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NOW CLOSED: DDs and periods: share your thoughts, experiences with Lil-Lets – you could win a £200 John Lewis voucher

(114 Posts)
AnnMumsnet (MNHQ) Mon 19-Nov-12 14:21:17

Hello - we've been asked by the team at Lil-Lets to find out from mothers (and fathers) how they approach conversations about periods with their daughters - or if your DD is a bit young - how you think you'd introduce the topic with them and how you'd help her prepare and advise on what protection to use.

Here are some questions as a starting point;

~What sort of approach works best? Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD?
~ How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you?
~ What do you think is of interest or concern to your daughter at this time?
~ What about protection? How do you and your DD decide which option to go for - does this change as they get more used to having their period or get older?
~ If your DD suffers with menstrual cramps how do you manage this? Are there any practical things you can do to help your DD if you suspect she is about to start having her periods?
~ Finally, mood swings are commonplace during puberty to you have any tips or concerns you can share? - (or should we not even go there?!)
~ What tips or advice would you share with other parents about puberty and periods?

Lil-Lets say "We are proud to be the only sanitary brand in the UK to offer products designed specifically for teens. With their younger and smaller bodies in mind, the range of towels and liners are shorter and narrower than the adult range to provide the perfect fit. To make things even easier, we have brought all of this together in a 'Teen Starter Pack' which includes 2 lite tampons, 1 regular tampon, 2 regular applicator tampons, 1 teens liner pouch, 4 day teens towels, 2 night teens towels and 1 becoming a teens booklet for advice on puberty and using the products"

Have a look at it by clicking here - and let them know what you think

Share your thoughts, experiences and stories on this thread and you'll be entered into a prize draw where one winner will get a £200 John Lewis voucher - 5 runners up will also get a teen starter pack (worth £3.99).

For more information and advice on talking to your daughter about periods visit the parents section of the Lil-Lets website

Thanks
MNHQ

Hopezibah Tue 20-Nov-12 15:23:19

My DD a bit young at the mo - but I remember this being a difficult topic to discuss with my parents so here are my opinions anyway:

~What sort of approach works best? Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD?

Parents should start the conversation.

~ How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you?
I used to feel really embarassed about talking with my mum. I hope my daughter will be able to talk a lot more easily with me about it.

~ What do you think is of interest or concern to your daughter at this time?
n/a - too young.
~ What about protection? How do you and your DD decide which option to go for - does this change as they get more used to having their period or get older?

I would prefer to start on sanitary towels / pads until she feels ready to try tampons.

~ If your DD suffers with menstrual cramps how do you manage this? Are there any practical things you can do to help your DD if you suspect she is about to start having her periods?

I used to suffer a LOT with period pains / cramps etc. Painkillers to help with pain. I really hope my daughter doesn't suffer anywhere near as much as i did. My only solution in the end was going on pill to reduce pain.

~ Finally, mood swings are commonplace during puberty to you have any tips or concerns you can share? - (or should we not even go there?!)
Just be really understanding - theres a reason for all that grumpiness.

~ What tips or advice would you share with other parents about puberty and periods?

I remember having a great book that helped. I think having books aimed at girls that openly talk about periods and other issues that affect girls is a great addition to talking with parents.

missymoomoomee Tue 20-Nov-12 16:12:56

~What sort of approach works best? Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD?

I did with my oldest DD, I started my periods when I was 9 and didn't know what was going on so from the age of about 4 or 5 she has been aware of the very basics, I will do this with my younger DDs as well.

~ How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you?

She hasn't started but she is really open about any aspect of puberty and coming to me with it, I haven't made a big deal about periods so she doesn't feel like its a big deal to talk about.

~ What do you think is of interest or concern to your daughter at this time?

She is worried about starting her periods, although I have provided the information its still going to be an unknown feeling.

~ What about protection? How do you and your DD decide which option to go for - does this change as they get more used to having their period or get older?

I will buy lots of varieties when DD is old enough so she has the choice and is comfortable with it.

~ If your DD suffers with menstrual cramps how do you manage this? Are there any practical things you can do to help your DD if you suspect she is about to start having her periods?

She is too young yet but I will be buying a hot water bottle for her and I will look into some herbal remedies too.

~ Finally, mood swings are commonplace during puberty to you have any tips or concerns you can share? - (or should we not even go there?!)

