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NOW CLOSED Share your top internet safety tips with TalkTalk and win a £250 Love2Shop voucher

(99 Posts)
TheOtherHelenMumsnet (MNHQ) Tue 05-Feb-13 10:37:29

To mark the 10th Safer Internet Day, which happened on Tues this week, TalkTalk want to hear your top tips for making sure you and your family use the internet safely.

Here is what TalkTalk say: "The internet is at the heart of our homes and is ultimately a great thing, but it does throw up a whole range of different challenges for parents. We want to help our customers keep their families safer online so we developed HomeSafe, the UK's only parental control service that's built into the broadband network itself and protects every device using the home internet. We want to encourage families to make every day a Safer Internet Day, by sharing their top internet safety advice with each other. If you're stuck for ideas then why not check out the recent internet safety expert Q&A we ran for Mumsnetters on the TalkTalk Better Off Hub."

What TalkTalk would love to know is:

~ How do you go about making sure your child(ren) use the internet safely? Do you set any rules about internet use? This could be on the home computer, tablet or mobile.

~ Have you ever had a conversation with your child(ren) about what kind of behaviour is appropriate and inappropriate online? If so, how did you broach the topic? How did the conversation go? Did you get across the message(s) you intended to?

~ What advice about using the internet safely, either for yourself, or your family, would you share with other Mumsnetters?

Everyone who posts their comments here will be entered into a prize draw to win a £250 Love2Shop voucher.

Thanks and good luck with the prize draw
MNHQ

MrsKwazii Tue 12-Feb-13 20:15:36

Yay Blathers!

Blatherskite Tue 12-Feb-13 18:17:56

<faints>

Thank you so much!

AlexMumsnet (MNHQ) Tue 12-Feb-13 15:01:05

Thanks everyone for your tips and comments. The prize draw has been made and the lucky winner is Blatherskite who wins a £250 Love2Shop voucher.

kelzw84 Mon 11-Feb-13 19:51:00

My son only use's my laptop when i am around, I have spoken to him about the dangers of the internet and what you can find and things that can happen,
He has his own email address which he needs for his online games that i only allow him to access whilst i am sat next to him.
He mostly only use's the net to play his online games and to search for help with his homework, although all sites he needs user names and passwords for we have a different one and i have explained that this is because some people can manage to access his account if he was using the same ones x

Silverlace Mon 11-Feb-13 16:23:39

I have set my laptop up with a user profile each for my DC and locked down everything with Norton.

I feel this is safe for them to use without me looking over their shoulder all the time but it is a pain when they are researching home work as it blocks so many sites.

I have had to have a chat with my DS as I found him in Club Penguin typing to another user "your igloo is rubbish". We had a chat about bullying and hurting others feelings. Since then he only uses areas where the chat is pre written.

We also have the laptop in the main sitting room, not hidden in an office.

PostBellumBugsy Mon 11-Feb-13 13:49:43

How do you go about making sure your child(ren) use the internet safely? Do you set any rules about internet use? This could be on the home computer, tablet or mobile.

I have always had the laptops/ PC in the kitchen/family room. As well as having parental controls on the devices, it also meant I could see what they were doing. Didn't have to stand over their shoulder but was just aware of what they were looking at.

~ Have you ever had a conversation with your child(ren) about what kind of behaviour is appropriate and inappropriate online? If so, how did you broach the topic? How did the conversation go? Did you get across the message(s) you intended to?

Yes, we've had lots of chats about online behaviour & safety. It happened very easily as the PCs & laptops were in the room, so I could easily talk about sites they were looking at. I've also been to a seminar on internet safety at my eldest's school, which gave me another oppotunity to talk about it. I also signed both my DCs up to facebook early enough that I could do it with them. This was a hugely good way to talk about all the really stupid stuff that other kids do!!!!!!!

~ What advice about using the internet safely, either for yourself, or your family, would you share with other Mumsnetters?

Attend an internet safety talk if you possibly can. Have good virus protection installed, good malware protection. Make sure your settings delete cookies, temp files etc at the end of an internet session. Don't have one password for everything & change passwords regularly.

Don't shy away from letting your DCs use the internet early. The younger they are the more likely they are to listen to your advice. Have fun with them and it - point out all the good & useful things & explain what is not so good, without scaring them witless. Don't "forbid" social networking & make them wait until they are a teenager & then wonder why they do stupid things.

LittleBallOfFur Mon 11-Feb-13 12:59:46

This is more from my experience as a teenager than from being a parent as my DS is still very young. My tip would be to have the computer in a communal area, as some have already suggested, e.g. living room, so that there can be no secretive logging on/dubious activity going unnoticed (like Snorbs says, keep an eye on what they get up to online).

I had a PC in my room when I was 16/17 and struck up a 'friendship' with a boy. Never quite got to meeting him, but almost did sensibility prevailed. And I still don't think my parents have any idea.

Clawdy Mon 11-Feb-13 10:48:57

Always use the mantra: Computers are wonderful - and dangerous. Be sensible.

