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NOW CLOSED: Share your thoughts on keeping your baby warm at night with the team behind Grobags – £250 prize up for grabs

(181 Posts)
AnnMumsnet (MNHQ) Mon 12-Nov-12 13:29:57

The team at The Gro Company have asked us to find out your opinions and experiences of keeping your baby warm during the winter months.

The Gro Company say "Around 95% of UK parents of newborns choose to use a baby sleeping bag to keep their baby safe and snug during sleep and naptimes. In order to comply with the current British Safety Standard for baby sleep bags, Grobag does not offer a product with sleeves which means these parents sometimes feel concerned about their babies having chilly arms.

Designed to complement the multi-award winning Grobag, the new Gro-Suit keeps the baby's arm warm with thick quilted sleeves while the rest of the suit is a single cotton layer. Worn inside a Grobag it provides the perfect balance of warm arms and a safer body temperature."

They've chatted to parents before and find that often parents, who feel that their baby's arms and hands feel cold to the touch in colder winter months, are tempted to add extra layers to their children's bedding, which could potentially reduce the safety of the sleep environment.

So please share on this thread
~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night
~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?
~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?
~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?
~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?

Any other comments welcome - the team from The Gro Company are on hand on facebook to answer any queries you have but will also respond to queries raised on this thread.

Add your comments below - everyone who does will be entered into a prize draw where one winner will get Gro company products including Grobags and vouchers for high street stores to the value of £250.

Thanks,
MNHQ

prakattack Wed 21-Nov-12 11:50:32

Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night
~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?
I did sometimes worry a bit when their hands were very very cold but used to reassure myself that if they were cold they'd wake up. I always felt the back of their neck to check they were warm. My babies were NOT good sleepers so they would definitely have woken if they were too cold!
~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?
Usually touch - always to the back of the neck as hands/ feet can be misleading.
~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?
Yes I knew that. I also didn't use a sleeping bag until they were six months and in their own cot - I felt safer that way as I did worry about using bags on newborns. It felt safer once they could move around.
~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?
These sound like a really good idea but I think cost would be a prohibiting factor for me.

costumequeen Tue 20-Nov-12 16:16:36

My dd was a winter baby, so we worried about her getting chilly when she was tiny. We had a gro egg in her room and also checked her hands for temp. We use long sleeved vests and baby grows with a sleeping bag and add blankets if it's a really cold night. We tend to use pjs now and occasionally still a sleeping bag as she likes them! (now age 2). Prob wouldnt use one with sleeves as I would worry about over heating, especially when they're small.

AnnMumsnet (MNHQ) Tue 20-Nov-12 10:47:41

Hello - thanks for all your feedback. Am pleased to say Strugglingtothinkofanickname has been selected as the winner of the Gro company products including Grobags and vouchers for high street stores to the value of £250. Well done - I will PM you now.

DonaStColumb Tue 20-Nov-12 09:39:33

~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night
I dont recall having particular concerns about the cold. We had a heater for baby's room, which we set to come on/ go off automatically if the temperature went below/ above 18c.

~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?
No I didnt tend to worry about babys arms. I used to check the back of her neck to gauge how warm she was and judge from this. I dont recall her arms or hands getting particularly cold.

~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?
We used both.

~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?
We used a baby sleeping bag until she was 2 1/2 years. I always assumed they didnt have sleeves so baby keep a little cooler if it was hot, as they were unable to kick the covers off in a sleeping bag.

~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?
I dont think it is a good idea. I think it is better to try keep the room at a certain temperature rather than risk making baby too warm.

lottiegarbanzo Tue 20-Nov-12 08:50:16

Dd is 8 months. We use sleeping bags, have done since about eight weeks. Before that she was wrapped in a blanket.

We have a thermometer on the monitor and I am very aware of her room temperature as our house is cool, drafty and hard (or v expensive) to keep warm. inevitably it gets colder at night when heating is off. I was pleasantly surprised to find that our cool 16-18 norm is the recommended range for babies. We've put heating on earlier in the autumn than usual and higher, to keep it at 16 at night. We are also having sash windows reconditioned with draft excluders fitted, adding new radiators and improving insulation in other ways.

