrots just don't taste the same ime.

I think it is a problem that the very cheapest food is not always the most nutritious. For example if you're thinking about puddings it is cheaper to buy a massive box of nasty ice-cream than it is to buy a small pot of yoghurt. For snacks, a punnet of grapes is significantly more expensive than a bag of haribo. It costs more to buy nice meat and make a pie than it does to get a pack of four horrible pies full of salt and arseholes. Etc.

mrskeithrichards Sun 18-Nov-12 18:10:42

Sometimes people have so much other stuff going on in their lives, so many other pressures and stresses, that even classes at surestart can't convince them to spent time over meals

AnAirOfHopeForSnow Sun 18-Nov-12 18:12:32

I like Asda because the have five fruit bags for £1, bunch of Bananas and apples for £1. Then a bag of raisens for £1.

I work it as one glass of oj or smoothy
one banana
one box of raisens
then 3 different veg with dinner
equals our 5aday.

mrskeithrichards Sun 18-Nov-12 18:14:26

Oh I like the sound of the 5 bags for £1 is that the wee sliced apples and grapes like you get with a happy meal?

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