Oh dear, DD's KS1 teacher wrote "there" when meaning "they're". ..

(106 Posts)
JKB1 Fri 30-Nov-12 17:51:01

...and this was on a class assembly slide in front of the whole school plus the parents of the class. Is there any hope? You've got to laugh, then get on with the job of picking up the slack at home.

sdrumm41 Tue 04-Dec-12 21:21:05

Have you got absolutely nothing better to do than to post this on here. More than likely your DD's teacher was up until midnight doing stuff for that assembly for someone like you to come along and pick holes in it. You can bet your life he/she works 3 times as hard as you do and would probably be mortified at the error.

radicalsubstitution Mon 03-Dec-12 07:39:03

Oh bloody hell. Too much wine and not enough proof-reading.

Actually, the school belonged to the Roman Catholic church.

Oh well.

maizieD Sun 02-Dec-12 22:51:11

Ahem. Is that apostrophe needed in 'girl's independent school'?

Is it an independent school belonging to the girl? (or to your girl?)
Or is it an independent school belonging to the girls?
Or even, is it an independent school for girls?

And we're worrying about 'there' instead of 'they're'...wink

radicalsubstitution Sun 02-Dec-12 21:46:39

Is that where puerile comes from? I can't think of any other puer word in the radical mental dictionary.

alcofrolic Sun 02-Dec-12 21:44:29

Aaaah.... but can you decline 'puer'? Obviously much more useful than typing.

radicalsubstitution Sun 02-Dec-12 21:44:05

I was part of a small group at my girl's independent school who managed to convince the 'powers that be' that typing/word processing should be considered a 'DT' subject along with art/cookery/needlework/childcare.

It was very useful as a money-making skill for subsidising university.

Alas, I learned to 'word-process' on an Amstrad WPC. If Sugar thinks he's so damn clever, how does he explain that one?

TheNebulousBoojum Sun 02-Dec-12 21:37:20

Yes, when I was a gel, A stream did Latin, C stream did typing.
I can't type without peering at the keyboard.

alcofrolic Sun 02-Dec-12 21:35:25

<sips wine with satisfied slurp, in celebration of the fact that the 1975 Latin O level has, at last, been of use>

radicalsubstitution Sun 02-Dec-12 21:33:34

I once received a letter from DD's cardiologist. Before he retired, he was one of the most well-respected and well-loved paediatric cardiologists in the country. He has appeared on numerous episodes on the BBC following a well-known children's hospital in London.

One line of the letter read 'she is no medication'.

He probably trained as a doctor (and worked for much of his career) in a time when written communication was typed by secreataries. I used to spend my summer as a university student working as an office temp, and much of my time was spent typing relatively mundane communications but there would be only one PC per office.

Typos happen. They look really unprofessional, but most people accept that they happen from time to time.

If the teacher didn't understand the grammatical rules, then that's another matter entirely.

Incidentally, I was really pleased that the letter about my DD's heart surgery was actually written personally by her consultatnt and didn't come from a 'standard letter bank'. The typo proved that!

Feenie Sun 02-Dec-12 21:30:55

Probably just me, TNBoojum smile

Good pedant work there, alcofrolic. wink

TheNebulousBoojum Sun 02-Dec-12 21:30:01

grin

I stand corrected, someone does care!

alcofrolic Sun 02-Dec-12 21:28:26

The plural of curriculum vitae is curricula vitae (curriculum=course and curricula=courses; 'vitae' is genitive and means 'of life').

So really, shattered's sentence should have read 'I receive in excess of 3000 wannabe cv a year to read' if we want to get pedantic! grin

(....I assume? Any Latin scholars out there?!)

TheNebulousBoojum Sun 02-Dec-12 21:21:49

You are, of course, correct Feenie.
But who cares? smile

TheNebulousBoojum Sun 02-Dec-12 21:20:41

<Old crone enters hobbling, stage left>

'It's the 'what changed' bit I don't understand'

The demands of the curriculum changed. When I began, decades ago, the priorities were reading, writing and maths. How you taught it was entirely up to the teacher, there was no www or google, so the need was for a teacher with an excellent, established internalised understanding of what was being taught, and high level skills in those three areas.
We used to teach RWM in the mornings, and topic and PE in the afternoons.
The system had many faults, so they improved it. You are now living in the new, improved, upgraded version. As are your children.

<exit stage left, hobbling and cackling>

Feenie Sun 02-Dec-12 21:14:58

If you use the full Curriculum Vitaes then they can belong to someone. Hence the apostrophe.

Wtf? confused

There is no 'hence', Shattereddreams - it doesn't need one. Ever.

That's a generalisation btw

You're all so defensive.

I actually stated children's spelling was awful.
If you use the full Curriculum Vitaes then they can belong to someone. Hence the apostrophe.
As I already said, I have limited exposure to teachers. And then my exposure to MN where it seems lots of teachers struggle to spell SIMPLE words which is what I find hard to take.

My experience was Scrible? Really? Perhaps a long word, a difficult word or not follow the usual rule word. But a word my 5 year old can spell.

All of you teachers here, I bet you needed high A levels to study at Uni. I didn't get enough A level points to become a teacher 20 years ago.

It's the 'what changed' bit I don't understand.

teacherwith2kids Sun 02-Dec-12 20:50:15

Shattered,

Could you possibly point me to the (widely gathered, obviously) evidence that teachers' spelling is dreadful? I appreciate that you have evidence from CVs (plural, no apostrophe unless you are saying that something belongs to the CV, e.g. 'That CV's font is unreadable', though even that is a clumsy construction and 'The font in that CV is unreadable' would make your meaning clearer) that those young adults who apply to you either spell poorly or make frequent typing errors or use spellcheck indiscriminately.

As it happens, my teacher over 30 years ago couldn't spell - so by your logic, my spelling should be terrible ...

Feenie Sun 02-Dec-12 20:38:27

Really, maizieD? Can we call it clumsy then, do you think? It sounds awful.

CV's is most certainly not correct, Shattereddreams - plurals do not need apostrophes.

And CV's is also correct, it can have either as it happens, I use CVs but apple think they know better.

But it's chicken and egg. Which came first? Teachers who couldn't spell or today's children whose spelling is dreadful.

maizieD Sun 02-Dec-12 19:07:32

Can I whisper, very quietly Feenie dear, that the grammar of the first is correct but the punctuation isn't... (it should have commas round 'of all people')

Feenie Sun 02-Dec-12 18:16:54

grin

mrz Sun 02-Dec-12 18:05:07

by Wednesday I just want to sleep Feenie

Feenie Sun 02-Dec-12 18:00:04

The grammar of the first phrase and the punctuation in the second part.

maizieD Sun 02-Dec-12 17:41:53

Feenie,

Er, were you questioning the grammar or the punctuation?

Anybody...

When did 'any more' become one word? Was it at the same time as 'a lot'?

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