I have to say I am not particularly concerned about arms. At 16-18c dd wears a babygro in a 2.5 tog bag. If it may get colder she wears a long sleeved vest underneath, aimed at keeping her torso warm but also covering her arms. I think that's enough.

poppy1973 Tue 20-Nov-12 07:39:48

Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night: I purchased a grobag early on when having children as I found them great when I had wriggly children.

~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?

Yes I would constantly worry about my baby being cold at night. We have always lived in cold old houses and so I used to keep a constant eye on the temperature.
~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?

I initially used a room thermometer and stuck this in the bedroom to check the right temperature and then purchased a baby monitor that would give a room reading on the temperature.

~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?

I always used a grobag for my little ones. I made sure I had the right tog for winter and a light one for the warmer months. I liked the grobag as I found them a good way to keep the baby warm, especially when mine used to wriggle around the cot. I used a grobag and then put a blanket on the baby just so it had something to kick off if it got too hot. Mine use to like the feel of a blanket and liked having to touch. I was always a little concerned that they would have cold hands - I have terrible problems with cold hands myself so was always concerned that this would wake them up.

~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby grobag?

I think initially it is a good idea. I was never really concerned about the arms getting cold but the hands - so don't think this would have helped me. If the babies are in the right temperature and have a grobag on then I wouldn't worry about covering their arms. This is my opinion. I have always tried to make sure that room temperature was at 18.5-19 in the winter time and try and keep this temperature by timing the heating to come at certain times in the early hours. I still prefer the standard original grobag.

notcitrus Tue 20-Nov-12 04:05:45

Have used baby sleeping bags inc Grobags for both children. When very cold, would wrap a blanket around them too, up to underarm level, which presumably is as safe as blankets as bedding.

Antenatal classes told me babies were supposed to have cold arms and hands so I tried not to worry. I touch their chest to gauge temp instead.

I used a thermometer when ds was very small but the room was rarely officially warm enough, but he seemed happy and healthy so tried not to worry. I usually touch rather than take temp to confirm if too hot, though.

I wasn't aware of the safety regs, but getting baby into sleeves on a grobag would be very fiddly and harder to adjust for temp than just adding more clothes, so wouldn't want sleeves anyway.

I don't see the point of the new product - just adding a cardie over a sleepsuit would be more flexible.

xxxkadzxxx Mon 19-Nov-12 23:59:26

~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night
We have always used Grobags or sleeping bags for our baby to ensure she stays warm.

~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?
I do often worry about her arms being cold, i always touch them and if they are i pop the cover over them a bit more to try to warm them up.

~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?
We have never used a thermometer in her room but we do touch her a lot to keep an eye on her temperature.

~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?
Yes we often use baby sleeping bags, i wasn't aware they are not allowed to have arms/sleeves but have often wondered why they dont!

~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?
I love it, it would save me a lot of worry for me and ensure my baby keeps warm. I also really appreciate how unique this product is and the research which has gone into this product. I like the way the company have recognised and worked around the safety regulations to invent something so good.

izzyishavingababyAGAIN Mon 19-Nov-12 23:28:20

~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night

~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?

We co-sleep, I have tried numerous things but eventually, baby on top of our duvet in the middle with own blanket, DC1 loved grow bags, 2 and 3 hated them.

~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?
Just touch and the radiators are individually thermostated, we have a warm house though as it is fairly new.

~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?

I have used them and have one for baby about to arrive - I didnt know about the BS regulations, I always wondered why they have no arms.

~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?

Yes def, I hate their little arms being cold when they peak them out of blankets. Id probably use them not with gro bags as well.

Welovecouscous Mon 19-Nov-12 22:45:47

Loved gro bags for the first 6 months and then have co slept

hellymelly Mon 19-Nov-12 22:18:10

My overall views on keeping my baby warm at night :- well I've always co-slept, but dd2 was in a sleeping bag too as she didn't like covers. I was next to her so could judge if she was getting cold too.
Did I worry about my baby's arms getting cold?
yes.And they sometimes did.
And how did I judge if she was warm or cold?
By feeling her.
Did I have a room thermometer?
there was one on the baby monitor, so until I joined her in bed I would keep an eye on that. After that I would be with her so able to judge for myself.
Did I use a baby sleeping bag and was I aware that to comply with safety standards they should not have sleeves?
I did use one, and no I wasn't aware about the sleeves. I'm sure I saw some with zip-off sleeves when i was looking for sleeping bags.
What do I think of the new product?
I think I would have bought it for DD2 if it had been around then. She had a knitted organic wool bag, and I put her in layers underneath depending on the weather, but she did sometimes get cold hands and arms.

