Decent lino-type flooring (RhinoFloor?) or Karndean etc?

(12 Posts)
Andrea1956 Thu 27-Mar-14 17:57:11

Dont go for Krndean their guarantee for wear and tear will not be upheld and they ignore you once they have written to tell you the faded tiles are not their problem. My tiles have a 15 year guarantee against wear and tear and on 7 tiles the pattern has disappeared after only 2 years. They are now ignoring trading standards too! Expensive mistake!!

KindleMum Sat 09-Mar-13 14:22:16

I'm currently looking at Windmoller Laguna and Bacana. We had Amtico before which I liked. But this stuff is a German, new to the UK product and is meant to be cheaper and more durable and able to be taken up and relaid if needed as it's a kind of click-together system. I'm quite taken with it but I haven't bought it yet.

partystress Sat 09-Mar-13 13:34:59

We're just about to replace the Rhinofloor we have in our kitchen. It has been v disappointing. Dropped knives have left deep marks, and it does not recover well after having heavy furniture standing on it. Will be putting in Karndean as we have it in the rest of downstairs. Not sure if it will be equally easy to damage with sharp knives but it has withstood dog claws, shoes, and heavy furniture v well. Looks fab too - 5 years on from fitting.

shockers Sat 09-Mar-13 10:13:58

Marmoleum comes in larger sheets, but needs fitting by an expert. We had a beautiful sea green bathroom floor in our old house, costing about £250 for an area approx 6'x5'. As soon as I can justify changing the bathroom floor here, I'm going for that again.

PigletJohn Sat 09-Mar-13 10:05:19

BTW when you say "lino" then unless you are living in a house that has not had a new floor in 60 years, you probably mean vinyl.

PigletJohn Sat 09-Mar-13 10:02:39

what you are describing is not poor-quality flooring, but poor-quality fitting. Maybe it was a DIY job.

Sheet flooring settles and spreads out after fitting, so for the best job, it is laid and left to settle for a week or so before coming back to trim the edges. Edges can sometimes be tucked under the skirting. White silicone sealant can be used to fill the joint between flooring and skirting or radiator pipes, when the flooring has stopped moving, which gives the appearance of an invisible joint, which is spill- and ant-proof.

Another point is that a lot of the residential vinyl flooring is foam-backed, which makes it warm and comfortable in a bathroom, but it easily marks and indents in a kitchen when you roll or stand an appliance on it, or drop a fork or a knife which may puncture it. My commercial premises have a very hard sheet flooring, turned up at the edges against the walls, and sealed, to withstand splashes or spills. I think it cost about £800 for a very small staff food area, about 3m x 2m. It came from a specialist fitter.

RobotHamster Sat 09-Mar-13 09:29:58

We didn't use karndean though,just normal lino. Just bought the thickest one we could afford.

RobotHamster Sat 09-Mar-13 09:28:50

We put the lino under the units, so not visible at the edges there, and fitted new skirting and put it right under that too. Looks v neat.

weakestlink Sat 09-Mar-13 09:20:52

I have Karndean and whilst it is gorgeous there are some tiles which have slightly moved apart so not seamless like other poster has said. And I used a Karndean approved fitter. For the cost on balance I would now say its not worth it.
Apparently Polyfloor is much cheaper and comparable...

GreenEggsAndNichts Fri 08-Mar-13 23:35:40

hm that's something to consider, though I'm not sure about the tile shrinkage. I don't mind paying for a decent product, I just don't want to pay for something I don't need to.

I would consider Karndean et al but I know DH will balk at the cost, so I'd like to know if there are other options which won't look cheap.

I am especially worried about the look around the edges of the floor.

gemma4d Fri 08-Mar-13 23:20:12

Not sure if it's what you are after, but I have Tarkett Marmoleum (marmoleum not linoleum) in my kitchen. Mine came in tiles but I think it also comes in sheets.

It pulled up when my washing machine had a slow leak, but I don't think you can blame it for that. I've had it since 2008 and it hasn't pulled up other than that, and has lasted well. My one gripe is that I think the tiles may have shrunk very, very slightly so you can see where each tile meets, rather than it all merging seamlessly.

It is definitely better than the bog standard (but cheaper!) big rolls of Lino that you can buy anywhere. But then it's more expensive!

GreenEggsAndNichts Fri 08-Mar-13 23:00:47

Is it possible to have decent, hardwearing lino flooring? Something which doesn't look trimmed and pulling up around the edges?

If we have to, we'll spring for something pricey like Kardean. I'll be having a nice kitchen put in, so I would like a good floor. I don't want tiles as I would like a tiny bit of give to the floor if I'm standing on it a lot.

We've always rented, and every linoleum floor we're seen has looked the part - you can see where it's been cut and where the edge stops before the wall. If you're very unlucky, it's already curling up a bit. Is this the inevitable fate of all linoleum, or just particularly cheap/ poorly installed lino?

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