Guinea pigs, would this be OK?

(11 Posts)
Evenstar Sat 26-Jan-13 17:28:12

I have two girls, but have heard of two boys in need of a home as their owners are emigrating. They will be coming with their own hutch and run and are a bonded pair who have lived together happily for almost 2 years. other than keeping them seperate (for obvious reasons!) are there any other issues/problems I need to consider before I go to see them?

Ooooooohh this is one of those situations where people will say "I've got boars and sows and they're fine"

But- if the boars have been a pair with no female company then it might excite them too much and cause them to fight.(You wouldn't know how they react until you tried) Even if they don't physically contact the girls, they'll know that they're there.
My boars went on holiday last year and were very interested in the holding cages that there were 2 sows nearby. They were all "hello pretty lay-deez " but got a bit snippy with each other when they got home. That could just be the change of routine though (and they missed DD)
Neutering won't make a difference to their brains but you could if you wanted to neuter them and once they're 'safe' (about 4 weeks) have two boar/sow pairs.

Guinea websites don't advice two boars with sows,

I suppose you could ask the owners is they'd be prepared to neuter them before they give them to you?
It is a shame to upset the dynamics of an established pair (I've got 2 rescue brothers) . Have they got any other interested adopters? If it meant the boars going into Rescue, they might think that neutering and pairing up would be the best option?

LadyMargolotta Sat 26-Jan-13 17:43:26

The problem is if the boars can smell the females. That may cause them to fight with each other.

Yup, we had a similar situation and have ended up having to buy another sow so that we have 2 boar/sow partnerships.

Long story, had happy boar/sow partnership, left them with family while we were in Australia for a couple of years, brought two established boars back with us and then the original boar died sad

If it's any consolation the boars seem extremely happy with their new love lives - neutered of course - and the rumblestrutting is rather cute to watch!

Evenstar Sat 26-Jan-13 18:11:02

How far apart would they need to be? The girls are currently living in a hutch inside a shed, I had envisaged that the boars would be outside the shed in sheltered spot the other side of it, with a tarpaulin and a snuggle pad at night and would be moved into the garage if there was really severe weather. I haven't yet spoken to the owners so don't know if they are still looking for a home or what the situation would be with getting them neutered.

My girls actually belong to the pre-school where I work and are mother and daughter, and much loved by the children and I don't think I could re-pair them with the boys, or certainly not without consulting my manager. As the owners are offering them for nothing complete with all the equipment I think the cost of neutering would have to be mine. Does anyone have an idea of the cost of that? Thanks for replies

My boars cost about 40 pounds each to get neutered but I'm sure it varies around the country - West Mids here.

fortified kept her boar (Old Boy - recently dearly departed) side by sided with 2 sows after his brother died.
But it's the keeping of 2 boys together that's the problem when there's Girls in the offing.

It would be possible in theory if you kept them completely seperate and washed hands etc when handling them.
But a shame to risk upsetting a good boar combo if it didn't work.

Neutering would be possible at their age (2 is young) but wouldn't stop them being fighty amongst themselves only to stop pg.

(I heard a customer (buying a new pig in Pets @ Home) saying she spent £68 to neuter her boar). No idea if it was a P@H vet,independant or other.

That was what we found 70 and the scent of the sow on the sofa where she had had a cuddle was enough to start the teeth chattering from the boys the next time they were on there.

Sorry to say this but I don't think this is a good idea. A boar will do anything to get to just the smell of a sow. When we first had the girls OB broke both his lower teeth off gnawing his hutch bars to get to them. And that was with them living in the garage as it was summer. He had a very powerful voice and I could hear him wheek for them all the way down the garden with the doors open.

Then there was the, what I call 'guinea pig coat' don't I sound like Miranda's mum. Our stairs have a quarter turn at the bottom and I had hung the coat over the newel post. So in an attempt to get to the lovely girl smelling garment, OB managed to climb up 2 stairs shock. Guinea Pigs are not designed to climb back down again and he could have injured himself if I hadn't found him. He was very overcome with excitement at having girlfriends and they did all settle into a lovely relationship, it was better when he could see them everyday. However imo 2 boars will fight for dominance.

KRITIQ Mon 28-Jan-13 23:26:30

We looked after two adorable guest sows over Christmas, but they stayed in the guest room while our boars were in the living room. I don't think they were even aware of each other. I know of someone who had both boars and sows free range - one lot on one floor of the house, the other on the other, separated by a door and gate.

It's pretty risky, so unless you've got space to keep them waaaaaay apart, it's probably not a good idea.

Evenstar Tue 29-Jan-13 20:40:41

Thanks everyone, I think it does seem as though this wouldn't be a good idea, I had messaged the lady with details of my situation but haven't received a response so am leaving it.

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