I have explained to her about the grumpiness but I guess we can only deal with it when she gets there (I am perfectly rational and like a little ray of sunshine when I'm on mine so I hope she takes after me grin )

~ What tips or advice would you share with other parents about puberty and periods?

Not to make a big deal about it and have the 'big' talk. I think its much better to let children know from a young age about the changes that will happen in their bodies and then it doesn't seem such a scary prospect.

DD is only just approaching 3 so this is a while off yet!

What sort of approach works best? Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD?

I think I'll just raise the subject normally. She has already been in the bathroom when I'm changing my moon cup so she will have some idea about mechanics, if not the intricacies.

How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you?

I'll be honest and say I think I will feel awkward but it's one of those jobs that just has to be done.

What do you think is of interest or concern to your daughter at this time?

I expect her concerns will be similar to mine and thousands of other women. Will it leak, will anyone know, etc.

What about protection? How do you and your DD decide which option to go for - does this change as they get more used to having their period or get older?

I wish I'd heard of mooncups when I was a teenager, though I appreciate some may find it fiddly to start with. I will give her all the options and let her choose for herself. I don't want to be like my mum, who never thought to buy me tampons because she'd had problems as a teen and thought you had to be a non-virgin to use them.

If your DD suffers with menstrual cramps how do you manage this? Are there any practical things you can do to help your DD if you suspect she is about to start having her periods?

Hot water bottles, paracetomol, tea, sympathy for an hour or two, followed by a robust and stoical attitude.

Finally, mood swings are commonplace during puberty to you have any tips or concerns you can share? - (or should we not even go there?!)

I suffered from horrendous moodswings, and nothing changed them. Even now in my 40s I still get them. I think that acknowledging that you are likely to be tetchy a week before, and being aware that your behaviour may need to be modified/rationalised to yourself are important.

What tips or advice would you share with other parents about puberty and periods?

I'm going to try very hard to remember what it was like when I was in puberty, try and avoid the mistakes my mum made, and remember the bits that were good.

~What sort of approach works best? Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD?
For us it was my DD who approached the subject. I have always talked openly with her and answered her questions and provided her with as much information as possible - fortunately she loves reading so this is a great way to get information across. Also she was in a year5/year 6 class at primary school so had the "period talk" a year early which raised lots of questions.

~ How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you?
She seems to feel very comfortable and asks about anything she wants to know.

~ What do you think is of interest or concern to your daughter at this time?
What it will be like when she starts and what pads and tampons look like.

~ What about protection? How do you and your DD decide which option to go for - does this change as they get more used to having their period or get older?
I haven't discussed it with her, just presume she will use pads first as I think at this age she is too young for tampons. I think when she is older and more experienced and feels comfortable with her body, then will be a good time to discuss tampons.

~ If your DD suffers with menstrual cramps how do you manage this? Are there any practical things you can do to help your DD if you suspect she is about to start having her periods?
My DD hasn't started yet but I will provide her with a heated wheatpad as this is what I use to help with the cramps. If they are really bad I will give her some painkillers if necessary. I think the best way to help her if I suspect she is going to start is just to be honest and answer all her questions without making a big deal out of it.

~ Finally, mood swings are commonplace during puberty to you have any tips or concerns you can share? - (or should we not even go there?!)
Pick your fights! - some things are too little to fall out over or make a big deal about, just save that for the bigger issues!

~ What tips or advice would you share with other parents about puberty and periods?
Try and keep calm and keep them informed about what is happening. If it is possible to talk about periods etc from when they are little, then it won't suddenly be a big surprise - some of DDs friends knew nothing before the talk at school and were very shocked!

Elainey1609 Tue 20-Nov-12 17:13:53

Ummmm to think when i was introduced to the subject started when both mum and dad discussed with me when mum was having one so i knew that men and women were different.
But the main discussion was after i had my first talk about it all in primary school...they didnt do a very good job of explaining it at all....so mum mum sat me down and was completly straight with me

I think parents see signs of impeding puberty and can become aware of when the discussion should take place

Make sure its explained that its normal, not embasrrsing and encourage discussion.

Also even though you may use tampons ect make sure there are some towels avalible for when the children start

Enable them to use the product which is most comfortable, taht isnt always the same as you

If moods swings happen let them cry or shout,,,its better than bottling it all up which can make them ill

CanonFodder Tue 20-Nov-12 17:40:32

~What sort of approach works best? Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD? DD asked me about my tampons when she was about 5, I gave her a very brief version, but have since explained a bit more about the details of what happens, shown her diagrams of what her body looks like inside and whenever I discuss anything I've done before kids that sounds fun she says 'I was there, as an egg!'.

