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JKR -- sorry for yet another thread about this

(12 Posts)
AskingQuestionsAllTheTime Sat 26-Sep-20 13:33:34

Thing is, I remember that someone here posted what she had actually written in her most recent book about the man in a woman's coat that got a lot of people so riled, but I can't now find that thread (and it was somewhere in the middle of it so even more difficult) and advanced search isn't helping.

Has anyone read it, and could they post the quotes again for me?

Thanks!

OP’s posts: |
Mollyollydolly Sat 26-Sep-20 13:35:50

Don't know where it is on here but it's quoted in this Spectator article by Nick Cohen if you can read it.
www.spectator.co.uk/article/j-k-rowling-s-latest-novel-isn-t-transphobic-

Mollyollydolly Sat 26-Sep-20 13:36:15


He had his failures you know. Penny Hiskett, she got away from him and gave the police a description in ’71, but that didn’t help them much. She said he was dark and stocky, because he was wearing a wig at the time and all padded out in a woman’s coat. They caught him in the end because of Melody Bower. Nightclub singer, looked like Diana Ross. Creed got chatting to her at the bus stop, offered her a lift, then tried to drag her into the van when she said no. She escaped, gave the police a proper description and told them he’d said his house was of Paradise Park.

DancelikeEmmaGoldman Sat 26-Sep-20 13:37:28

Nick Cohen’s review will help you out. A suspect wears a women’s coat.

www.spectator.co.uk/article/j-k-rowling-s-latest-novel-isn-t-transphobic-

littleburn Sat 26-Sep-20 13:39:09

Screen shot from the original post

AskingQuestionsAllTheTime Sat 26-Sep-20 13:43:23

Thanks again! That was the one I was thinking of. It sounds to me like putting on a disguise for committing a crime, plain and simple, and not trans at all.

OP’s posts: |
Siablue Sat 26-Sep-20 13:51:27

It is a disguise for committing a crime. He also does have some fetidhes (collecting items from his victims but then so did Voldemort). It is worth pointing out the the passage is from the point of view of a 1970s detective and he his views are strongly criticised in the book.

AskingQuestionsAllTheTime Sat 26-Sep-20 15:03:27

Yes; that's too complicated for the bandwagon boys, though, isn't it.

I think one thing that's fairly well-attested is that some criminals do seem to collect souvenirs of their crimes: quite often those offer evidence about the crimes after the perpetrator is caught. Chilling stuff: www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/in-excess/201607/sexual-trophies-murder-and-addiction but don't read all of it unless you have a strong stomach: the milder examples are near the beginning. (I'd probably cut off after Hannibal Lecter is mentioned!)

OP’s posts: |
Deliriumoftheendless Sat 26-Sep-20 22:18:16

Shipman kept jewellery of his victims.

Fred West removed body parts.

It’s pretty common for serial killers to take something.

NotBadConsidering Sat 26-Sep-20 22:37:43

I’ve read the whole book. That’s the only bit. It’s an ex cop from the 70s recalling aNother witness’s statement. Madness that it triggered the response it did.

Other bits worth mentioning (no plot spoilers):

Strike mentions the need to get a SHL “shit hot lawyer”.

Strike refuses to get a coffee from Starbucks.

They mention a previous case they had of a man who liked to wear latex under his suit to work.

Waves to JKR 👋😆😆😆

It’s a brilliant book BTW.

ARoombaOfOnesOwn Sat 26-Sep-20 22:59:56

They mention a previous case they had of a man who liked to wear latex under his suit to work.

grin yes this made me wonder if she was a secret MNer!

Goslowlysideways Sun 27-Sep-20 08:10:23

I’ve just finished the book. It’s brilliant I love this series.
What I noticed this time is how well she tackles misogyny in the work place. Men who touch you casually and make you uncomfortable. Thinking about what you wear carefully because a certain type of man will comment. The feeling of a certain type of man who questions your authority and looks for confirmation from a man rather than you.
It’s brilliantly written and the climax of this particular storyline is wonderful.
She writes about the female experience so well.
Also nothing was transphobic but I knew it wouldn’t be before I even started the book.

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