Would you, or do you allow your DC do things which might impact on their education?

(52 Posts)
wordfactory Thu 22-Nov-12 10:19:47

Just want to pick people's brains really.

DD (yr 9) has been asked to audition for a west end show. If she got the part it would mean quite a bit if time away from school and that worries me.

Does anyone else have DC who have done somehting like this or perhaps take part in sport or somehting else that has meant absences from school?

What do people think?

Does your DD want to continue in singing / theatre when she leaves school? Will the Theatre provide a tutor for her? If yes to both, I'd say go for it.

If she was Yr 11 and about to do GCSEs, then possibly not, but she's Yr 9 so go for it.

CecilyP Thu 22-Nov-12 10:28:40

Yes, I would go for it. Y9 is a bit of an odd year anyway. If she had started the GCSE syllabus, then it would be more of a problem.

wordfactory Thu 22-Nov-12 10:30:36

DD very much enjoys being in school productions etc. Whether she wants the life of an actress I don't know.

As for a tutor, I'm not sure. The trouble is they won't be able to bring in tutors for every subject will they?

I'm torn. On the one hand I think it would be a wonderful experience. On the other, I'm worried it will be too desruptive.

UC Thu 22-Nov-12 10:30:44

I would think DD must be really talented to be asked to do this. I would say yes, do it. I will be a wonderful experience. Is she interested in this as a career? Will she be doing home study during the time? Or tutoring or something? How much will she actually miss?

lisad123 Thu 22-Nov-12 10:31:02

I would and i would hire a tutor. I think legally there are some things you have to do.

ZZZenAgain Thu 22-Nov-12 10:31:35

my dd is a bit younger so I am not worried about exams yet but yes, I have taken her out of school to do things with music which seemed great opportunities such as travelling abroad with an orchestra and doing a stint at a conservatory on the youth programme for children - also abroad. She is still only 12 so it isn't that much of a problem yet. I don't let her do everything and I go on the advice of her music teacher/orchestra leaders. Soon I think I would curtail any of that unless she really wanted to proceed with music as a career which I am not sure she will want to do. I would worry that she might fall behind with schoolwork and I think she does enough music as it is really.

In your case, if your dd is really keen and she is coping well with school generally, I would let her audition. You still have time to think through the practicalities of it since you don't yet know if she will get the part. Good luck to her.

Bonsoir Thu 22-Nov-12 10:32:14

I think that if your DD is generally on top of school work that you could let her do this in Y9 and have (a) tutor(s) to ensure she doesn't fall behind. However, I suspect that all other extra-curricular activities would go by the wayside.

ZZZenAgain Thu 22-Nov-12 10:33:36

do you think the Head would be supportive?

Bonsoir Thu 22-Nov-12 10:34:33

We've taken DSS2 out of school at the end of the year regularly to send him to England to learn English. It doesn't seem to have made any difference at all to his school work in France. He's clever and able and school lets him take time off because of that. School would not have allowed this if he had been struggling.

Woozley Thu 22-Nov-12 10:34:56

I would, yes, if it was a great opportunity for them.

CecilyP Thu 22-Nov-12 10:35:22

There are also legal restrictions on how many nights a child can actually perform on stage, so it may be less disruptive than you think.

wordfactory Thu 22-Nov-12 10:41:11

DD has started her GCSE syllabus in science but that is all I think.
She is on top of her school work, but does put a lot of effort in already.

I think the head would be supportive, providing we paid our fees during any absences grin and kept up with all school work.

And yes, the other stuff would have to be put on hold - sport, choir etc.

mumnosbest Thu 22-Nov-12 10:44:29

Can you talk to her school? Would they be supportive? Discuss what she'll miss abd how she could keep up. Its a grwat opportunity.

mumnosbest Thu 22-Nov-12 10:44:48

*great

Blu Thu 22-Nov-12 11:00:08

Find out exactly what the rehearsal and performance schedule would be - there are strict rules about the amount of time children can be involved in shows. It may not be as much as you think. Then discuss it with the school.

I'd go for the audition, anyway!

izzyishavingababyAGAIN Thu 22-Nov-12 11:02:27

Yes I have and would - there is more to education than formal learning.

TalkinPeace2 Thu 22-Nov-12 11:14:31

DO IT

Regret what you have done, not what you have not
(Oscar Wilde)

CecilyP Thu 22-Nov-12 11:45:39

Yes, definitely do it - she will regret it if she doesn't. I'm feeling all stage-struck now.

mummytime Thu 22-Nov-12 12:20:27

My neighbour's son was a child actor (he demanded dancing lessons at 2 etc.), he had a great time. He still managed good GCSEs, although he had been filming until about a month before. He went to University and has a Masters. He now works in finance.

wordfactory Thu 22-Nov-12 12:34:42

I'm really pleased with these responses. It's making me feel much less worried grin.

ZZZenAgain Thu 22-Nov-12 13:40:02

I would see it as an overall learning experience, she will laarn so much generally being in that atmosphere. Learning for life as opposed to learning for an exam I suppose. I have given it some more thought and I think it is quite an exceptional opportunity your dd has there, so yes, I would let her try for it.

go for it.

but wont tney provide some sort of educaton whilst she is there? isnt that the norm?

BeckAndCall Thu 22-Nov-12 13:45:06

Absolutely go for it. The theatre will provide a tutor and there will be several casts to allow for the maximum hours an under 16 can rehearse and perform.

Good luck!

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