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Please help me stop worrying about DS2s operation

(8 Posts)

Thank you for thinking of me! It was fine, of course, as you all told me it would be. smile He was sitting up in bed asking for his advent calendar within an hour of coming round from the operation. It's too early to tell if his foot has been fixed for good but the op itself went without incident and he's back at home now. smile

unexpectediteminbaggingarea Tue 04-Dec-12 10:16:10

how did it go mackerel ?

I am feeling much more calm today thanks to this thread, I'm really grateful for your sympathy and experiences. smile

My DD has had a couple of GAs, first at 3 and a half and second for a follow up op a year later. I felt exactly the same as you, I think that it is totally normal to feel that way. The hospital staff made her feel fantastic and very important, and she was very excited walking into theatre and looking at all the interesting gadgets. They kept her so distracted that she didn't even notice them putting in the cannula as she was busy being shown something fascinating at the time! I still felt terrible though and there is no getting around the fact that it is not nice as you child passes out in your arms and is then lifted onto the operating table and you are told to leave. Prepare yourself a bit for that.

One thing I would tell you to watch out for is that they don't tend to call you to the recovery ward until the child is coming round so do check in advance how far away the ward is from the parents area, it took me longer than I had expected to get to the ward the first time and she was awake and screaming. Luckily she remembered absolutely nothing about that later on and all of her memories of the whole hospital experience are positive and happy, but it was pretty awful for me.

Second time around she went skipping back to the hospital and has no fear about the fact she will need to go back again next year (we were talking about it the other day and she is actually looking forward to it - I think secretly she loves all the attention).

Thanks both for your reassurances. I know there are children going through far worse and I am so grateful that were only dealing with a very minor problem with DS. In a strange way though that makes the op seem more, I don't know... like, because it's not essential, I kind of feel like it'll be my fault if something did happen.

One of my best friends is an operating department assistant so she's talked me through the process, but thank you Dew. It's not a terribly long operation (about 3 hours) so hopefully the wait won't be too bad. DP will be at the hospital with me.

I know I'm being daft and it'll all be fine. He'll be off his feet for a few weeks afterwards which will probably be the worst part for him!

DewDr0p Tue 27-Nov-12 17:12:33

Oh Mackerel I think it's totally normal to feel nervous of your little one having a GA. I was a nervous wreck when ds3 (then 4) had an op (also minor) last year. He also stayed overnight afterwards btw.

Actually the reality wasn't as bad as the anticipation. All the staff were really lovely, especially the anaesthetist, who was just fabulous with me. They all did really seem to understand that it's a big deal for you as a parent, even though it is totally bread and butter to them. Before I knew it, it was all over.

How long is the op going to take? Have you got someone to keep you company? I think I could have coped without but it was nice to have someone to wait with.

Has someone talked you through how it all works? If not and you think it would help, please say if you would like me to tell you how it worked for us.

unexpectediteminbaggingarea Tue 27-Nov-12 17:02:24

you're not being pfb at all, I would be just the same. I would expect someone sensible to talk me round too though, so here we are:

They will be giving him a tiny light dose of GA. Also, anaesthetists are the most cautious people I know (I am in healthcare and have spent lots of time in theatre) and as they are in charge of the patient's wellbeing they won't even dream of putting them under unless circumstances are pretty perfect, particularly for elective surgery. My DH was booked for elective surgery and after multiple anaesthetists had been in to worry about him during pre-op because he had a close relative who had a serious heart condition, they agreed it wasn't necessary enough and didn't do it.

They are keeping him overnight because he's 5 and he's had a ga so they are being cautious, and will want to make sure his pain is well managed, he's eating and sitting up happily.

If it was me I would make myself get some perspective by thinking about all the other reasons children are having surgery - scary, life threatening reasons. Your DSs is easy, bread and butter surgery.

He'll be fine.

This is really pathetic and PFB but please bear with me as it's making me feel a little weepy and ill. I can't even buy Christmas presents in case I tempt fate.

DS2 is five and having his first ever operation under general anaesthetic on Monday. He's had one previously under a local, and this operation is to correct a mistake that was made by the surgeon last time round - but for some reason this is terrifying me and I can't shake the feeling that he's not going to pull through.

The operation is only on his foot, it's nothing life-threatening at all, so even if they totally bodged it, he would be unlikely to die. He'll have to stay in overnight which makes the irrational part of me scream "that's because they think something might go wrong" but I know that's just standard.

Sensibly I know the benefits far outweigh the risks else they wouldn't be doing it, but I'm still so worried. I'm not usually like this. Can anyone offer some reassuring words?

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