How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you? She's only 7, but already seems very interested, asks a lot of questions, we had to put a tampon in water so she could see how one works etc.

The other questions don't apply at the moment, but I will continue to tell her about them as and when she asks and when she gets to 9 or so I think we'll get her her own little pack to have in the bathroom for when the time comes. As with all the big topics (drink, drugs, boys) I'll share relevant experiences and be as honest as I can. I'd rather she hear the truth from me than the usual school horror stories.

quail Tue 20-Nov-12 18:01:32

My dds are 4 and 6.

~What sort of approach works best? Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD?

I've been very matter of fact to begin with, I think very small girls should begin with the technicalities but none of the downsides. So when they asked me why I was using tampax I told them about periods, what is going on in the body etc, and explained that it was blood but it doesn't hurt and I'm not ill. (It does hurt, though. Cramping today.)

~ How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you?

At this age they're curious, for about 5 minutes. They have no notion of this happening to them even though I told them it happens to all women.

~ What do you think is of interest or concern to your daughter at this time?

Why their mum is having a period.

~ What about protection? How do you and your DD decide which option to go for - does this change as they get more used to having their period or get older?

I'm basically going to tell them what to do. I think this isn't something you want to figure out for yourself. The way I do it may not ultimately be the way they do it, but when they're little, I think you just want to be told, here's what happens, here's what you'll do, don't worry.

~ If your DD suffers with menstrual cramps how do you manage this? Are there any practical things you can do to help your DD if you suspect she is about to start having her periods?

Depends, I guess. I have no problem with child nurofen now, so even though the thought of medicating my teenagers makes me panic, I wouldn't rule out a couple of painkillers if the pain is as bad as mine was in my late teens. If I suspect my dds are about to start, I suppose I'll talk to them about it a lot. I'm sure their friends will be.

~ Finally, mood swings are commonplace during puberty to you have any tips or concerns you can share? - (or should we not even go there?!)

I am noticeably a bit weepier and sometimes a bit angrier pre-menstrually, but I didn't notice it when I was a teenager (because I was always weepy and angry) and I don't think this is something they need to watch out for. I'm guessing that if they get a bit weepy in an observable pattern I would point out the possible hormonal link. I don't really find talking about any of this stuff awkward, I don't think many women do any more.

~ What tips or advice would you share with other parents about puberty and periods?

My kids are too young for me to have any advice for anyone else.

quail Tue 20-Nov-12 18:04:16

Oh, also, please could I ask not to be sent the teen starter pack. There'll be people who it's going to be much more useful for, I'm not likely to keep it for 6 years.

John Lewis voucher, on the other hand, that will be okay.

44SoStartingOver Tue 20-Nov-12 18:06:48

What sort of approach works best? Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD?

My dds have known about periods forever. They cheerfully accompanied me to the loo, so no secrets there. No mystery, no panic

~ How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you?
Very upfront. One very awkward in front to her dad. The other thinks hse is extremely clever for having periods!

~ What do you think is of interest or concern to your daughter at this time?
For one dd it was catching up with her friends who started earlier. For the other, it was starting ahead of her friends whilst still at primary school.

~ What about protection? How do you and your DD decide which option to go for - does this change as they get more used to having their period or get older? No really discussed, I bought small teen pads to suit.

~ If your DD suffers with menstrual cramps how do you manage this? Are there any practical things you can do to help your DD if you suspect she is about to start having her periods?

One dd has calpol, the other takes nurofen.

~ Finally, mood swings are commonplace during puberty to you have any tips or concerns you can share? - (or should we not even go there?!)
One dd is quite unmoody, the other (younger) has such dramatic mood swings she does not know what to do with herself.

~ What tips or advice would you share with other parents about puberty and periods?

Familiary with pads and how they fit into knickers is good. Prepare a little toilet bag with nappy sacks and spare knickers well in advance, so if it happens at school or brownie camp she feels prepared and not panicked.

