Join Rose Tremain to talk about TRESPASS - our Book of the Month - on Thur 20 Jan, 8pm

(96 Posts)

A date for your brand new diaries...

We've chosen TRESPASS by Rose Tremain as our January book of the month.

It's a thrilling novel about disputed territory, sibling love and devastating revenge, by the bestselling author of (amongst many others) The Road Home (winner of the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction) and Restoration (shortlisted for the Booker Prize).

We're really pleased that Rose can join us for our next book club discussion on Thurs 20 Jan at 8pm.

Read more about Trespass and Rose's other books, plus read an interview with Rose when Trespass was longlisted for the Booker...

Hope you can join us, should be a great discussion.

JohnPearceLadle Thu 20-Jan-11 20:34:42

sorry for the accidental affected "O"

RoseTremain Thu 20-Jan-11 20:35:41

atrociouscook

A fabulous book, full of suspense. .did the car get burnt in the fire? why didn't the police investigate the remains? What a horrible collection of characters - all so ugly, except perhaps for Veronica but beautifully drawn. Can't wait for your next book.

Interesting that you found the characters 'horrible'. To me, of course, they wren't that at all, but just flawed and trying to come to terms with the last bit of their lives. So I tried to treat them with compassion.

As to the car, this would have been taken away by the police long before the fire arrives. And the remains: I don't give you this scene, but by these would have been investigated after Veronica idnetifies the body.

HelenMumsnet (MNHQ) Thu 20-Jan-11 20:37:25

Hello Rose. Can I talk to you about the silkworms? Were they what got you started with this book - or did they come into your thinking later?

It's just that I loved all that stuff about them gobbling voraciously, unseen, in the attics, growing and growing - until, in the end, they were boiled alive. Very much like the characters in the book, many of whom had secrets/hurts gnawing away unseen that, eventually, turned out to be their undoing.

<overanalysing, probably>

sophable Thu 20-Jan-11 20:38:47

I am so sad for you that those books were lost. tragic.

Really looking forward to reading Trespass, I have a book club with some very good women friends, and I also do a sort of 'book club' with my husband where we take turns choosing the book and then go out for dinner and spend some of the time discussing it.

Given that the remit for my book club with my husband is that we extend each other's reading range, and that we both adore your work, I don't think that Trespass will make it to our club!

Thanks again, and for replying.

OliviaMumsnet (MNHQ) Thu 20-Jan-11 20:39:54

Okay, have steeled myself and apologies in advance for sycophantic tone but I have loved all the books of yours that I have read and devoured them voraciously and paid little attention to those around me whilst reading them. grin

I am thrilled to discover today that there are some I haven't read and that it's to be a sequel to Merivel who I think is my favourite of all of your characters, though having worked for an auction house in a former life, I did LOVE Anthony too.

Question s:
What is the best thing about being a writer?
And the worst?

JosieMumsnet (MNHQ) Thu 20-Jan-11 20:40:11

Making my first 'proper' appearance on mumsnet to join this discussion! (though a bit late blush)
Hello Rose,
Really enjoyed Trespass and The Road Home - I feel like I've really lived through the books, they're so evocative of people and places. Really want to go to France now! I particularly liked the tender moment with the teacher and Melodie at the end of Trespass. Amazing sense of death/the unknown threatening the whole time, through the first scene, Kitty, Anthony, Audrun.
I wanted to know more about how you knew so much about the Cevennes, did you grow up there or just visit a lot? Was there a bit of yourself in Melodie - are you a city dweller out of your comfort zone there or is it a liberating escape?
Looking forward to reading more of your books!

JosieMumsnet (MNHQ) Thu 20-Jan-11 20:40:54

<MNHQ hogs thread>

RoseTremain Thu 20-Jan-11 20:41:24

atrociouscook

iT BECAME A BIT OF A DETECTIVE STORY TOWARDS THE END \I THINKand when I realised this I started to look for clues so kinda knew that it was going to be the little girl who would find Anthony. Did you mean it to be a bit of a thriller in this way

I think it's 'a bit of a detective story' right from the get-go, isn't it? Surely the scream uttered by Melodie echoes right through the book, long before we 'see' the crime. But yes, I wanted this atmosphere of terror to be present at the beginning and then to grow and grow. But of course the plotting got very very complicated and actually made me ill for a while!

Guacamole Thu 20-Jan-11 20:41:44

Thank you Rose, very excited that you're allowing us into your room. I am very nosey!

gailforce1 Thu 20-Jan-11 20:45:38

I enjoyed Trespass and am now looking forward to Restoration.

The bathing suit incident was poignant but by the then I had despaired of Lal as a Mother!

RoseTremain Thu 20-Jan-11 20:49:27

JosieMumsnet

Making my first 'proper' appearance on mumsnet to join this discussion! (though a bit late blush)
Hello Rose,
Really enjoyed Trespass and The Road Home - I feel like I've really lived through the books, they're so evocative of people and places. Really want to go to France now! I particularly liked the tender moment with the teacher and Melodie at the end of Trespass. Amazing sense of death/the unknown threatening the whole time, through the first scene, Kitty, Anthony, Audrun.
I wanted to know more about how you knew so much about the Cevennes, did you grow up there or just visit a lot? Was there a bit of yourself in Melodie - are you a city dweller out of your comfort zone there or is it a liberating escape?
Looking forward to reading more of your books!

