Note: Mumsnetters don't necessarily have the qualifications or experience to help if your child is feeling seriously distressed or suicidal, and Mumsnet can't be held responsible for any advice given on the site. If you and/or your child need help urgently, please see our mental health webguide which can point you to expert advice and support.

Eating non food stuff

(2 Posts)
ilovespinach Sat 16-Feb-13 21:00:54

Ds is 6 well nearly 7 and we have a problem with him eating non food stuff - fluff from the floor, blu tack, cotton wool, wood etc He knows he shouldn't do it and when I ask him he says he doesn't know why. He is secretive with this and will hide things and then eat them on his own eg I found him on the way back to his bedroom from the toilet the other night. It was obvious he had something behind his back that he didn't want me to see. It turned out to be a wad of toliet paper he was going to eat in bed. he has also been locking the toilet door and I think eating the bathroom sponge.

He is also doing this in school. He is now not allowed to go into the play area and play with the wooden blocks. I saw them the other week and was shocked at waht he has done to them. To help learn letters etc they use clay and the teacher says she always has to have an eye on him as he will take the clay and hide it to eat later. We also had to replace a jacket just before Christmas as he had eaten half of the collar. Same with his pencils and rubbers - they come home eaten. I now use the money from his box for replacements and check everyday.

The school have recommended we get in touch with a child pscychologist (not in the uk so a differnt system).

I just don't know what to do. I feel incredibly sad that my son feels the need to do this.

Just wondering really of anyone else has any experience of this.

FWIW he has real issues with food so I find that he will eat any of the above stuff so frustrating. He's not hungry as he has enough to eat and is a good weight.

lljkk Sun 17-Feb-13 08:45:16

I would chat to child psychologist, that's the same advice you would get in UK. It's probably just an entrenched comfort habit, but he'll need something like CBT to break it. Good luck.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now