CheeryCherry Tue 20-Nov-12 18:19:37

I spoke to both my DDs before they went on Y5 residentials as I worried they would panic if something happened while they were away. So they have carried a little toilet bag in their school bag since they were 10 with a pair of pants, and a couple of panty liners. I also made it clear they could dispose of any really badly soiled pants as I didn't want them stressing over that.
I think my DDs have been happy to discuss things with me, and they are both very organised so forward thinking pays off.
My eldest DD does not want to try tampons yet though I do occasionally encourage her to try. Her choice. She suffers from aches and pains on her first couple of days, which shocked her at first as she has a very high pain threshold, but a hot bath, hot water bottle and an early night tends to help. She never wants painkillers.
I quite like the idea of the teen pack....but not the name! My eldest was 11 when she started as was I. I know she is growing up fast but at 11 is not yet a teen...I'm not wishing her life away!

hermancakedestroyer Tue 20-Nov-12 19:18:55

~What sort of approach works best? Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD?
My dd is 10 and I am waiting for her to bring up the subject. I often say to her if there is anything you need to know please ask and keep the lines of communication open.

~ How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you?
She hasnt discussed them yet but I will be there to listen when she does.

~ What do you think is of interest or concern to your daughter at this time?
Body changes, breasts developing, hair growing in irregular places, sweating

~ What about protection? How do you and your DD decide which option to go for - does this change as they get more used to having their period or get older?
I will discuss all options when the time arises.

~ If your DD suffers with menstrual cramps how do you manage this? Are there any practical things you can do to help your DD if you suspect she is about to start having her periods?
I do not hide any tampons or towels in my house. They are in the toilet to be discussed where necessary.

~ Finally, mood swings are commonplace during puberty to you have any tips or concerns you can share? - (or should we not even go there?!)
My friend said to me 'choose your battles' and that is good advice. If you find your DD getting ratty or irate then be the adult and try to speak calmly and rationally to them. Give them space and always be there to listen.

~ What tips or advice would you share with other parents about puberty and periods?
Be open and honest and answer questions as they arise.

Snog Tue 20-Nov-12 19:21:32

Re mood swings, I think it helps t

Snog Tue 20-Nov-12 19:27:25

Re mood swings, I think it helps to empathise with how difficult this is for your dd more than how difficult it is for the parents! And to explain how hormones affect mood, and to recognise when your child's behaviour is hormonally driven!
I recommend evening primrose oil, good diet, exercise, early night, hot bath, good cry and a cuddle with dad. And a lot of understanding and love.
Re periods, I give my dd info and choices and am very open about my own experiences.

QOD Tue 20-Nov-12 19:27:53

I just wish I had a boy!

Vivalebeaver Tue 20-Nov-12 19:30:17

~What sort of approach works best? Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD?

I think that been factual about it is the best approach, it's no different to discussing teeth, etc. I approached dd to discuss it in detail when she was about 9yo. But she's always been aware that women get periods, since a toddler.

~ How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you? Fine, no problem at all. I've told she can always come and ask me anything.

~ What do you think is of interest or concern to your daughter at this time? Dd is 11, she's desperate to get boobs and oddly enough she's desperate to start her periods. I think she perceives it as been grown up and sadly she seems in a hurry to grow up.

~ What about protection? How do you and your DD decide which option to go for - does this change as they get more used to having their period or get older?

I have some sanitary towels in the house and one in dds school bag. These were free teenage ones I got in the post from Lilets a while ago. I would imagine once she's a little older she might want to start using tampons.

~ If your DD suffers with menstrual cramps how do you manage this? Are there any practical things you can do to help your DD if you suspect she is about to start having her periods? Dd already gets bad cramps and is prescribed buscopan. Hot water bottles and paracetamol help as well.

~ Finally, mood swings are commonplace during puberty to you have any tips or concerns you can share? - (or should we not even go there?!)

I ignore most of the mood swings as much as I feel I can. Yes she can be vile at times but it won't last forever. If I pull her up on it at the time she goes crazy and it turns into ww3. I'd rather walk away, calmly telling her that I won't discuss things while she's been like she is. Then have a chat when she's calmed down and remind her about trying to be nice, not lose it, etc.

~ What tips or advice would you share with other parents about puberty.

Ask on mumsnet for advice if its all going a bit pear shaped!

HazeltheMcWitch Tue 20-Nov-12 20:09:44

My DC are too young to be nearing puberty, so I have not had to go into specifics, but I am keen to normalise periods. As 'it' was something that was not at all discussed for me; I really had to figure it all out from magazines! And I never really lost the whole idea of periods being shameful and havign to be hidden away.
So the thing I can do now is NOT hide it away: they know what periods are, I openly buy/store tampons etc, and they know that I sometimes have period pains. I hope that this will also lead to being able to discuss it openly, ask questions, although of course as time goes on, I will need to have more specific conversations. Not sure exactly how yet, but will probably browse on MN for inspiration!