~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night

I loved / love Grobags because I felt they took out all the guesswork - plus they didn't fall off. My second child is 6 weeks old and now in a Grobag and it's good not to have to faff with cellular blankets. With my first I also swaddled in a thin cotton sheet.

~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?

I did worry about it with my first - I still hate feeling their icy little hands! But I mentioned it to my health visitor who said core temperature was the important thing, so that's what I remind myself.

~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?

Touch these days - with my first I had that free thermometer you get with your Grobag stuck to the wall. My monitor also has a temperature gauge, but it's ludicrously inaccurate, it generally claims it's 12 degrees which it certainly isn't! I have a wireless thermostat and it lives in the baby's room, so I can be sure it's 18 degrees in there.

~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?

I do. I didn't know that but I did see a bag with sleeves once and felt instinctively that it would be too warm.

~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?

Possibly - but I'm surprised it doesn't have fold down sleeves. That's what I do on cold nights - ensure the built in scratch mits are folded down to keep her hands warm.

Nigglenaggle Mon 19-Nov-12 21:06:38

~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night
We tend to rely alot on heating the room itself to the correct temperature, rather than dressing to fit, but it does mean the heating bill has gone up alot!

~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?
Sometimes, mainly if there are problems with the boiler/radiators and we can't get the room warm enough. He always sleeps in a long sleeved baby gro, obviously

~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?
Yes we use a gro egg and aim for 17c

~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?
Yes, always. I wasn't aware of the regulations and would be interested to know why. My mum did make a long sleeved one which was great for winter (it was snug round the neck and didnt slip) but not that easy to get him in and out of.

~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?
I quite like it. I might use it I think. I've often wondered what the perfect solution might be

Leafmould Mon 19-Nov-12 21:05:31

Did a lot of co- sleeping in the early days so I could tell if it was too cold/ hot easily.

My grandmother knitted my baby a beautiful woollen sleeping bag with sleeves which was great in the winter. I had no idea this was not compliant with safely standards, and really don't see what the potential danger of it could be.

I think that new parents get very anxious about this issue and am slightly skeptical about products which could be perceived as preying on this anxiety.

NiceBiscuits Mon 19-Nov-12 20:58:24

~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night. For my first baby this was a massive worry for me. I was given a very alarming leaflet about cot death by the midwives when I left hospital and spent the next six weeks extremely anxious about it. It was a worrying experience.
~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm? I didn't worry about their arms being too cold as they wore long sleeve vests and a sleep suit. I was more worried about overheating.
~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature? A room thermometer. I didn't feel confident just going by touch.
~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms? Yes, do use them. No didn't know that it was a BS regulation.
~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro? As a first time parent I would have been really interested in the product, less so second time around

silverfrog Mon 19-Nov-12 20:47:13

~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night

I do tend to worry about them getting cold at night - little hands feeling so icy does seem wrong. but it is tricky to know what to do, as obviously putting too many layers on could be dangerous.

~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?

I check their core body temperature (neck and/or chest) and try not to worry too much about the icy hands! I do make a point of holding cold hands while doing night feeds, to warm them up a bit!

~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?

I don't use a room thermometre anymore (ds is third baby). I found that I would disregard what it said anyway, and go by touch, and the fact that both dds got through babyhood ok means I trust my instincts more.

~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?

yes, I do. I only use sleeping bags that are properly tog rated too, even thhough they tend to be more expensive than supermarket ones.

~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?

it does look interesting, but I do wonder whether ds would end up with cold hands anyway - surely some of it is down to circulation? and also, I prefer sleepsuits to not have integrated feet - all 3 of my children have been oddly proprtionedm and the feet on sleepsuits never fit them!

