On the subject of Marianne - question for francophones

(14 Posts)
eryan Thu 04-Oct-12 22:24:23

Interesting to read the other thread on Marianne, as it's one we're considering. DH is French speaking and it works well in both languages. I am aware of the associations in English, but was wondering about French. Is it so inextricably linked to the embodiment of the French Republic, that that is what immediately comes to mind? Would it seem an odd choice for a baby in view of this strong association? Are there any other connotations? I notice it is given very rarely in France. Thanks for any insights.

shoppingtrolley Fri 05-Oct-12 10:19:15

Good question - I'd like to know too!

javotte Fri 05-Oct-12 11:56:19

Native French speaking. People here would think of the Republic, but also Maid Marian in Robin Hood. It is quite rare in France ATM but not odd or negative. I have met 2 so far (one in her 40s, one in her 20s) and I wouldn't find it strange on a baby. For me it is a timeless name - it cannot become dated.

Pasiphae Fri 05-Oct-12 13:11:42

I'm French and yes I think of the Republican figure straight away.
And the political magazine called Marianne too.

Saying that, it's totally faisible/usable. I had a friend called Marianne at school, and it was never a problem. On the contrary, she received quite a lot of compliment on her unusual name.
I agree it's timeless, it would not be out of place on a baby or a grand mother.

I think I would prefer Marianna, like Marianne but less obviously republican...

DialMforMummy Fri 05-Oct-12 13:39:42

Not an odd choice at all. A strong association would be my cousins. Two of them are called Marianne. You have my consent wink

ImpYCelyn Fri 05-Oct-12 19:07:45

It is inextricably linked, and that comes straight to mind (as does the magazine) but I'm not sure that's a bad thing. Also Maid Marian, who is Marianne in French.

But most names are strongly linked to something or other, and people use them anyway. We love Héloïse for a future DD, even I can't hear the name without thinking "Abélard", but to me it's a nice name regardless.

Same with Marianne, I think it's a lovely name so would use it. DH however vetoed it because of the Republic. But if you're both happy with it then use it.

How would you feel about Annemarie? I like it less though

eryan Fri 05-Oct-12 19:58:10

Thanks all. That is very helpful. Sounds like it would be fine despite the associations. Thanks for the suggestions of Marianna and Annemarie, still prefer Marianne though!

SoozleQ Sat 06-Oct-12 00:23:50

What about Arianne? Sounds lovely still bit not the same connotation.

ImpYCelyn Sat 06-Oct-12 15:38:00

Arianne is lovely! Or Orianne? Eliane?

Or (bit of a tangent) Aliénor?

NadiaWadia Sat 06-Oct-12 18:41:40

I thought it was spelled Mariane in France? (one 'n')?

Or have I got that mixed up?

ulissey Sun 07-Oct-12 21:39:15

My 20 year old daughter is Ariane. It is quite common in Quebec, but not so much so in France, she is usually the only one around. She does get called Marianne at times, which is a little less "sophisticated" ( it does suit the spinterish librarian in my school), and takes a double "n". There are quite a few Orianne, Auriane, and Oriana amongst her friends. The trouble is they can't relate to models such as the Greek Ariadne, and none ever knows how to spell it. They sound a little like contrived efforts to be original to me . Ariane did not like her own name for a long time because of the European satellite launcher. It verges on the intellectual side , judging from the few I met.
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ditzydrawers Mon 08-Oct-12 09:54:44

Marianne rocks. In any language. I am possibly biased as my DD is one.

eryan Mon 08-Oct-12 22:13:32

Thanks for all the advice and suggestions. Still like Marianne the best though.

ditzydrawers Wed 10-Oct-12 22:43:07

It's gorgeous! Good luck with your DD.

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