New colleague competency

(13 Posts)
HouseofWindsor Mon 08-Mar-21 20:01:35

New colleague of 6 months. We're still working remotely so induction and getting then used to working practices is not as easy as it should.

There is an administrative task that has to be carried out and needs sign off by a senior manager. The new colleague has been talked through this task a number of times. On one occasion she nearly sent the letter to the client without sign off which I managed to intercept in time. I then talked her through the consequences of what could have happened. I helped her draw up a flowchart as a checklist to help her with some tasks.

A similar situation has arisen where sign off is required. I have a sense that she is going to go ahead without senior management sign off. I am of a mind to just let her get on with it let her deal with the consequences.

Is that mean ?

OP’s posts: |
Lou573 Mon 08-Mar-21 20:02:42

Of course it’s mean!

StealthPolarBear Mon 08-Mar-21 20:03:46

Maybe a 'have you checked the flowchart?'

Xiaoxiong Mon 08-Mar-21 20:11:05

Did you train this colleague or are you managing her? Just a simple "don't forget the flowchart" would be appropriate I think, if you know she's carrying out that task. It would be mean not to catch it, and you might be in trouble yourself anyway if you knew it was going wrong and did nothing to stop it.

HouseofWindsor Mon 08-Mar-21 20:37:00

Yes. A quick have you checked the flowchart. But how long do you keep reminding a colleague when it's part of their work ?

Probably a bit tense about it as I have tried to help her. She often sends me drafts of work to look over before she sends to her line manager. I am often making amendments sadly.

I'll also talk to her line manager.

OP’s posts: |
Snowball70 Mon 08-Mar-21 20:54:04

StealthPolarBear

Maybe a 'have you checked the flowchart?'


This is a good idea 🌺

Xiaoxiong Tue 09-Mar-21 09:36:40

Ah if you're not her line manager, then definitely have a word with them. You're basically managing sideways at the moment - looking over her work, making a flow chart, etc. That's nice and helpful to the organisation as a whole, but not your job and you won't get paid, thanked or promoted for it.

You're being the glue right now. Don't be the glue!! (See here: noidea.dog/glue)

redswinger Tue 09-Mar-21 22:53:22

Xiaoxiong

Ah if you're not her line manager, then definitely have a word with them. You're basically managing sideways at the moment - looking over her work, making a flow chart, etc. That's nice and helpful to the organisation as a whole, but not your job and you won't get paid, thanked or promoted for it.

You're being the glue right now. Don't be the glue!! (See here: noidea.dog/glue)

Just what you don’t want in your team - someone who won’t do something unless they can see a clear benefit for themselves.

Aprilx Wed 10-Mar-21 09:29:02

I think the downside to widespread working at home is that it will become harder for new entrants to the organisation to get up to speed with processes. So personally I would be kind and patient.

As an aside, I think to knowingly allow an error to happen than potentially impacts a client, would be unprofessional.

Xiaoxiong Wed 10-Mar-21 09:41:25

redswinger if OP keeps sorting out the problems and reviewing colleague's work so it doesn't go to clients and the line manager is unaware, then if the colleague needs more training, more support, or whatever the OP can't give her those things. Only the line manager can. She needs to have a word with the line manager and say "just so you know, I'm repeatedly catching these balls before they drop and I think colleague needs more support."

First few weeks - fine to help someone new on your team finding their feet. Six months on - line manager needs to step in and do their job to give this colleague the support they need.

Doingitaloneandproud Wed 10-Mar-21 09:42:15

I would talk to the line manager, just explain and they should hopefully give the employee some help/more training if required. It must be hard starting a new job virtually, but you can't keep overseeing things if it isn't your role and you have your own work to do.
I wouldn't let something go to the client though if it's meant to go to a senior staff member first, it will look unprofessional on the company as a whole.

redswinger Wed 10-Mar-21 11:30:38

Aprilx

I think the downside to widespread working at home is that it will become harder for new entrants to the organisation to get up to speed with processes. So personally I would be kind and patient.

As an aside, I think to knowingly allow an error to happen than potentially impacts a client, would be unprofessional.

I think that is definitely what we have noticed and we all chip in to support our new team members...our job is to ensure the client gets an excellent service from us - we pull together and we get stuff done - "that's not my job!" is not how we work, thankfully!

GrumpyHoonMain Wed 10-Mar-21 11:33:19

She probably isn’t as engaged due to starting remotely. Does she get regular team meetings? Do you often have social calls just to catch up?

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