Arcticwaffle Tue 20-Nov-12 20:09:53

~What sort of approach works best? Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD?

We're pretty open about bodily functions in this house and I have 3 dds (12, 11, 8). Periods are something we've always discussed, from when they were little and showing interest in my mooncup. Since then they talk about it on occasion. None started yet.

~ How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you?

They are generally interested and ask questions.

~ What do you think is of interest or concern to your daughter at this time?

What they're most interested in is how much liquid a tampon can hold. On occasion we get one and fill a bowl with water and red food colouring and they watch the tampon soak it all up. They love this! They also like to hear stories of my mooncup flipping blood across the service station loo, etc.

~ What about protection? How do you and your DD decide which option to go for - does this change as they get more used to having their period or get older?

I have packs for when they start, with cute little tins to keep the towels in. When they do start we'll see how they go with those.

~ If your DD suffers with menstrual cramps how do you manage this? Are there any practical things you can do to help your DD if you suspect she is about to start having her periods?

I'll be recommending nurofen etc.

~ Finally, mood swings are commonplace during puberty to you have any tips or concerns you can share? - (or should we not even go there?!)

my dds don't seem to be in that mood swing time yet, I'm still the biggest drama queen with pmt in the house.

~ What tips or advice would you share with other parents about puberty and periods?

Not sure, as we don't get embarrassed easily about this stuff so it's hard to give advice to people who don't find it easy to talk about personal things. but we have a good book "What's happening to me?" which was full of information for 8 year olds up. the dds really liked that.

GetKnitted Tue 20-Nov-12 21:52:01

Although, clearly it is the conversations with DDs around periods that you're interested in, what with them buying Lil-lets and all, with two boys I want to make sure that from a relatively early age they are appropriately educated about everything biological. I'd rather have lots of small conversations rather than one big one!

Elfontheshelfiswatchingyou Tue 20-Nov-12 21:55:24

Tried to initiate this topic with DD2 earlier. She covered her ears and went "lalala" so maybe she's not ready yet. Where did DD1 leave that book...?
smile

cornishblue Tue 20-Nov-12 21:59:15

I have 2 girls, 15 & 13, and both have started their periods - at 13 and 12 respectively. I think they might have asked about them first when they were little (finding my tampons and asking what they were for, something like that) and after that the details came up gradually. I bought them a book too, which sparked other conversations. Both are very relaxed about about discussing periods now.

They are both concerned about frequency and heaviness. DD1 has a particularly hard time with heavy periods and a short cycle, and DD2 is concerned with hers being unpredictable.

Both use towels for now, but they have tampons of different sizes to try if and when they are ready. DD1 has asked about their suitability for her heavy periods - she is nervous of leakage - but is interested in trying. DD2 has only had 3 periods and isn't keen on the idea of tampons at the moment.

They both get cramps and take paracetamol (they have some in their school bags too). Also they like hot water bottles if they are bad in the evening. Before their periods started I tried to make sure both girls had emergency knickers & STs in their school bags from age 12 or so. Of course neither had anything on them when the day came. But they are fully equipped at all times now

Once puberty starts, it's surprisingly quick, so be ready. Have all the kit, the patience and the answers ready to go...

As for mood swings/general teenage histronics, it's a huge topic, shall we write a book?

~What sort of approach works best? Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD?
I think it should all be very casual, normalising this is of major imprtance.
~ How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you?
Absolutely fine - very easy and casual.
~ What do you think is of interest or concern to your daughter at this time?
She finds towels uncomfortable - but I feel she's not ready for tampons, but I'm not sure why.
~ If your DD suffers with menstrual cramps how do you manage this? Are there any practical things you can do to help your DD if you suspect she is about to start having her periods?
She doesn;t seem to have suffered pain yet.
~ Finally, mood swings are commonplace during puberty to you have any tips or concerns you can share? - (or should we not even go there?!)
I have told her that the rage and irrational irritability is inevitable, and learning to deal with it is an ongoing skill. I have suggesting that removing oneslef from other human company is often the best option. Ahem.
~ What tips or advice would you share with other parents about puberty and periods?
To normalise the whole thing - nothing is dirty or disgusting about it, unlike how it was addressed to me. sad

Theas18 Tue 20-Nov-12 22:19:07

Have a 19 yr I'd and a 13yr old and matter of fact normal part of life type conversations have been had from very young. Don't ever recall a big chat. Bought a few books for them too ( especially as we thought dd2 might start very early) .