MrsKwazii Sun 10-Feb-13 22:29:19

My DD is too young to use the internet yet, but when she is I'll be taking the latest advice and info from CEOPS - they provide information and advice about staying safe online.

My nephew is 13 and I follow him on Twitter and FB to keep in touch and keep a friendly eye on him. Have been able to alert him to a Twitter hack before and gently suggest that he deletes some FB posts - as an adult I can see the potential consequences of some posts much more clearly than he can. I'll be doing the same for DD when the time comes.

FrantasticO Sun 10-Feb-13 20:28:48

We have rules

No Internet use without adult in the vicinity, games i player etc ok as I veto first.

Yes we have had conversation re people could pretend or tell lies via Internet. Not been an issue yet as too young to be part of Facebook, joint games etc.
Oldest is 8.

Advice for MN would be to keep the computer or tablet in family space where activity can be monitored. Harder with older kids.

Cherrybright Sun 10-Feb-13 18:41:02

My dd is too young to use the net, so i dont have to worry just yet about her safety or chats.

My advice with internet safety is, only add to your social networks people you know. Check what your kids are looking at and keep laptops etc out of bedrooms

Mouseface Sun 10-Feb-13 15:08:59

~ How do you go about making sure your child(ren) use the internet safely? Do you set any rules about internet use? This could be on the home computer, tablet or mobile.

We have HomeSafe by TalkTalk and it's fantastic! Before that, we had a rule that ONLY homework was done one the PC and NOTHING else. DD is 14 and has her own iPhone, Netbook etc, I can't control what she goes on out of the home, which does concern me but we've spoken about the dangers of crooming, porn sites, entering her personal details on websites for games etc.

~ Have you ever had a conversation with your child(ren) about what kind of behaviour is appropriate and inappropriate online? If so, how did you broach the topic? How did the conversation go? Did you get across the message(s) you intended to?

Yes, especially once she got her own 'devices' that enabled her to gain internet access away from the home. We talked about stranger danger and how there are people out there in chat forums and on FB, Twitter who may not be all that they seem. We just sat and talked about it, I also explained that I could go through her browsing history at any time and that I would do, even the deleted stuff, should I feel that she may not be keeping to the rules set out.

(We have a friend who works in IT and can do this for us, even if she deletes her browsing history)

~ What advice about using the internet safely, either for yourself, or your family, would you share with other Mumsnetters?

Use a service provider such as TalkTalk who can provide HomeSafe or similar and then YOU can choose what your child can view in the home. It's fantastic and will block ANYTHING inappropriate, (I get a notice as the account holder, telling me that something has been blocked and why when I'm on-line as I control the settings) so I have piece of mind that all family members are safe from things that they shouldn't be viewing!

Lilypie10 Sun 10-Feb-13 11:17:58

I just really wanted to bring awareness to any parents out there who let there children have access to the Kindle Fire products. I bought two for my children only to discover that in the App Store under Entertainment, right next to apps that children would be drawn to (ie, The Snowman, WWF etc) were FREE porn apps - I could not believe that on a product marketed at families, my children were one click away from accessing free porn. I applied parental restrictions but the apps were still visible. The only way to delete these apps is to delete the whole App Store from the device.

I contacted Amazon and they basically tried to say it must be a bad batch and that they had not come across this before. I returned the products but felt very concerned that the company were not bothered by this, even though David Cameron has pledged to make it harder for children to access porn on the Internet. Here is a household name company making it FREELY available in an App Store.

However, last week when visiting a friend, she happened to mention that her son had got a Kindle Fire for his birthday and I asked if I could check out the App Store as explained that I had bought two from a 'dodgy batch'. But my friend and I were both shocked to see at last 7 Free Porn apps in the entertainment section such as HOt India Babes/ Espanol Sex/ SEx positions etc. my friend clicked on one to see what would happen if her son had done the same and it opened up graphic porn pictures with links to more hardcore porn sites.

IS THIS ACCEPTABLE AMAZON???
No one seems to be taking this seriously or interested at all and I cannot believe I am the only parent outraged by this disgusting disregard for our children.
I have contactd watchdog, The Daily Mail and The Guardian and none of the reporters have responded. Are they in Amazons pocket?
I am turning to you lovely mums out there to let you know so that you can check your Kindle Fires for these apps and please if you find them on there and think like me, please let me know so we can get this to public attention.
Thank you!

MariusEarlobe Sun 10-Feb-13 10:53:19

Internet has to be used in the living room or kitchen so that we can see what is on the screen when passing, I do not stand over put I do glance on the way past.

I have talked to dc about people not always being who they say they are on the internet.

I know passwords for the things she uses, I monitor it.

As she is only 10 I sometimes log in and check messages on Moshi Monsters and such.

