Note: Please bear in mind that whilst this topic does canvass opinions, it is not a fight club. You may disagree with other posters but we do ask you please to stick to our Talk Guidelines and to be civil. We don't allow personal attacks or troll-hunting. Do please report any. Thanks, MNHQ.

Both schools and nursery fucking closed because of 2 inches of fucking snow!

(72 Posts)
SickOfBeingSoScared Wed 05-Dec-12 10:49:50

EXCUSE MY LANGUAGE. I am ranting!!

Neither school informed parents until after 8.15am when I had already left home early to get there on time. Therefore I wasted over an hour and a half as the traffic was ridiculous, we are talking moving at 3mph ffs. What is wrong with people that they cannot drive in a bit of slush!??

It snowed between 5.00 and 6.00am (I was up with DS3 watching it [anger]) not icy just slush. Has not snowed since and it immediately started thawing. The school no more than half a mile away from the DSs is open as usual hmm.

Been told by DS3's nursery which he attends 3 afternoons a week and which I scrape the money together for, that they are only open to 'working parents' as they don't have enough staff and parents who get the funded hours or who are not going to work cannot take their DC in but I still have to pay for the session anyway! They can fuck right off! Again the nursery less than a mile away from that one is fully open!

AIBU to think the staff probably can't be arsed to go in and I should not have to pay for that?

Really fuming as I had an important appointment this afternoon which I now have to cancel!!

OutragedAtThePriceOfFreddos Wed 05-Dec-12 11:59:25

If they haven't got the staff then I think it would be fine for them to appeal to parents to keep children at home if hey possibly can, or at least bring them in later in the day. But they can't tell parents that their custom only matters if they are going to do paid work.

RooneyMara Wed 05-Dec-12 12:04:26

Wonky I disagree unless you mean, have a vehicle suitable for the conditions.

I drove very very carefully this morning - someone else's child in my car, too - and we made it, just, but the wheels kept spinning on the more covered roads and when we got to the car park, the brakes failed.

I'm not sure how exactly I could have made this not happen! (tell me if there is a technique)

I was doing about 5mph thank God and we did stop but it was frightening

SickOfBeingSoScared Wed 05-Dec-12 12:05:29

Just spoke to nursery again and they said if I take him, they will turn us away but will still have to pay! They will also be closing early anyway due to the dangerous roads - err, snow has stopped and is melting! No more is forecast today.

Am I really being UR? They seem to think I am!

SickOfBeingSoScared Wed 05-Dec-12 12:09:44

Other people in the area have been flabbergasted (like me) of the traffic chaos this morning due to a little bit of snow. The roads were wet but clear on the way back from the failed school drop off but people were still driving at 3mph!

RooneyMara Wed 05-Dec-12 12:11:29

They probably were driving at the speed they judged as safe. Would you rather they went faster even if it meant they felt out of control of their car?

btw yanbu if the nursery still insist you pay - they're out of order.

Aboutlastnight Wed 05-Dec-12 12:12:58

We had snow three days ago in Scotkand and everything just went on as usual.
Would be very angry if school closed due to three inches of snow.

CelineMcBean Wed 05-Dec-12 12:16:09

They cannot turn you away and expect to be paid - that is extremely unreasonable.

You have a contract whereby they provide a service and you pay them. No service where they have declined to provide the service is a breach of the contract and you should not have to pay.

I would not discuss it with them. I would tell them calmly (and backed up in writing) that you will NOT be paying for the time they declined to provide the service to you because you are not working and that if they want paying for the time they can take you to court... but that if they do that you will make a counter action for indirect sex discrimination as per the Equality Act 2010.

<<It could be argued as indirect sex discrimination because more women then men are non-working parents. Not that you'd bother actually taking that further but you'd just let them know you could.>>

wonkylegs Wed 05-Dec-12 13:31:35

Rooney there is a bit of a knack to driving in snow and some cars are better than others - BMWs are abysmal as they are rear wheel drive but my little toyota Yaris is fab (small wheels, light car) and our big Audi is ok.
The first year I drove on snow I was terrified but the more you do it the better you get at it (side effect of living in Newcastle is that over the years we've had a fair amount of it)
There are some tips on how to drive in snow here:
news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8443690.stm

ENormaSnob Wed 05-Dec-12 14:21:58

The nursery issue is farcical.

I would be furious.

I'm pretty certain that we have to pay for snow days at our nursery and they do then pay the staff. However I wouldn't be happy to pay for a day where they decided which children they would take - Celine McBean's response is spot on.

LemonBreeland Wed 05-Dec-12 14:41:37

The nursery are unbelievable to tell someone that their child cannot come to nursery but they must still pay. How do they think they can get away with that? Definitely put it in writing.

moonstorm Wed 05-Dec-12 14:49:18

Why can't people drive in the snow? Because they are driving on summer tyres. Winter tyres should be made the law.

YABU to judge others (YANBU about the nursery unless they are understaffed and taking in all children would have safety issues for the children).

You don't know what the weather is like where the teachers work. I drive 20 miles to work - my place of work has much worse weather that at home due to the way the land lies. Anyone travelling in the opposite direction to me might just stay at home. I am often allowed to leave early in bad weather.

I wouldn't pay the nursery for the days they were open but turned you away.

RooneyMara Wed 05-Dec-12 16:32:53

Thanks for the link, Wonky...I already do the things on their list but it's good to know I'm getting it right!

We do have summer tyres, the thing is, it barely ever snows here, so is it worth making winter tyres the law?

