Sexist Asda ad cleared - feeling bit depressed about this verdict

(36 Posts)
ashesgirl Fri 01-Feb-13 10:26:13

www.guardian.co.uk/media/2013/jan/30/asda-christmas-ad?INTCMP=SRCH

So the Asda ad was deemed not likely to have caused widespread offence. 8 out of 10 women questioned said it didn't bother them and just reflected reality.

Does anyone else feel a bit disillusioned by this?

tribpot Wed 06-Feb-13 19:13:38

Mme, I can assure you I don't aspire to shop at Waitrose, donchaknow wink Although Waitrose (or indeed any other supermarket) could have released a spoof version of the Asda advert to great effect. I suggested on MN before Xmas that the better ad would have been the one where at the end Asda mum wakes up, it's still a fortnight before Xmas and it's all been a horrible dream. Her family all pitch in and both harmony and equality are achieved at the Asda house. If anything, the sexism came from Asda not thinking that would appeal to their demographic, but rather that they would prefer just to be put upon.

MmeLindor Germany Wed 06-Feb-13 18:57:40

Tribot put it perfectly.

This IS Asda's demographic and they weren't aiming for us middle class aspirational Waitrose shoppers.

Doesn't mean it isn't sexist, or realistic. Sadly it is the reality for many women.

Doing all the drudge work and not even getting a seat at the table.

It would have played MUCH better if they'd surprised her by all helping out at the last minute. Or showing their appreciation.

tribpot Wed 06-Feb-13 18:49:51

I'm not sure why the fact it was realistic made it not sexist.

I actually think Asda's intention was not to reinforce sexist stereotypes (which it did) but appeal to its core demographic (overworked women trying to make Christmas 'special') by showing that it, at least, understood how much bloody work they have to put into it. But this could have been funny or thought-provoking (in a good way) if Asda had chosen to subvert the stereotype instead of play to it. Instead it was just sad.

LifeIsBetterInFlipFlops Wed 06-Feb-13 18:39:00

Treats...I do exactly this, sitting on the odd chair when we have loads of people over. I want everybody to be comfortable and anyway I need easy access to the kitchen. I don't mind it at all...just love having the house full.

Treats - there's something also that I can't quite put my finger on about the chair thing. It's like a hang over from the old image of a woman making a meal for her family table but then standing in the kitchen feeding herself the left over bits. At least at Christmas, she can pull up a pouffe!

yousankmybattleship Wed 06-Feb-13 14:36:01

I'm a woman. I wasn't offended by it. In fact I quite liked it!

Treats Wed 06-Feb-13 14:33:28

Re: the chair thing (just to pick up on one bit of the advert). Why does she have to sit on the pouffe? If dad - or anyone else who was enjoying the food - genuinely appreciated her and the effort that she put in to organise Christmas, then they'd have sprung up to offer her their chair and sat on the pouffe themselves. Right?

The fact that the rest of the family were not bothered about her not having a proper chair to sit on demonstrated a real lack of respect for her. And the point of the ad was that it was meant to reflect what Christmas is 'really' like for lots of families. So for lots of families, it's routine to ignore or dismiss the effort that the women put in to make their lives better - and perfectly fine to take it for granted?

i get that you can interpret the overall ad in a more light hearted way, but this was the bit that stuck in my craw. If they'd changed that one thing, I might have been more inclined to shrug at it.

MidnightMasquerader Sun 03-Feb-13 16:47:20

The ad was highly representative - many (most) women related to the sexist set-up it depicted. Ergo: society is still highly sexist.

What's not to be disillusioned about?

It's fine if you like the ad and had a bit of a chuckle at it. But likewise it's also fine not to like the ad one little bit and be a bit saddened by yet another insidious message being put out there.

It's OK to have either viewpoint, or have one that falls somewhere in between.

StickEmUp Sun 03-Feb-13 09:47:18

The only thing that made me irk was the non seat at the end.

Te advert was very representative of my mothers experience, i believe.

MrsKeithRichards Sat 02-Feb-13 10:58:44

The advert riled me, even if it showed dad peeling spuds or helping with the dishes it would not have been so bad.