PeazlyPops Mon 19-Nov-12 20:41:37

~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night

I worry a lot about this. I use a gro-egg thermometer in my baby's room, and have our central heating set to 17.5 degrees over night, so the temperature doesn't drop too much.

~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?

I do worry about this, so I dress him in a long-sleeved vest, with a sleepsuit or pyjamas over the top. I judge if he is too cold or warm by feeling his chest or back.

~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?

A bit of both. I find that when it drops to 18c, the gro-egg says it's ok, but it is actually too cold for my baby, and so check him to be sure he isn't too cold or hot

~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?

I do use baby sleeping bags. We're using 2.5 tog at the moment. I wasn't aware that they shouldn't have arms.

~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?

It looks like a good idea, but i'd be concerned that my baby would get too hot! I'd need to see it in a shop before buying, it's not something i'd buy online without seeing first.

3bunnies Mon 19-Nov-12 20:41:15

Gro bags were great when my dc were small, as they were all wrigglers! Just wish there was something I could put them in now which they could still get out of for night time potty trips etc.

I did worry about the arms a bit, in the winter we had a slightly cooler gro bag than needed but added a warm babygrow. We also found it a particular problem when camping. We took snowsuits and gloves to keep them warm in the tent overnight.

We didn't use a room thermometer, but they were in our room for first year so we were v close to them. And they woke for food all the time, so if they were cold/hot were soon aware of it.

We don't use babygros now, but only ever used them without arms.

I might buy the suit if it was my pfb, but if I had another baby now I wouldn't bother, also I would get annoyed if it was another thing to wash when they had an explosive poo. Some arm + handwarmers (like a long sock) over the arm might be a better solution, as it would be less likely to get so dirty, would grow with the baby more, but still wouldn't affect core body temp. Can I have intellectual rights on that idea!!!!??!

missorinoco Mon 19-Nov-12 20:31:52

~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night

I have used Grobags for all of my children. I think they are great for keeping the infant warm and covered. I do worry about the arms being cold, mainly in winter when I am aware how cold my arms get. If they wake frequently when the temperature drops I wonder if they are cold. If it's hot I either leave the GRobag off, although it's a sleep cue for them, or I have a summer Grobag that has sadly not been needed of late.

~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?

I use a thermostat now, which is in the youngest child's room, and the heating kicks in when the temperature drops below my preset value. I also go by how they feel.

Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?

It rings a bell.

~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?

Yes, I would have, although by next winter mine will be out of them. I would buy it as a present though.

MysteriousNameChange Mon 19-Nov-12 20:18:53

~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night
I did worry about them being too hot or cold. In winter it was a little unnerving how cold extremities could get!

~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?
I know it's normal but it still worries me a bit. Normally would touch skin at back of neck or front of chest to see if warm.

~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?
I have a few cheapie (paper) room thermometers, and the baby listening device records it too.

~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?
I did when my DS was little and will do again. I vaguely knew that they shouldn't but wasn't too sure why.

~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?
Possibly if given one but I suspect it would be considerably more expensive than a supermarket baby gro.

~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night

I used Grobags and the room thermometer and also used to keep the heating on (very low, 15 degrees) when they were very tiny so it didn't drop too low. Still using a Grobag for my 21mo. If it seems very cold then I put a long sleeved vest under pyjamas or a sleepsuit (under the grobag). I think the Grobag is great, mine have never woken up being cold as babies.

~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?

The only time I worried was when we went camping but I have never worried at home. I tend to judge based on how warm/cold I am and also used a room thermometer when they were very little.

~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?

Used a room thermometer when they were under 1, now just go on how many layers I need.

~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?

Yes but I wasn't aware they were not supposed to have sleeves, I think I have seen some that do?

~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?

No, our house is fairly warm and well insulated so I don't think I would have needed it but I'm sure some parents will find it good.

ScaredySquirrel Mon 19-Nov-12 19:14:17

yes agree - I would probably rather use a cardigan, which would get more than one day's use out my baby.