I think this is the problem - we're just not really set up for these sort of conditions, while other countries such as Sweden etc are better prepared because they have so much snow and have no choice.

healstorturepeople Wed 05-Dec-12 16:57:33

I taught for nearly a decade and only had 1 day where my school was closed for snow.
I remember one day very clearly. I was driving to school in horrible conditions. I was only going about 25-30 mph, the same as everyone on the duel carriageway when I suddenly skidded to the other side of the road. I hit the barrier and a car ran into the back of me. I wasn't hurt as the speeds were slow but I was shocked and in tears. I got to school and had to teach the day as normal. I was shaking and teary for most of the morning. Many teachers were coming from much further and more rural locations than me. They had horrendous journeys. Later that day a child slipped moving between our two buildings and broke his ankle.

Schools close for numerous reasons. Primarily because of safety for the children and for staff. Schools now have more concerns about parents putting in a claim if their child hurts themselves on schools property. It is also more difficult for school dinners to arrive if they are externally provided. The heating in schools is often old and tends to pack up at the slightest of cold temperatures. There is rarely money to change the whole heating system so repairs work temporarily but not forever. If some staff can't make it then the numbers of children for each teacher becomes unworkable and no work would get done anyway. Also believe it or not we get parents who moan that the school isn't closed as well as those who moan because it is. No school can win! Some parents want their children safe at home in these kind of conditions, I can understand that. A lot of parents work and finding care at short notice is difficult, I can understand that too. A decision to close isn't made lightly. It is also often made by the headteacher who may or may not live anywhere near the school so analysing the local road conditions and school premises at 7am in the morning may not be possible for him/her.

Please don't play the 'lazy' school card. All the teachers I know (and I know lots!) are extremely dedicated and will try to get into school if at all possible. One teacher I knew drove 3.5 hours there and 3.5 hours back every day for a week in the snow (normal journey time just over an hour but the road conditions meant a much longer journey). Another teacher paid for local b&b for 2 weeks as she lived on rural roads 50 minutes away and would have been unable to get into school.

dribbleface Wed 05-Dec-12 17:01:15

Not sure about your nursery staff being too lazy to bother hmm but all mine got in, albeit late. We didn't open until 9 am rather than 7.30 am. Took staff on average 2.5 hours to get here.

All my staff bar 1 come from a far distance, quality staff are hard to get!

SomeTiggyPudding Wed 05-Dec-12 17:28:18

"Been told by DS3's nursery...
..don't have enough staff...
...They can fuck right off! Again the nursery less than a mile away from that one is fully open!

AIBU to think the staff probably can't be arsed to go in and I should not have to pay for that?"

The nursery should not charge you. They surely can't legally charge you. If they can't provide the service they can't charge for it.

The whole staff not getting in while parents can is a thing that crops up quite often in nurseries. To put it in a way you'll understand: Parents with their fucking 4x4 off road trucks can get in fine but the staff getting £2.65 an hour for trainees and motherfucking minimum wage for qualified staff have to cunting well drive felching Micras or arse fisting well take buses or rely on spacedocking lifts!

ChristmasIsForPlutocrats Wed 05-Dec-12 18:38:22

* have to cunting well drive felching Micras or arse fisting well take buses or rely on spacedocking lifts!*

grin

On a more serious note, OP, why not try reposting this in Legal, to give you some background before tomorrow?

moonstorm Wed 05-Dec-12 22:31:34

Winter tyres are not just for the snow.

The composistion of the rubber is different and they perform better when the temperature is under about 7 degrees. Summer tyres go hard in cold weather, winter tyres remain 'softer'.

They perform better on cold weather and in the wet and on ice.

It's not just about snow. (But if it were, I would still argue for them for safety on those few occasions - I can't remember when it hasn't snowed at some point.)

RooneyMara Thu 06-Dec-12 06:03:43

Oh Ok - that makes sense then. I had no idea - thanks for explaining. (don't think we could afford them though!)

Sirzy Thu 06-Dec-12 06:55:50

Nowhere should need to close because of 2 inches of snow. It is madness how the country grinds to a halt at the first sign of a snowflake.

CouthyMowEatingBraiiiiinz Thu 06-Dec-12 07:12:07

Yesterday I got my DC's to school, albeit 20 minutes late (traffic was at a crawl here and there was only 1/2 an inch of snow, I mean WTF?!)

There were teachers arriving after us!

Scotland carries on with 6+ inches of snow, why can't the SE cope with a slight dusting?

If my DS2 and me didn't have disabilities that made the walk impossible, we could have walked quicker. Most people did!

One teacher was on the bus with us, and had left her house at 7am and was still 20 minutes late.

ceeveebee Thu 06-Dec-12 07:32:11

What I don't really understand is why schools and nurseries close when it snows, but all the offices, shops, restauants and factories manage to stay open. Everyone else manages to get to work somehow but not teachers or nursery assistants.

jamdonut Thu 06-Dec-12 07:51:46

shops dont have to fulfill ratios of adults to children. 3 or 4 members of staff not making it in can make it unsafe to operate.

Our school is by the sea, and sometimes we hardly have any snow, but the majority of our staff live inland in rural areas and snowfall is usuall far heavier and makes roads impossible to pass. It causes panic if snow starts during a school day, because a lot of staff are worried if they are actually gooing to get home to their families. Me...I live a 15 minute walk away from school ,so it doesn't affect me.

Schools have to make last minute decisions to close,depending on whether they feel it is safe . I always look on-line at the schools web-site,or council web-site or twitter to see if my own children's school is closing. (Yes, they have a Twitter account!)

jamdonut Thu 06-Dec-12 07:53:56

By the way...your nursery has chosen not to provide you with a service, therefore, they should not be charging you. That is shocking.

TheDoctrineOfSnatch Thu 06-Dec-12 07:59:53

Nursery can charge if it is in their t&c's.

They almost certainly have some but not all staff so can't meet ratios if all children come. All parents at my daycare work so they give priority to children of key workers eg nurses

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now