Jinsei Sat 02-Feb-13 10:52:46

I know it's "only" an advert, but when our children grow up surrounded by these images, I wonder what messages they absorb about what is "normal". Even if it reflects the reality, doesn't mean that's how it ought to be. sad I think it's a disappointing verdict.

ChestyLeRoux Sat 02-Feb-13 10:38:53

I see it as not true at all.Would a woman really try and put the xmas tree in the car if she had a husband? Or pump up the airbed? Its not very traditional to have a woman serving up the xmas dinner either.

landofsoapandglory Sat 02-Feb-13 10:36:32

I totally agree with nefertarii.

Fairylea Sat 02-Feb-13 10:29:25

I loved the advert. It showed how hard some women - like me - work to make it a good Christmas for the family. I don't consider it sexist. They could have had a stay at home dad doing it. Okay they didn't and that's a point but in the grand scheme of things I think it's fine..... and so did the majority of people (including women) obviously.

Sometimes we can all take life a bit too seriously.

FeckOffCup Sat 02-Feb-13 10:21:39

One I've noticed recently is the aldi washing powder one, where a mud covered child says "mum likes this powder (ariel) and this one (aldi) but she won't like this.". Because only mums are responsible for cleaning the kids up and washing sports kit?

LifeIsBetterInFlipFlops Sat 02-Feb-13 09:27:22

I'm pleased with the verdict, and didn't find the ad offensive. If anything it shows how much women (or someone) does to prepare for Christmas.

Same way that an ad showing a chap doing DIY and heavy gardening wouldn't offend me, although I do both.

nefertarii Sat 02-Feb-13 09:16:57

I would find threads like this amusing if they weren't so worrying.

Really 'control issues' are you serious?

The fact is women do alot of th Christmas stuff. Why?
Because there are infinitely women that are the sahp than men.
In alot of houses someone ends up on a temporary chair. So what. Would have prefer the advert to be about her moaning about having the chair?

Companies spend hundreds of thousands on advertising and know the demographic for these adverts is women.

Also I find the attitude that the 8 out of 10 women who gave their opinion are wrong and the 2 out of 10 must be right, quite sad really.

These threads always have an sit of superiority about them. As though the people who are offended are the intelligent ones and everyone else can't see what's going on.

and yet the irony of telling women that their opinion is wrong is lost.

AbigailAdams Sat 02-Feb-13 09:00:57

control issues?

kim147 Sat 02-Feb-13 08:54:02

Dad helps out - his choice of tree is overruled.
He moves the tree whilst his wife tells him where to put it.

She does everything else. Whilst he sits on his arse in the front room. Then asks her "What's for dinner?"

So much to discuss - control issues, lazy Dad issues.

AbigailAdams Sat 02-Feb-13 08:20:58

Even the imaginary "dad helps out" part of the advert is indicative they still think it is a woman's job to provide Xmas dinner. Dad is just there to provide assistance. You shove an ornament on the Xmas tree, carve the joint. Those little things to make your life so much easier hmm.

sashh Sat 02-Feb-13 08:16:26

Does anyone else feel a bit disillusioned by this?

I got the official report a couple of days ago with 'confidential' stamped all over it.

I'm disappointed because

a) they say dad helps out - er where?

b) just because it is reality for a number of mums does not make it nonsexist.

SushiPaws Fri 01-Feb-13 11:58:07

Asda advert made me feel awkward. I'd have been one of the 2 out of 10.

fallenangle Fri 01-Feb-13 11:55:06

I'd not seen the Morrisons one before now. Asda one was ultimately upbeat and had humour. 'Shop at Asda and, despite the stress everyone will have a good tim.' Morrisons dream ad came from a dark, dark place. 'Christmas is a nightmare, get your nightmare at Morrisons'
Waitrose went for, ! ' It s Christmas, we are Waitrose doing good, nuff said'.
I wonder which had most effect?

Panzee Fri 01-Feb-13 11:38:20

At least the Asda mum looked happy. The Morrisons mum looked like she wanted to kill herself.

CashmereHoodlum Fri 01-Feb-13 11:33:10

Gosh, I've just re-watched the advert and there are loads of things I forgot, like the tree and decorations. I forgot because DH did all that.

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