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Do you object when you are referred to in the male form of your job title?

(63 Posts)
headfairy Mon 08-Aug-11 14:41:23

I'm not sure I'm phrasing this correctly... are you offended for example if you are referred to as a chairman rather than chairperson? Waiter instead of waitress? Actor instead of Actress?

One of the jobs I do is pretty male dominated and the job description is {jobname}man.... It just sounds odd to refer to it as {jobname}woman or {jobname}person. Should I insist on being referred to as a {jobname}woman/person?

Is any of this making any sense at all <scratches head>

RedBlanket Mon 08-Aug-11 14:45:47

Mine is X Manager

It would seem very odd to be called manageress. If indeed that is the female form. What would be the equivalent taking 'man' out of the description?

Pan Mon 08-Aug-11 14:53:05

Firefighters have fought to be called firefighters - neutral.
Actresses, I am told prefer the generic 'actor' tag.
Chair person really should be "chair".

headfairy Mon 08-Aug-11 14:55:08

maybe it'll be easier if I tell you the job title... I'm a cameraman. I have been for a while now. But I'm a woman. Camerawoman sounds odd. I don't know anyone who's referred to as a camerawoman. There aren't very many of us in my line of work, but we're all cameramen. Referring to myself as a camera would just be odd.

AnyFucker Mon 08-Aug-11 14:57:14

there is no gender-specific title for my job

I think it would irritate me, but not ruin my day, IYSWIM

you see, i don't mind being called "Mrs" because that is what I am

assuming you are man because you are a firefighter, for example, though would certainly grate

AnyFucker Mon 08-Aug-11 14:57:58

could you not just be a "moving photographer" grin

Pan Mon 08-Aug-11 14:58:23

camerafighter...er...

visual imaging device technician. Sorted.

AnyFucker Mon 08-Aug-11 15:01:00

camera operator

msrisotto Mon 08-Aug-11 15:03:00

Camera operator, technician, guru, your choice.

I just don't think gender is important enough to put in the job title, but it's not fair to assume every job is for men so sometimes, a neutral title needs to be found. Someone said on another thread that manageress, was like saying she-manager. It's women as other.

msrisotto Mon 08-Aug-11 15:03:21

Men as default (pressed post message too soon!)

headfairy Mon 08-Aug-11 15:07:39

I see what you mean about the men as default point. Most cameraoperators in news are men, so the job is usually referred to as cameraman. I should hunt out one of the other women here and ask them how they like to be referred to. They're pretty thin on the ground though...

fluffles Mon 08-Aug-11 15:08:14

i'm a "blah blah manager" - i think that the word manageress is a bit odd and unnecessary because i don't think manager is gendered word.

i have been a "waitress" very gendered, and nobody EVERY called me a "waiter" though again, there's no reason why a waiter should be male.

in spoken communication i use 'chair' to refer to a chairperson.. bit odd, calling them a bit of furniture but i'm more happy with 'chair' than 'chairperson' or chairman/chairwoman.

i would expect a cameraman to be a man, and would be very surprised to meet a female cameraman...

LolaRennt Mon 08-Aug-11 15:13:31

Camera tech?

LolaRennt Mon 08-Aug-11 15:14:14

We say server in the US instead of waitress/waiter

FannyPriceless Mon 08-Aug-11 15:17:46

I get more cross if I hear references to the 'female' version of a job title that should be regarded as gender neutral. e.g. manageress, lady doctor.

It is my mission in life to eliminate all gender labelling in job titles!grin Even when I am referring to men in a job I always use a gender neutral term, e.g. sales person, police officer, flight attendant, etc.

Go on - challenge me to find a gender neutral term for any sticky ones you have come across!wink

upahill Mon 08-Aug-11 16:00:26

No I'm just grateful I've got a job after all the redundancies that have hit my place tbh.

headfairy Mon 08-Aug-11 16:02:17

Well Fanny, can you find one for a cameraman? Camera technician sounds ... a bit technical. I'm an artist don'tcha know? grin

Seriously though, work have come up with a ridiculously poncey name which offends me more than cameraman.

msrisotto Mon 08-Aug-11 16:05:16

Visual imaging director I reckons. grin

TanteAC Mon 08-Aug-11 16:07:52

Surely 'Camera Lady ' would be much, much nicer?
wink

I once heard a woman in her 30s reference the 'Lady Busdriver'. Had an odd visual image of some Little Britain-style minor royal driving around. Ridiculous

headfairy Mon 08-Aug-11 16:12:15

tante But I'm not a laaaaayyyyyydy. I'm a woman <beats bare breasts> grin

Can't stand being referred to as a lady.

aliceliddell Mon 08-Aug-11 16:16:27

Bare breasts, headfairy? It's not even half past four! <Shakes head in despair at falling standards>

TeamDamon Mon 08-Aug-11 16:17:08

I love being a teacher grin

Although in certain types of schools (in one of which I may or may not teach wink), which have ye olde poncey sexist titles, it sounds much less strange to be Master i/c Debating or whatever than it does to be Mistress i/c Debating. The word 'mistress' has all sorts of unfortunate connotations...

headfairy Mon 08-Aug-11 16:38:07

grin Aliceliddell

Damon, you're just injecting those connotations in to the word Mistress (you filthy sod) grin

FannyPriceless Mon 08-Aug-11 17:47:17

headfairy Doesn't anyone say camera person? That's what I would say.

What dreadful thing have they suggested?

PrettyCandles Mon 08-Aug-11 18:13:54

I visited a school where they didn't have a Deputy Headwhatever, or an Assistant Headwhatever, but a Vice Master. Reader, I snurked.

IMO with job titles that do not have 'man' in the name, but are modified to create a female form, eg waiter/waitress, the generic form should cover all genders, ie waiter.

Titles that do have 'man' in the name should be replaced by a different form entirely, eg chairperson, firefighter.

With some titles that would be tricky - camera artist?

And perhapd there should be allowance for people who wish to retain a gender-specific form for their own job, particularly when they are not one of many in that place, eg headmaster, headmistress.

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