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Help me write a statement for the nursery

(11 Posts)
meowchut Fri 07-Oct-11 21:16:45

i am sorry if this isn't important enough for this area, but it is important to me, and I would appreciate your help.

My dd is almost 3 and has just started nursery. DP and I have to fill out a form to hand back to the nursery, which will in turn be passed to her school. It is an Early Years Foundation Stage Record and it is the final section I would like your help with; the "any other business" section. In this section I would like to write a few paragraphs about how we have tried to bring dd up in a non stereotypical female way, and although I know society isn't non gendered i would like educators to be aware of this. My problem is I am not very articulate so I don't know how to write down what I want, or even if it is appropriate, but I feel if I don't say something at this stage I may never get the chance.

So I sant to say something like: dd is a great child who loves to climb and bounce and get dirty so she tends to wear trousers ad they give her freedom of movement. She likes to dress up and fairy costumes and sparkly shoes are great, but so would be an astronaut or a skeleton, I'd like her to have the choice. She likes cars and dolls. I avoid dressing her in pink, or calling her a princess ( she could only ever be one by mArriage and I don't see marriage as a great career option, sorry Kate ) . She us unique because she is unique , not because she is a girl.

It needs to be short and not to strident as my dp needs a say in this too. He comes from a mining town, but has "broken free" , we share the child c are, household duties and earning responsibility more than any other couple I know. Sometimes though he feels a bit weird about this although he is the least macho mam imaginable. I suppose I am saying it needs to be in parent speak not jargon?

Ps, anyone else in nw London who feels like me? I thought there would be loads of us, but all I see are little boys being laughed St for wearing princess clothes at play drop in, and cute girls dressed in pink skirts who are dragged away from any dirt.

Thanks

OliviaTwist Fri 07-Oct-11 21:41:45

dd is a great child who loves to climb and bounce and get dirty so she tends to wear trousers ad they give her freedom of movement. She likes to dress up and fairy costumes and sparkly shoes are great, but so would be an astronaut or a skeleton, I'd like her to have the choice. She likes cars and dolls. I avoid dressing her in pink, or calling her a princess ( she could only ever be one by mArriage and I don't see marriage as a great career option, sorry Kate ) . She us unique because she is unique , not because she is a girl.

I think that sounds pretty great really. Short and not too 'strident'.

Dozer Fri 07-Oct-11 21:42:51

If you keep it short there's a better chance of them taking note, eg "we wish to avoid gender stereotyping, e.g in play, toys, dressing-up". Athough realistically, the nursery will just do what they normally do!

Dozer Fri 07-Oct-11 21:44:06

Have used 3 nurseries in london, they were all good on this, the problem was other kids saying stuff like "that's for boys / girls".

StewieGriffinsMom Fri 07-Oct-11 21:49:43

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

meowchut Fri 07-Oct-11 23:16:32

Thank you.

I suppose I know that realistically it won't make much of a difference, as anyone caring for or educating her will probably have their own way of doing things. But they did ask, so I am going to tell ! I think I will write something along the lines of what I wrote in my first post, with a few of your additions amendments, actually mentioning the word "gender".

Thanks for responding. I hadn't expected this to be necessary but have been amazed by the gender stereotyping I have seen since having dd.

ecclesvet Sat 08-Oct-11 13:55:18

I think this is a great idea - however, if you're giving her the freedom to choose her play, would you be OK with her choosing to play with other girls who do choose gendered activities?

Stateofplay Sat 08-Oct-11 22:11:53

Great idea, and even if, as one poster said, the nursery pays little regard to your request, it is a small step on the journey to mainstreaming views like ours on not pigeon-holing children according to their gender.

So bravo to you and your DP.

pandorasbox21 Mon 10-Oct-11 17:18:14

In all the years and settings I have worked in I have never met any worker in early years who gender stereotypes children. I really dont think this will be a problem with the settig or staff it is usually a problem with parents tbh as they have set ideas but staff dont.

pandorasbox21 Mon 10-Oct-11 17:22:25

Also your play drop in sounds very very strange every nursery I have worked in boys have dressed up as princesses, had dolls etc. Every girl has also took part in Forest School sessios including using hammers, potato peelers, going in woods or there own nursery which has foresty type of area etc. Most nurseries, breakfast and after school clubs and holiday clubs are like this now. It is pushed a lot by OFSTED

turkeyboots Mon 10-Oct-11 17:23:39

Agree with the other posts, staff should be fine with your statement. But the kids might be a problem. My Dd hasn't worn trousers since she was 3 as a horrid brat on her first day in the pre school room made fun of her trousers. Been pink and skirts and ideally pink skirts since then.

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