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Dr Michael Mosley and Peta Bee: Live webchat - Monday 13 January, midday - 1pm.

(78 Posts)
RachelMumsnet (MNHQ) Fri 10-Jan-14 14:12:09

Dr Michael Mosley and co-author of Fast Exercise, Peta Bee are joining us on Monday 13 January to talk us through the practice and benefits of high intensity training.

In their book Fast Exercise, Dr Michael Mosley, a reluctant exerciser, and super-fit health journalist Peta Bee show how to safely do High Intensity Training and get the benefits – whatever your fitness level. Drawing on cutting edge research they show why high intensity training can be more effective than much longer periods of low-impact exercise. They also offer a range of workouts, of varying intensity – there is something here for everyone. As this fascinating book demonstrates, when it comes to exercise, less can be more.

Join the webchat on Monday at midday or post a question in advance to this thread.

Oblomov Fri 10-Jan-14 17:09:03

Is there a tv programme? I prefer watching things like this on a tv programme?

Redbushytea Fri 10-Jan-14 17:57:52

How can I overcome my reluctance to do short bursts of intense exercise? For example, on an exercise bike or rowing machine in the gym, it's much more pleasant just to keep plugging away at an easy speed. I know I need to up the pace for short bursts. But I don't want to.

blush grin

TheLeastAccomplishedBennetGirl Fri 10-Jan-14 18:35:01

you have changed my life, Dr Mosley

thank you thanks

<suck ass emoticon but i mean it>

risingsunshine Sat 11-Jan-14 16:23:00

Same question as Bushy! smile

DrNick Sat 11-Jan-14 16:29:38

oh GOD folks just eat everyday but eat less.

this freaky semi starvation shit

DrNick Sat 11-Jan-14 16:30:06

oh tis EXERCISE now
sheesh

Doyouthinktheysaurus Sat 11-Jan-14 17:05:14

So I'm a runner, normally do 30 miles a week. I have recently started speed work, so faster running for shorter periods, normally a mile or half a mile faster than steady pace with a short recovery.

My question is how would high intensity training fit in with an endurance running programme for someone like me, whose exercise regime consists solely of running?

Please don't suggest the gym because I don't belong to one and don't intend to change that.....

Jcee Sat 11-Jan-14 18:31:43

Its taken me an age to get to the point where I exercise regularly and dont fob myself off with excuses not to go. I like to swim and have been working on technique over the last 6 months, so now I'm swimming much better and have almost got my breathing and strokes in sync, next steps are to build my endurance.

I'm wondering whether I just try fast exercise instead of slogging away at increasing lengths over the next few months and if so, how can I do it with swimming?

hopefulgum Sun 12-Jan-14 04:09:35

I am also reluctant to do short,hard bursts. I am not sure why, because I do believe it will be better for me. I have gotten a nice routine of swimming laps at a reasonable pace (I am breathless and heart rate is up) for 30 minutes at a time. I also enjoy long walks at a moderate pace. Both of which I enjoy immensely.Convince me that HIIT is worth doing.

Also, does HIIT apply to strength training? If so, how?

Slubberdegullion Sun 12-Jan-14 09:10:45

Hi Michael,
I remember watching your programme last year (? was it last year) on this subject, and very interesting it was too. Thank God I thought after watching it, I really don't ever have to join a gym ever again. Revolting moist, sweaty spandex places <shudder>

So my question is similar to hopefulchums. I remember from the programme that having a really high step count per day was also seen as a perfectly good and valid way to help with maintaining a good weight, although I can't remember if it helps cardiovascular 'health', in terms of adding lots of years back to your life.

Because of my job and my dog I walk a gazzilion steps everyday. It's really quite impressive let me tell you, my step count wink. Do I really, really need to add HIIT to my daily routine too? What added health benefits will I get?

PulpsNotFiction Sun 12-Jan-14 11:19:05

Will HIT improve muscle tone? Or just general fitness levels?
I've been on 5:2 for a year now and have lost two stone, I'm now maintaining on 6:1 but I've never exercised. I don't enjoy it, so this may suit me!

Do I need equipment in order to do it?

Just seen you on Sunday brunch, erm it certainly looks 'intense' grin

radiatormesh Sun 12-Jan-14 14:40:43

Part of the goal of an exercise program is often to burn calories. Other than by boosting muscle mass (and therefore metabolism), how does HIT do this? However hard you work, you simply won't burn enough calories in a short session to make any difference to weight loss.

In addition, HIT is high intensity. The American College of Exercise claims that drop-out rates from vigorous intensity exercise are twice as high as from moderate intensity programs: isn't it better to encourage people to do something of a more moderate intensity to which they are which they are more likely to commit long-term?

TheSporkforeatingkyriarchy Sun 12-Jan-14 15:38:59

I can see the appeal and I remember discussing it at the time the Horizon programme came on. I see the evidence, but I wonder if promoting this fast attitude towards exercise is a good thing. The attitude around this is that this is all the one needs to do physically to improve health, when most current research shows that while people may not need more exercise, they do need to move a lot more and that if all you do in this and spend 95%+ percent of your time sitting around in the same patterns, then really on paper it won't be doing much good. The current attitude around exercise is already a problem and the promotion around this kind of exercise, rather than actual HIT, seems to feed into that which will not give the results that it surely aiming for - a healthier population.