ScaredySquirrel Mon 19-Nov-12 19:13:06

~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?

yes.My baby (6 months) does have sleeping bags, and she co-sleeps with me. She sleeps on top of the duvet, but i worry about her arms getting cold. I live in a cold house, but it gets too warm to leave the heating on all night. I Judge by feeling her, and also what it feels like to me, my baby monitor receiver beeps when it is too hot.

~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?

No. touch. But I can judge pretty well now (was obsessed with my first baby though - had a grobag thermometer and was always checking it.

~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?

I do use a sleeping bag. I am on my 6th baby. with my last baby I had a grobag with detachable sleeves which I liked.I wasn't aware that they weren't allowed to have sleeves (although the instructions with the sleeping bag did state that the sleeves were only meant to be used when the baby was outside/in the car seat , but I kept them on anyway for the coldest winter nights) I liked having sleeves as baby gets cold now. (Would stop though if, say, the FSID say they were unsafe though).

~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby bro?

YOur products are too expensive for me generally sorry - I buy other sleeping bags. But depends on the price I suppose!

zipzap Mon 19-Nov-12 17:51:17

~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night
I lived in a very hot flat when ds1 was small - the problem was usually keeping him cool rather than worrying about him being too cold. There was only once where I was really worried about him being cold, when we were staying elsewhere, it was snowy outside and the heating wasn't working in our room. ds was cold but I preferred to put a couple of thin extra layers on him (tshirts/cardigans) - think this is easier than having a special sleeve suit! And if it was really cold, I would put a thick fleece on outside the grobag. The nights I was worried about ds being cold I also put a hat on him - wouldn't ever do this normally but I was under a very thick duvet and had thick pjs on, plus a jumper and I was freezing myself, you could see your breath on the air!

~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?
I judged either by giving them a kiss on the forehead or back of the neck - lips seem to be good at gauging temperature. Or feeling the back of their neck (ie the bit that was in the grobag, not a bit out in the open - having made sure my hands were not freezing first. I'd also look at them - if they were cold they used to scrunch themselves up. If they were hot they would be all stretched out.

~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?
Touch to gauge temperature - but the baby monitor did have a temperature reading on it so would occasionally check, particularly if it was very hot.

~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?
Yes - used grobags for both ds. DS2 still likes to snuggle his despite being 4.5!
And yes, I did know that they shouldn't have sleeves in them.

~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?
Not sure about the sleeved suit - mostly because it's a baby gro. If it had been a soft cardigan then would have considered it if I lived in a cold place or was going to be going to cold places lots. Problem with babygros is that if you have a baby that has a tendency to do leaky poo nappies then you are going to need lots of them or need to wash them out quickly. if you have a cardigan version, then chances are you're going to get several wears out of it before you need to wash it, even if your baby has a leaky nappy. And if you use your grobag in the car when travelling, a cardigan version would be great because you could use it in the car when you needed it, or for transferring baby from car to indoors (I loved the travelling grobags, they were really handy!) but then you could easily take it off when it wasn't needed (once you were indoors and warmed up) without disturbing the baby too much. whereas it would be a real faff to try to take a babygro off a warm cosy sleepy child and put a different one on - the cardigan version of thick sleeves, thin body you could put over the top of the grobag and it would be easy to slip on or off when needed.

JollyJock Mon 19-Nov-12 17:48:40

~ Your overall views and experiences of keeping your baby (or your child when they were a baby) warm at night
I did worry. And I followed the instructions that come with baby sleeping bags about how much my child should wear to begin with. Then i gave up and just put him in what I thought looked right. he always seemed too cold when I followed the instructions.
~ Did you or do you worry about your baby's arms being cold at night? How do you judge if they are cold or too warm?
If it is cold enough for his arms to be cold then I put him in a long sleeved sleepsuit. If it's very cold he gets a long sleeved vest AND a long sleeved sleep suit
~ Do you use a room thermometer or use touch to gauge temperature?
We have a room thermometer on our baby monitor
~ Do you use a baby sleeping bag? Are you aware that to comply with British Safety regulations, baby sleeping bags should not have sleeves/arms?
yes and no.
~ What do you think about this new product? Do you think it's something you'd use in the winter months as an alternative to a standard baby gro?
Sounds good for panicky PFB mothers. I'm quite happy with standard baby gros and vests.

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