Hope you get to France and enjoy and don't get lost in the high corniches of the Cevennes! I've known the region for a long while. On my second honeymoon, our car was broken into where we'd parked on a high mountain road and all our things taken - including such small bits of jewellery as I owned at the time including my engagement ring. So from then on, the Cevennes has always had a kind fo sinister unertone in my consciousness. Thus, it struck me as a very fruitful place in which to set a tense story.

I think there is a little bit of myself in Melodie. When I was ten my parents divorced and we went to live in the country. I'd been very happy in London at my school and with lots of friends and then I lost them all and lost my father at one go. But of course kids adjust in the end. I think Melodie, helped by Jeanne, will be OK in time.

atrociouscook Thu 20-Jan-11 20:52:04

Yes it was tense all the way through but became even more exciting when i realisd it was going to be a whodunnit (one of my fave genres). So sorry you were ill but can understand - I found the tnsion sometimes almost unbearable -surely a sign of a great novel - thank you so much.

RoseTremain Thu 20-Jan-11 20:53:12

Elly68

Rose - love the book and couldn't put it down. One question though. As a writer you take from your own past experiences ie Lal was similar to your own mother. The bathing suit story you refer to. Do you ever feel exposed to bring in real life experiences as you may not want your readers to know such personal things about you.

Good question. But it's very very rare for me to use my own biography at all, so questions of exposure don't really come up. With the bathing suit thing, I began to write the scene differently, but then it occurred to me that the 'real' thing had so muhc more power in my mind that I decided to use it. (However, if my mother had still been alive, I woulnd't have used it. People say 'Beware a writer in the family!" and they'd right to be afraid.

RoseTremain Thu 20-Jan-11 20:57:50

TillyBookClub

Evening everyone

I'm absolutely thrilled to introduce Rose Tremain as tonight's Author of the Month. Rose's books have featured heavily in Mumsnet 'top favourite' threads, and I'm delighted that we have the chance to ask a few questions.

So without further ado...

Rose, thank you very much indeed for taking time to talk to us. Perhaps we could kick off with the advance questions from further up the thread? And then we'll aim to get through as many as possible over the next hour.

And here are my two standard Mumsnet Bookclub ones:

Which childhood book most inspired you?

What would be your first piece of advice for anyone attempting to write fiction?

Calypso

Hi Rose, I read 'The Way I Found You' years ago and loved it and then just finished Trespass. You have a remarkable capacity to get into the mind of characters of such diverse age groups - young boys and girls through to old men. Do you do much research into your characters, are they based on people/relationships you know?

I think my characters are a strange amalgam of people I know and pure invention. But you know, far from being afraid of seeing themselves in books, many people rather hope to be immortalised in fiction!

RoseTremain Thu 20-Jan-11 21:02:45

OliviaMumsnet

Okay, have steeled myself and apologies in advance for sycophantic tone but I have loved all the books of yours that I have read and devoured them voraciously and paid little attention to those around me whilst reading them. grin

I am thrilled to discover today that there are some I haven't read and that it's to be a sequel to Merivel who I think is my favourite of all of your characters, though having worked for an auction house in a former life, I did LOVE Anthony too.

Question s:
What is the best thing about being a writer?
And the worst?

The worst is worrying that your life as a writer is about to come to a terrifying end because you run out of ideas! But the best is everything, really. The ability that writers have to live their lives twice over, once in real time and once in fictional time.
And with so many paople feeling gently bored by their lives, I realise that I'm rather lucky, because when I'm working, I'm never bored. I may be angry with myself that the work isn't going better, but I'm always consoled by the fact that I'm doing work I feel passionate about.

I'm afraid that's all we've got time for tonight - many apologies if you haven't had your question answered.

Rose, many many thanks for answering so many questions and spending an evening with us all. It has been a complete honour to have you, and so illuminating to get the insider knowledge...

Restoration has always been the book I evangelise most about and press onto anyone I can - I'm deeply excited that you are writing a sequel and cannot wait to read it.

Please do come back and talk to us about it when it is published...

Many thanks again.

Elly68 Thu 20-Jan-11 21:06:27

Rose - thanks for your answer.

One more question not directly related to Trespass.

It's said that being a writer requires enormous self discipline. How do you manage to drag up enthusiasm and mental creativity to write, when you're going through a period that just doesn't seem to be 'flowing'?

RoseTremain Thu 20-Jan-11 21:07:59

Sorry we've run out of time. I've really enjoyed answering the questions and apologies to those whose questions I didn't get to.

If any of you live in London, I'll be talking about Trespass on 7th May at Foyles.
Love to see you there!

Nighty night....

And for anyone who'd like to keep on chatting about TRESPASS over the next few days/weeks, we've started a brand new post-webchat discussion thread - see you there...

FunnysInTheGarden Thu 20-Jan-11 22:57:44

Oh Curses, RT didn't answer my question. Am really looking forward to Restoration II though. Twas Restoration which got me hooked to start with.

MayorNaze Fri 21-Jan-11 07:41:51

SO sory didn't make it - RL circumstances beyond my control angry

will whizz through now...

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