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A parent's guide to paying children for chores

Wondering what the current going rate for pocket money is, or what chores you can reasonably expect in return? Nationwide asked Mumsnetters to reveal how chores and pocket money work in their homes

1. Start 'em young

1. Start 'em young

“My daughter is three. She earns £1 a week for helping to clear the table every night after dinner. She likes to put it in her piggy bank. Right now she is saving it up 'for a giant ice cream'.”

2. But not SO young they don't quite get it

2. But not SO young they don't quite get it

“My son is five and just doesn't care about money. He wanted chocolate from the tooth fairy when he lost his first tooth.”

3. Talking of chocolate...

3. Talking of chocolate...

“I got our son to understand the value of money by getting him to work out which chocolate was the best value. He worked out how much each cost per 100g – he was amazed at the differences in price.”

4. Put it into terms they can grasp

4. Put it into terms they can grasp

“I demonstrate how many hours/days pay we have to spend in order to buy something or go out for a meal. That way our son knows we work hard for our money. He then appreciates and respects the money he is given, and helps out, unasked, at home.”

5. Explain that there are no free rides

5. Explain that there are no free rides

“Mine don't have 'pocket money' only 'job money' as I don't want my children to grow up thinking it's OK to get money for doing nothing.”

6. And that everyone has a role to play

6. And that everyone has a role to play

“I have explained that everything we have is because I work for the water in the tap and to put the shoes on their feet. Their job is school.”

7. Equate pocket money with wages

7. Equate pocket money with wages

“I give them a minimum each week (which I compare to a basic wage). They can earn extra pocket money through housework, a good school report or general good deeds over and above normal behaviour (which I compare to overtime and bonuses).”

8. And teach that actions have consequences

8. And teach that actions have consequences

“My daughter is a real spendthrift. I have tried giving her chores in return for pocket money with little success. I am now switching to a 'when it's gone, it's gone' allowance.”

9. Spread the love of saving

9. Spread the love of saving

“I used to love my savings paying-in book as a kid and found it exciting to see the money going up. I want my son to have that same feeling.”

10. And of sharing

10. And of sharing

“We also talk about spend versus save versus share (charity).”

11. Incentivise weekly chores

11. Incentivise weekly chores

“We have a chore board. Attached to each chore there is a money bag with cash waiting upon completion for example, making bed (50p), loading washing machine (£1). They can only take the money when the chore is done and not before.”

12. And, if you're REALLY lucky, you'll be inspired

12. And, if you're REALLY lucky, you'll be inspired

“I racked my brains about how to encourage my daughter to earn pocket money and I hit on a great idea. She looks after me! I do the housework but I give her money to pamper me. She brushes my hair, massages my head and shoulders and feet and makes me cups of tea!”

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