"keep calm and carry on" is our sort of mantra. The youngest probably has cyclical mode sings but she's moody anyway do is hard to tell!

Re cramps , periods on holiday and all that my attitude is medicate to the hilt, no reason to suffer , and no reason to allow a period to blight a pool/beach based holiday (yup tampons work fine but if your beach has no toilets it's a pain).

The funniest thing was a really sweet family happenstance when dd2 had her 1st period when the kids were on a course. Got a text from my son (then 13) to say the 11yr old had started her periods but it was fine because the 15yr od had sorted her out.

My only issue, and I'm sure Liletts don't want to know , is that the teen towels etc are awfully expensive for girls that probably change a lot more than they need to - limited loo access at school, fear of leaks etc . Mine use own brand ultra thins, and a lot of them lol.

nothingtodotoday Tue 20-Nov-12 22:20:26

What sort of approach works best? Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD?

This subject is best talked about from an early age so the child is prepared and not shocked by the onset of periods. My DD saw lil lets and sanitary towels in the bathroom and were well aware of what they were for prior to needing them.

~ How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you?

She has always had no difficulty discussing them for tha above reasons.

~ What do you think is of interest or concern to your daughter at this time?

She has no worries and was always prepared incase they started,sg took sanitary towels on a school trip "just in case"

~ What about protection? How do you and your DD decide which option to go for - does this change as they get more used to having their period or get older?

We agreed to start with sanitary towels then as she was a competitive swimmer used lil lets for swimming sessins from her second period onwards.

~ If your DD suffers with menstrual cramps how do you manage this? Are there any practical things you can do to help your DD if you suspect she is about to start having her periods?

Luckily, none really suffered

~ Finally, mood swings are commonplace during puberty to you have any tips or concerns you can share? - (or should we not even go there?!)

Let them have their "moment", then remind them it is mood swings and hope they calm down!

~ What tips or advice would you share with other parents about puberty and periods?

Be open ad talk about things!!!

maxpower Tue 20-Nov-12 22:26:51

~What sort of approach works best?
Honesty

Who do you think should start the conversation off?you or your DD?
Depends. DD is only 6 but if she asked me I'd give her an honest answer appropriate to her age. If she hasn't brought up the subject by the time she's about 9/10, I'll tell her.

~ How does your DD feel about discussing periods with you?
I would hope she'd feel able to talk to me, although from personal experience she's bound to feel a bit embarrassed as she gets older.

~ What do you think is of interest or concern to your daughter at this time?
I would imagine that to start with, she'd want to know that it's perfectly normal and nothing to worry about. If it will hurt.

~ What about protection? How do you and your DD decide which option to go for - does this change as they get more used to having their period or get older?
I'd let her know about options (probably only towels or tampons rather than mooncups) and explain the pros and cons to them. Give her some of both to let her try out. I would however explain that one towel will last all night - I remember that being a real worry first time round!

~ If your DD suffers with menstrual cramps how do you manage this? Are there any practical things you can do to help your DD if you suspect she is about to start having her periods?
DD's not old enough yet. As for practical things, I'd make sure she had a supply of protection.

~ Finally, mood swings are commonplace during puberty to you have any tips or concerns you can share? - (or should we not even go there?!)
(Pretending this won't affect by DD hmm

~ What tips or advice would you share with other parents about puberty and periods?
Not there yet so difficult to speak from experience.

sausagerolemodel Tue 20-Nov-12 22:38:56

I've always felt I wanted to be honest and also for it to be very normal and matter of fact. My DD is 4 but after a couple of times in the bathroom going through contortions to try and hide what I was doing, I decided just to act normally about it. She saw some blood, asked what it was, and I explained (in an age appropriate way) that it happened once a month unless I was going to have a baby and it happens to all big girls and grown up women. That was as much as she needed/wanted to know. From time to time she asks another question about it "did it hurt" - "no". I just give her answers as and when she asks. She knows the tampon is like a plug to protect my clothes from the blood. She knows the blood is like a nest for a baby. The rest will follow. I've always felt that I'd rather she grows up knowing than the idea of sitting down for "a chat". I still remember how embarrassed/shocked and unable to ask questions I felt aged 9/10 when my Mum told me, even though she did it in a very normal down to earth way. It felt like it came out of nowhere.

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