Nursing to Teaching

(65 Posts)
Doobydoo Sun 27-Dec-20 13:41:20

Heloo. Just after some insider info. Been looking at teaching courses and just wondered if a Diploma in Nursing ( I am a Paediatric Nurse) and NVQ 5 in Leadership and Management is enough to enable me to train as a teacher ( prob 4-7 year olds)

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Doobydoo Sun 27-Dec-20 13:44:59

Although I have been working with Elderly frail for the last 6 years as a nurse.

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Orf1abc Sun 27-Dec-20 13:53:11

You'd need a degree for postgraduate entry.

This is not insider info, a Google search will tell you about entry requirements in general and for individual universities.

Doobydoo Sun 27-Dec-20 13:56:24

I did read re entry etc. Just wondered if points from Diploma and NVQ could be added.

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Doobydoo Sun 27-Dec-20 13:57:19

I will contact my local teacher training place after Christmas.

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LegoPandemic Sun 27-Dec-20 13:58:53

Had you thought about teaching nursing?
I teach Dentistry and love it- much more fun than doing dentistry!

sashh Sun 27-Dec-20 13:59:27

To teach children you need either a teaching degree or a degree then teacher training.

Does it have to be small children? I spent about 5 years doing nothing but supply teaching health and social care. There is a great demand for anyone who can teach anatomy and physiology and you don't need a degree to do the teacher training. You do have to enjoy teaching teenagers though.

Fedup21 Sun 27-Dec-20 14:02:09

You’ll need a degree. Unless you want to be an ‘unqualified’ teacher on the UT scale.

Doobydoo Sun 27-Dec-20 20:22:11

Thanks for replies. I have been thinking for a while re changing jobs. Ideally I would either work for National Trust or with Books but trying to be grownup re options. I shall probably be stuck with Nursing..12.5 hour shifts,no pay if off sick..unless ssp.and beaurocracy ++ ...I know many jobs are like this but I want one where I am not responsible for 40 residents and then the staff and all the pressure......

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LolaSmiles Sun 27-Dec-20 20:25:52

You could gain entry to an undergraduate course if you wanted to do primary education, or one of the limited 3 year with QTS courses. You would need to check the GCSE requirements for the providers.

Others you would need a degree and a postgraduate training course.

It might be worth coming over to the staff room board for advice on career changing and a range of views on teaching.

daisypond Sun 27-Dec-20 20:27:17

You can’t choose to teach age 4-7. I assume you mean you want to teach primary. You have to teach whichever year group you are given.

Littleyell Sun 27-Dec-20 20:29:59

Can you look at NHS for nursing jobs OP? What about research nurse? Outpatients? NHS have a lot better sick pay conditions.

Agency for nurses pays quite well.

TildaTurnip Sun 27-Dec-20 20:31:49

daisypond

You can’t choose to teach age 4-7. I assume you mean you want to teach primary. You have to teach whichever year group you are given.

You can certainly teach 4-7. Pre prep schools are this age range and so are infant schools. You can apply where you like.

clareykb Sun 27-Dec-20 20:32:00

Hi Op I have recently left teaching to retrain in Social Work. I'm pretty sure you would need a degree to do the standard postgrad PGCE or GTP schemes like teach first. You could probably do a Teacher Training Degree which would take at least 3 years and unless you are doing an unpopular subject there isn't much in the way of funding available. My brother is a teacher in FE and I wonder if you could teach Health and Social care at that level without too much further study. Also just to add that some of the reasons that I left teaching was the endless bureaucracy, career progression and pay for being part time and stress, when I was full time I was easily doing 50hrs a week... I am aware I will probably carry some of this over to Social Work with me but the options near me for flexible working seem better in SW and the pay scale is more attractive.

AnneTwackie Sun 27-Dec-20 20:39:05

I taught age 4-7 and reading your previous post: a career with shifts of 12 hours, ++ bureaucracy, high pressure, where taking a sick day is impossible and feeling responsible for up to 40 people at a time... you’ve just described teaching.

LolaSmiles Sun 27-Dec-20 20:39:21

You can’t choose to teach age 4-7. I assume you mean you want to teach primary. You have to teach whichever year group you are given
I have friends who have done 3-7 teacher training courses and have only taught EYFS/KS1. Sure a head could give them year 6, but it would he a waste of their talents and not in a school's interest.

daisypond Sun 27-Dec-20 20:39:38

You can certainly teach 4-7. Pre prep schools are this age range and so are infant schools. You can apply where you like.

Well, yes, you can apply, but you can’t do a teaching qualification in just that age range. And I’m not aware that infant schools are still a thing. There’s none where I live. There’s primary schools only. Pre-preps are a law unto themselves.

TildaTurnip Sun 27-Dec-20 20:41:25

daisypond

*You can certainly teach 4-7. Pre prep schools are this age range and so are infant schools. You can apply where you like.*

Well, yes, you can apply, but you can’t do a teaching qualification in just that age range. And I’m not aware that infant schools are still a thing. There’s none where I live. There’s primary schools only. Pre-preps are a law unto themselves.

There are many infant schools in the county I teach in. When I trained (primary) you could also chose your placements to a certain degree so would end up more experienced in either upper or lower primary.

Fedup21 Sun 27-Dec-20 20:41:41

And I’m not aware that infant schools are still a thing

I’ve taught in three infant schools! I’m teaching in one now.

daisypond Sun 27-Dec-20 20:45:04

Ok, I’m obviously wrong on the infant schools!

Doobydoo Sun 27-Dec-20 20:45:35

Re the 4-7 age range..that is an option at the teacher training institute in my area. Regarding the being in charge of 40 people etc..I do not think that is the same as nursing.I am responsible for 40 vulnerable people..end of life/ unstable diabetics/ dementia etc etc..I doubt that is the same as primary teaching. I was exploring options really

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Doobydoo Sun 27-Dec-20 20:48:39

Plus..I do not receive sick pay..unless off for a number of days where I might receive SSP..which is feck all...so not the same as teaching.

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Harmarsuperstar Sun 27-Dec-20 20:51:45

Doobydoo

Re the 4-7 age range..that is an option at the teacher training institute in my area. Regarding the being in charge of 40 people etc..I do not think that is the same as nursing.I am responsible for 40 vulnerable people..end of life/ unstable diabetics/ dementia etc etc..I doubt that is the same as primary teaching. I was exploring options really

Have you looked at nhs jobs? I had 8 patients today, also get proper sick pay and holidays. Get on the NHS jobs website and see if anything grabs you.

NerrSnerr Sun 27-Dec-20 20:53:39

Have you thought about moving into the NHS? As you have care home experience you could possibly consider being a CHC assessor? They'd probably really want a paed nurse for transitions cases as well as elderly experience as much of the work is care home based too. It's office hours and of course you get the holidays, sickness benefits of the NHS.

lovelemoncurd Sun 27-Dec-20 20:55:34

I moved from nursing to FE teaching to university lecturing. Don't go into teaching for an easier life op. It ain't I can assure you! Go into teaching because you enjoy the stress and the challenge! Otherwise choose a non professional job!

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