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Remember Merida from Brave, the one who hated tight dresses? She's had a Disney Makeover..

(26 Posts)
kim147 Mon 13-May-13 13:02:39

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

StealthOfficialCrispTester Mon 13-May-13 13:04:28

There was a thread Bout this the other day.
The dcs were watchig brave yesterday and dd was arguing that she wasnt a princess. I dont kniw why but I suspect its because shes not airbrushed.
Why do they give them all those weird cat eyes

Leafmould Tue 14-May-13 00:39:16

Very sad.

SingingSands Tue 14-May-13 00:46:32

I'll bet my boots that it wasn't a female exec who approved that image makeover.

Usually I try not to get het up over princesses, but this has passed me off!

HullMum Tue 14-May-13 02:25:36

who exactly are their target demographic, 8 year old girls or 40 year old men?

endthiscowardice Tue 14-May-13 23:24:20

How depressing. Fuck Disney.

TolliverGroat Wed 15-May-13 07:58:00

Good comparison with Batman

TeiTetua Wed 15-May-13 20:38:53

Apparently Disney has responded to the clamour by removing the new improved Merida:
rebeccahains.wordpress.com/2013/05/13/disney-faces-backlash/

TolliverGroat Wed 15-May-13 20:52:42

But they've not said anything, so it's unclear whether it's a "take it down for now and put it back with a few minor cosmetic tweaks when the scary women have gone away" or an "ah, yes, we see the issue and will have a proper rethink" or something else.

PeggyGuggenheim Wed 15-May-13 21:34:38

Two hundred thousand signatures and a 10-minute segment on Woman's Hour today. But yes -- until Disney say what they intend to do, we shouldn't be complacent. Please sign and share on Facebook if you haven't already (find the petition on Change.org)

PeggyGuggenheim Wed 15-May-13 21:36:54

This is a link to the petition and a round-up of relevant media coverage , which there has been a lot of !!

http://www.amightygirl.com/blog/?p=3305

overdue1 Wed 15-May-13 22:26:14

Message deleted by Mumsnet for breaking our Talk Guidelines. Replies may also be deleted.

TolliverGroat Wed 15-May-13 22:49:42

She looks less like an athletic 16-year-old in the new design, certainly. Do you think that's the same thing as "healthier"?

Here are the Borthwick sisters, for example -- two of Scotland's most promising teenage cyclists. Here is redesigned Merida.

Remember that this is an international petition. I doubt the page 3 petition is attracting much interest outside the UK.

TolliverGroat Wed 15-May-13 22:51:27

(that was a response to the deleted post -- cross-posted with deletion. But in any event, my link shows healthy athletic Scottish teenagers as a point of reference)

MrsPoglesWood Wed 15-May-13 23:05:29

I agree Tolliver she doesn't look 'healthier and slimmer' she looks like Jessica Rabbit. And the makeover goes against everything that her character stands for in the film. Baffling!

gallicgirl Wed 15-May-13 23:09:04

Towardthestars.com have been talking about this for ages.
They posted a pic on Facebook of strong female role models after undergoing the Disney princess treatment to show how foolish it was.
I hate Disney princesses anyway.

TolliverGroat Wed 15-May-13 23:37:21

I'm surprised that "healthier and slimmer" comment got deleted.

I think it's significant, because it illustrates part of why this is important and not just a trivial cartoon. The fact that someone can look at a Disney Princess body type and say "well, it's healthier and slimmer" when it is nothing even remotely like a healthy athletic body type is a reflection on how insidious this kind of message is.

Bah.

MrsPoglesWood Wed 15-May-13 23:51:56

Me too. I thought that it would lead to a healthy or robust debate but I guess it must have been reported.

I just cannot fathom how Disney could promote a film about a young girl being strong, independent, not concerned about her appearance, not liking tight frocks and not wanting to get married and then turn her into an overtly sexual character. What were they thinking?

SacreBlue Wed 15-May-13 23:52:01

http://feministing.com/2012/05/09/what-if-dude-superheroes-posed-like-lady-superheroes/ grin

I am not sure if I would be flamed or not when I say one of my jobs is as a model for animation students?

We have spent months and month drawing the/my human figure as it really is in various poses and latterly, in costume.

In order to be able to draw 'characters' they have lately been practising drawing my 'pose' but the 'figure' of a Disney character.

I was at first a little hmm that they were being given an unrealistic figure to replicate but it is part of their learning process and I am quite smile that I have been also a big part of them honing their observational skills.

In the future they may choose to draw whatever they wish or are paid to (sexy, realistic, stylised, alien) I hope their creativity and skill set will allow them to choose their own path, societal influences will have an impact on the (paid) work available tho.

SacreBlue Wed 15-May-13 23:52:46

feministing.com/2012/05/09/what-if-dude-superheroes-posed-like-lady-superheroes/

TolliverGroat Wed 15-May-13 23:57:27

On similar lines, The Hawkeye Initiative.

MrsPoglesWood Thu 16-May-13 00:04:10

No Sacre I can't see why you would be flamed at all. Lots of female animation characters are realistic and don't buy into the skinny Barbie style proportions that are the stuff of fantasy.

As was Merida in the film. She was portrayed as a normal, brilliant, feisty, tomboy teenager. It's just the re-design of her character for the Disney Princess Hall of Fame thingy where she has suddenly taken on a Barbie tiny waist, tight frock and big bust that she never had before.

I think your job sounds rather cool actually.

SacreBlue Thu 16-May-13 00:48:42

grin best job for me in the world! I suppose I feel a little defensive due to some attitudes re nudity on one hand and animation on the other - combined in my work.

The re design as I understand it is commercialism at it's worst normal self. Those are the images we our children are bombarded with, take on board, and unfortunately, perpetuate by buying into.

I have a DS so far straight and happy with born gender so no worries on mini skirts, boob tubes and associated body dis morphia, but the prevalence of porn, the affected attitudes of his female peers and the peer pressure of his male friends re expectations of women, worries me.

I hope my comfort in my own shape as well as the influence of artists I work with who frankly love the realness of the actual human figure in every shape will counteract the media/porn/other societal influences that he faces, will help him to form attractions to people rather than shapes but I can't be sure currently attracted to online gaming and maths not girls

Spiritedwolf Fri 17-May-13 14:27:19

MrsPogles, I agree with what you said about animation and the original Merida, and I know I'm being a bit nitpicky here, but can we not call her a 'tom boy'? I realise its a way of describing the type of girl she is (and indeed, particially the type of girl I was) but I suspect it comes from suggesting that girls who like that kind of stuff aren't really proper girls. When in fact, there are lots of different ways of being a girl.

I think that some girls don't want to be sporty, outdoorsy, geeky etc because they think its just for boys, calling them 'tom boys' kind of confirms it. I know this is rather subjective, I probably played up to being a bit of a tomboy in some ways as a girl.

I'm a big fan of animation SacreBlue, I think its really cool (I like to draw and wanted to work for disney/pixar when I was young still do ) I think we just need more women in the film industry, whether that's as writers, directors, animators, character designers, concept artists, producers, financial backers, etc. Otherwise people (usually men!) fall back on their image of what a woman/girl/female ought to be which is often about looking pretty, or fulfilling the mum or girlfriend role rather than being a fully rounded character.

TolliverGroat Fri 17-May-13 16:05:58

No, I agree with you. A few people refer to DD1 as a tomboy and it gets right on my wick. It seems like saying "Oh, she doesn't fit into our neat stereotypes of what girls are like? She can't be a proper girl then; let's define her with reference to the masculine."

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