How to get minerals and vitamins into your child's diet

Dad and child with healthy food choices

When it comes to getting all the necessary minerals and vitamins into your child's diet, thing's don't need to be tricky. You can find all the good stuff they need to grow strong and healthy in food products such as milk, but milk’s goodness and nutrients can be damaged by both natural and artificial light.

Luckily, Noluma are experts in testing light damage in packaging to ensure that all the nutrients and goodness are kept preserved and stay unaffected. Noluma have asked Mumsnet users to share the subtle and inventive ways they get vitamins and minerals into their little ones with minimum fuss.

Empower and educate

Empower and educate

Who hasn’t tried to sneak grated carrot or blitzed broccoli onto the plate of a toddler who says they don’t like vegetables? It’s entirely understandable that you’d adopt this approach out of desperation but some Mumsnet users believe you shouldn’t disguise healthy food and should instead let your children know early on what’s good for them.

“I don't like 'hiding' anything in their food because I want them to be aware of the need for variety, so that they can make smart choices.”

Make it fun

Make it fun

Healthy eating needn’t be a chore. Apart from its undoubted goodness, fruit is sweet and vibrantly coloured, so works well mixed in with a treat (especially if you follow the advice below) and there are even recipes that will make veg taste amazing to your kids.

“If we are watching a film I will make bowls with popcorn, orange segments and blueberries. A few more vitamins than plain popcorn and delicious.”

Insist on balance

Insist on balance

If children are to feel good, develop healthy habits and grow in body and mind, then it’s essential they get a mix of protein, fruit and veg, dairy and carbohydrates. That means getting five fruit and veg into almost every meal, as well as basing them on higher fibre starchy foods (potatoes, bread, rice, pasta), some beans, pulses, fish, eggs and lean meat.

“My children have lots of fruit and veg (at least five a day), wholegrain, dairy, lean white meat, fish and nuts.”

Give them multivitamins that taste like sweets

Give them multivitamins that taste like sweets

Guidelines state that children aged six months to five years should be given vitamins A, C and D supplements. Which would be a drag, except that gone are the days when swallowing multivitamin tablets was akin to forcing down a travel sickness pill. Some of the multivitamin options – eg chewable fruit vitamins – on the market today are so tasty you’ll probably need to place them out of reach to stop your kids taking more than their one a day.

“I give my 18-month-old vitamin drops. He likes the taste so there’s no battle and I found a brand that didn't use sugar so that was a bonus!”

Let them eat cake (made from eggs)

Let them eat cake (made from eggs)

Eggs contain iron, protein, fat, vitamins A, D, E, B12, and choline – all vital for a growing child. And, as the Mumsnet user below points out, you can serve them in an endless variety of ways (eggy bread, anyone?)

“Protein, iron, Vitamin D and B12 – everyone likes eggs and there are so many fab ways to eat them – poached, soft boiled, fried, scrambled, omelettes, hard boiled in a salad, whisked into a flan filling.”

For information about how you can encourage supermarkets to stock your favourite milk brand in light-protected packaging visit www.lightdamageisreal.com.