Anifrangapani Sat 09-Feb-13 23:18:24

Use an ISP that can provide a fixed address so you can log onto a Citrix server. That way you don't have to drive in the snow.

greengoose Sat 09-Feb-13 14:03:18

My top tip would be to find out what your kids do at friends houses. We have had to stop any visits to by our ten year old to one of his friends houses, because a little digging told us that the other kid was not being monitored at all while on Internet.
At home we keep DC in the same room, and have the parental controls quite well sorted. YouTube is the one to be careful of, so quick to open something wrong, and then be linked to lots of other clips too.
Our kids are too young (we think) for social networking, but I'm dreading that becoming a problem.... It's hard enough for adults! And quite rightly teenagers don't want mums peering over their shoulders... I guess we just hope our sons will have a moral compass firmly fitted by then, but that might be asking a bit much of them!

emilywq Sat 09-Feb-13 13:07:29

Message deleted by Mumsnet for breaking our Talk Guidelines. Replies may also be deleted.

mummyofcutetwo Fri 08-Feb-13 19:15:19

Biggest tip would be to keep the device within your range so you can keep a quiet tab on what your LO is up to, without him feeling you're constantly looking over his shoulder.

Our 4 year old knows what he can and can't do, and is excellent at sticking to the rules (long may it last!). My biggest problem is older children showing him unsuitable games etc even when they've been told repeatedly not to. Then he's just told he can't play games with them again for a period of time.

We've not had to talk to him about chatting to people as he's only four. Not looking forward to that one! Just wish kids could be left to be kids without having to explain about nasty people in the big bad world...

zipzap Fri 08-Feb-13 14:41:37

The day after doing this, ds1 came home all fired up about internet safety because they had had a policewoman come to school to talk about it - this was something the school had organised and hadn't mentioned in any newsletters or said that they were doing, they were assuming pupils would tell parents they had done it I suppose.

Talking to ds about it afterwards, one of the main things he had taken away was the fact that people walking past him might read over his shoulder and steal his information so you should always use the PC with the door closed so strangers can't walk past and steal your info. Which is great - except for the fact that at his age - 7 - he's not using the computer out and about. He's using it at home. And I want him to keep the door open so I can see what he's using and what's happening - there aren't random strangers walking around the house and if there were I'd be a hell of a lot more worried about other things happening than them stealing his data! Even after telling him this, he was still a bit nervous about using the pc with the door open as it was different from what the policewoman had told him was right.

This lead me to think of a couple of things to add to this...

1. Talk to your child's school about what they do to teach children about internet safety. Ideally this should be done from infant school onwards - as soon as they are telling children to use Google for their homework and integrated into regular reminders throughout teaching. It's not a one off thing - as children get older and their use of the internet increases and varies, they need updated, age-appropriate reminders.

2. Find out from the school when they are doing internet safety sessions and then talk to your child afterwards to see what they have been taught, to make sure 1) that they have remembered the information and 2) haven't come away with any mixed messages as happened for ds.

WowOoo Fri 08-Feb-13 10:52:19

Rules:
My eldest son is 6.
The computer is in full view on kitchen table. Everyone can see.
The dc are only allowed to play on the iPad around me. This is more so I know they're looking after it, rather than internet safety. (they only play games or apps as I have hidden Google)

Conversations?:
I have spoken to my 6 year old about searching on YouTube. I want him to be careful, so I have asked him not to.

He was doing a skateboard search that I thouhgt was OK. A gang of skateboarders were talking - swearing and smoking spliffs. He didn't notice the drugs, but he was in awe of the swearing and was most unhappy when I made him turn it off!

I have spoken to him about only having friends he actually knows in real life on Moshi Monsters. I need to talk about this again.

Advice:Keep the computer/tablet device in full view for as long as you can. Talk about what they could see, why they should be wary.
When a child is older, it depends how trustworthy and sensible they are.
For now, my eldest is not allowed to take the iPad into his bedroom. It's mine!

jennywren123 Thu 07-Feb-13 23:56:38

~ How do you go about making sure your child(ren) use the internet safely? Do you set any rules about internet use? This could be on the home computer, tablet or mobile.

Our main computer is in the kitchen with the screen facing outwards (ie not hidden) so we can see what websites they are using.

~ Have you ever had a conversation with your child(ren) about what kind of behaviour is appropriate and inappropriate online? If so, how did you broach the topic? How did the conversation go? Did you get across the message(s) you intended to?

Yes, we have had various conversations explaining what is appropriate. They have had numerous sessions on Internet safety at school. I think they are pretty clued up, but it's so easy to fall into a trap, isn't it?

~ What advice about using the internet safely, either for yourself, or your family, would you share with other Mumsnetters?

No Internet access in bedrooms for children.

phyliszaltman9 Thu 07-Feb-13 21:23:52

Message deleted by Mumsnet for breaking our Talk Guidelines. Replies may also be deleted.

Smudging Thu 07-Feb-13 19:34:47

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Also, arrange for your replacement cards to be sent to your local branch for collection. That's not really to do with the internet though.

Quick tip for the adults and any teens that have a youth bank account -

If you haven't set up internet banking, do it now. Populate it with your passwords and security questions before some fucking arsehole intercepts your replacement debit card in the post and sets it up on their own behalf in order to empty your account or launder cheques. angry

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