How would you feel if your ds was the only boy in his yr when starting reception?

(34 Posts)
educator123 Wed 27-Feb-13 20:56:24

Just that really? How much does it matter/not matter?

TheBuskersDog Wed 27-Feb-13 22:45:32

But even if all four children starting were boys he would go through school with a small potential friendship group. I think in such a small school he is bound to play with children from other years anyway so I would see how it goes, you can always choose to move him when he is older if you think it is a problem.
One of the drawbacks of any small school is the small pool of potential friends, regardless of gender, which needs to be weighed up against the advantages. Your older children have been fine there and chances are he will be too.

educator123 Wed 27-Feb-13 22:52:05

Thank you my dd1 one has been fine although struggling a little now her best friend has left sad and DD2 Is in reception so early days. Dh is keen to make a move before ds starts to save more disruption and also to avoid dds moving too far through the school before a move! As dd1 will be in yr4 when he starts!

Trekkie Wed 27-Feb-13 23:19:16

You know the school well though, and you like it, and it's not as if he's the only boy in a class of 20, he is one boy in an intake of 4!!! And he will play with the Yr1 boys - at DD school they all mix and your school is even smaller. Any discrepancies in sex / age distributions through the school will be offset by it being small & caring & inclusive & let's mix everyone up - as you mention.

I think removing your 2 DDs where they are settled because of this when actually it'll probably be fine seems not great.

TBH I went to large-ish primary schools with plenty of people my own sex and that is a reason that I like that the DDs go to a very small school. At that age the individual attention etc is important IMO - but that is just from my experience smile

hippo123 Wed 27-Feb-13 23:21:53

I would see how it's goes personally, especially as you like the school, you have other dc there and I presumed it's local to you. He can always do after school stuff like karate, beavers, football, rubgy etc where he is likely to meet other boys his age. I Would think at such a small school though he's would just play with boys the year above / below him.

educator123 Fri 01-Mar-13 12:36:22

Thank trekkie that is good to know...one of my worries of going bigger to classes of 25plus is that things/children get missed. Although it's a good school with good results/rep.

But I doubt it will have that same family feel about it.

The problem with seeing how it goes it that we run the risk of no choice as we may not be able to get them all in elsewhere and also that dd1 will be in year 4 by that point.

Dd2 is in reception and moving seems a big thing so would like to avoid that by ds starting where he will be most likely to be there for the duration.

It's tough too as dd1s best friend has moved to the other school so that combined with the sport they do she will be happy there, but I worry/feel it's unfair on dd2 has she has only just started to accept being at school so the transition could be a lot bigger for her.

I don't really want to be in the situation where I'm moving ds around when the girls have been at their current school for a long time!

pimmsgalore Fri 01-Mar-13 18:56:52

My DS was 1 bit with 5 girls when he started reception. He loved it, yr1 boys played with him at break and the classes were joined in the afternoon. We moved after yrR and the next school was bit heavy and he really missed the girls.

I would give it a go and see how he likes it. It made my boy feel special he also got on school council by default grin

pimmsgalore Fri 01-Mar-13 18:57:27

Bit = boy silly phone

educator123 Fri 01-Mar-13 19:27:45

Thanks glad he liked it smile Do you mind me asking why you moved him?

pimmsgalore Fri 01-Mar-13 22:12:28

we moved to the US for 2 years with DHs job, went to a busy town and he really missed his small rural primary and the girls in his class

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now