Cat98 Sun 12-Jan-14 22:19:41

My husband and I do the 5:2 WOE and love it.
My q is around the health benefits - I read somewhere that it may increase the risk of diabetes in women of normal weight. I know this study had a v small sample but I wondered what your thoughts are on this? Do you know if there are plans for any more research into this and health benefits?
Thank you.

amimagic Sun 12-Jan-14 23:33:59

This sounds really interesting to me. I've never got time to do any meaningful exercise (or inclination to make time!) and I'm pretty much totally sedentary.

I've lost nearly 2 stone on the 5:2 (thank you Michael!!) so am quite happy to give this a go too.

My question is, I'm sure i read or saw that this form of exercising doesn't work for everyone, and that Michael was one of the ones it didn't work for. Have I made this up? How can a few minutes give any real benefits, and is it dangerous?

MoleInAComa Mon 13-Jan-14 04:17:39

All interesting stuff! I am a 40 something living very rurally and with bad knees! Could I do very fast walking as I love being outside and there is no cost involved! Would it have the same benefits?

TheRaniOfYawn Mon 13-Jan-14 10:47:24

I am also after suggestions for something which is low impact (plantar fasciitis) but doesn't require joining a gun or getting equipment that takes up lots of space. Would fast intense sets of bodyweight exercises count?

RachelMumsnet (MNHQ) Mon 13-Jan-14 11:59:16

Michael and Peta are in the office and about to start answering your questions over the next hour.

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:00:47

Hello everyone, we are here and ready to answer your questions on Fast Exercise!

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:01:12

Hi everyone, Peta Bee (my co-author on Fast Exercise) and I are here. Peta knows all about exercise, I know more about the medical stuff, but happy to answer anything

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:03:03

TheRaniOfYawn

I am also after suggestions for something which is low impact (plantar fasciitis) but doesn't require joining a gun or getting equipment that takes up lots of space. Would fast intense sets of bodyweight exercises count?

There is absolutely no need to join a gym in order to do Fast Exercise. The body weight exercises outlined in the book would be fine on 3 non-consecutive days a week. But also try skipping, walking, running and cycling outdoors with bursts of 20-60 seconds sprinting.

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:03:49

amimagic

This sounds really interesting to me. I've never got time to do any meaningful exercise (or inclination to make time!) and I'm pretty much totally sedentary.

I've lost nearly 2 stone on the 5:2 (thank you Michael!!) so am quite happy to give this a go too.

My question is, I'm sure i read or saw that this form of exercising doesn't work for everyone, and that Michael was one of the ones it didn't work for. Have I made this up? How can a few minutes give any real benefits, and is it dangerous?

Hi Amimagic,
Unfortunately exercise is unlikely to massively improve my aerobic fitness (heart and lungs) but i've found Fast Exercise does improve my glucose tolerance (how good my body is at dealing with sugar), my mood, my weight, my strength

PetaBee Mon 13-Jan-14 12:04:59

amimagic

This sounds really interesting to me. I've never got time to do any meaningful exercise (or inclination to make time!) and I'm pretty much totally sedentary.

I've lost nearly 2 stone on the 5:2 (thank you Michael!!) so am quite happy to give this a go too.

My question is, I'm sure i read or saw that this form of exercising doesn't work for everyone, and that Michael was one of the ones it didn't work for. Have I made this up? How can a few minutes give any real benefits, and is it dangerous?

amimagic

This sounds really interesting to me. I've never got time to do any meaningful exercise (or inclination to make time!) and I'm pretty much totally sedentary.

I've lost nearly 2 stone on the 5:2 (thank you Michael!!) so am quite happy to give this a go too.

My question is, I'm sure i read or saw that this form of exercising doesn't work for everyone, and that Michael was one of the ones it didn't work for. Have I made this up? How can a few minutes give any real benefits, and is it dangerous?

Absolutely. Much depends on your fitness bas point - if you haven't done much in a while, then walking is a great place to start. Try starting with a 5 minute moderate paced walk and adding a burst of 2 minutes fast walking. Or find a slight hill/slope of about 60-80 metres and walk fast to the top and slowly back down. Gradually increase the amount of 'bursts' you do.

MichaelMosley Mon 13-Jan-14 12:06:21

TheSporkforeatingkyriarchy

I can see the appeal and I remember discussing it at the time the Horizon programme came on. I see the evidence, but I wonder if promoting this fast attitude towards exercise is a good thing. The attitude around this is that this is all the one needs to do physically to improve health, when most current research shows that while people may not need more exercise, they do need to move a lot more and that if all you do in this and spend 95%+ percent of your time sitting around in the same patterns, then really on paper it won't be doing much good. The current attitude around exercise is already a problem and the promotion around this kind of exercise, rather than actual HIT, seems to feed into that which will not give the results that it surely aiming for - a healthier population.

If you buy the book then you will see that a big chunk is dedicated to moving more. I almost called it The Hunter Gatherer Workout. Exercise the way our bodies are designed. That means try to do 10,000 steps a day, do short bursts of intense stuff, some strength stuff and get enough rest

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